I made an ABS triggering/flushing device - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 12:47 PM Thread Starter
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I made an ABS triggering/flushing device

To make sure your ABS stays healthy, it is a good idea to activate your ABS system from time to time. It prevents the valves in the ABS to become sticky. Some people do this by regularly slamming the brakes on gravel, but I'm way too chicken for that. So I made a device that allows me to activate the ABS whilst the bike is stationary.


Another reason to have make this device is that I want to flush the brake fluid inside the ABS system. Internally in the system, there is fluid that never gets refreshed (behind the valves in the chamber that is pressurised by the ABS motor). After many years, this fluid will contain moisture, which can corrode the valves in the ABS, leading to a total ABS failure.

What does it do?
The device fools the motorcycle into thinking that it is moving at 30km/h. There are 2 buttons on the device: front and rear. When you push the button 'front', the device simulates a front wheel skid by stopping the signal to the motorcycle 5 times/second for 1/10th of a second.

How does it work?
When you push the button, the motorcycle will think that the front wheel is skidding, engage the ABS motor and close and open up the valves 10 times/second. If you push the button whilst the brake is applied, you will feel the pulsing of the ABS. If you push the button whilst the caliper bleeder is open, fluid will be pumped from the master cylinder reservoir through the ABS towards the caliper. This effectively flushes the entire brake system, including the ABS.

Now for the technical bits and pieces:
The V-Strom (DL650A K8 in my case) uses a 2 wire Bosch ABS sensor. The ECU provides the sensor with 12V, which goes to ground over a 80 Ohm resistor inside the ECU. The sensor has an internal magnetic field generator and logic to do auto-zero, so it only outputs a binary signal: high for no metal in front of the sensor, low for metal in front of the sensor (this is the metal from the sensor ring on the wheel). The result is a square wave of 50 HZ / wheel revolution with a high of 1,1V and a low of 0,56V.
Now there is two things that we can do if we want to simulate the signal of the sensor:
- either use a logic gate and 2 resistors to make a voltage divider, which we then hook up to the internal wiring on the motorcycle
- either simulate the sensor ring by providing an external magnetic field to the sensor.
I choose the second way, since it's much easier to just unscrew both wheel sensors than to dig into the bike to disconnect the sensors.
The magnetic field is generated by using a coil from an old relais. The coil is energised push/pull, which means that both wires are connected to a logical totem-pole output. In the "on" position output 1 is high and output 2 is low. In the "off" position this is reversed. This effectively creates a magnetic field that changes polarity, even though we only use a single 5V source as power supply. To couple the magnetic field to the sensor I had to experiment a bit. If you put the center of the coil up against the center of the sensor, it will not work. This saturates the sensor and it doesn't give any output. Increasing the distance a bit works, but this is a sensitive setup. What worked much better was to position the coil at 90 degrees to the sensor, with the coil just in front of the tip of the sensor. This solution works, but only in the plane perpendicular to the white extrusion on the sensor. In this orientation, the coil is probably aligned with the internal magnetic field of the sensor. In any case, in this orientation the coil can reliably excite the sensor.
To trigger the coils, I use an arduino with a simple timing based on the micros() function. The coils only pull 8mA, so there is no danger in overloading the ports.

If anyone is interested in replicating this device, I will make a video to explain how you can do this and I will post the code.
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Last edited by kodel; 09-22-2019 at 09:07 AM. Reason: added video
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post #2 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 12:54 PM
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I don't have enough time left for you to explain it to me so that I would understand it. much thanks anyhow.
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post #3 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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Here are some pictures of the setup.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Screenshot 2019-09-20 at 17.45.06.jpg (230.4 KB, 23 views)
File Type: jpg Screenshot 2019-09-20 at 17.45.20.jpg (345.1 KB, 21 views)
File Type: jpg Screenshot 2019-09-20 at 17.46.10.jpg (239.5 KB, 21 views)
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post #4 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 12:56 PM
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Clever!

It's a good idea to make sure you know how how your ABS is going to react and how it feels. Last thing you want to do is be in an emergency situation and not know how the bike will react. Getting the rear to activate is easy, just step hard on the pedal. For the front try a quick grab/release of the brake lever on gravel or a bumpy piece of road. Even it it didn't work the bike won't fall over and if you do it enough you will grow confident in it's working.

..Tom

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2012 DL650 139,500+ km, 86,700+ miles. Sold
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This can help preventing from cars pulling out in front of you (SMIDSY)
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post #5 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 01:01 PM
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Patent that thing and start marketing it! Very cool!
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post #6 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 01:03 PM
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Wow. Serious brain cycles to read the above lol

Very clever as Tom said.

I have read too many threads on abs failure. I need to remember to play in gravel more often.

Great job and why this forum is so excellent!!
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post #7 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 01:29 PM
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This is a very timely thread. I recently flushed my hydraulics again and hoping to clear old juice out of the ABS unit I turned to my HealTech... Turns out that although the Suzuki tool will force run the ABS unit, the HealTech will not. Bummer. I asked HealTech support if I was simply missing something, but they confirmed that it is not a feature of their existing unit. They also mentioned that they are in the middle of refreshing their product line. I asked if the refresh would be a software / firmware update or if it will require new hardware, they answered new hardware. Another bummer... I made a few more suggestions for improvements and they said they will pass them along to the design team. It would be awesome if they also publish a software update for their existing hardware to include the ABS active test. If Suzuki's OBD system is anything like other car systems, forcing the ABS to run should be little more than figuring out the correct commands and then injecting them, so I would hope their current interface hardware is capable. Finger's crossed...

In the meantime, I'm stuck without a way to force the ABS to run. I thought about putting voltage to the pump motor and solenoids, but that is just too risky for me with so many unknowns and such a high replacement cost.

I had to do it the old school way of stabbing the brakes while riding across the circle several times. But there are several weaknesses to this approach... I don't know what the dead volume of the ABS pump is, nor do I know how big each nibble (pulse) is. So there is no way to know how much I need to lock up and activate the ABS unit to cycle out the fluid within it. Additionally, if I do it too much, wouldn't the ABS pump just ingest the majority of the same crappy fluid it just pushed out? I suppose that rotating it and diluting it a bit with the fresh is better than nothing.

I would much rather be able to force run the ABS while in the shop, if for no other reason than being able to purge by running the ABS with the bleed valve open (which can't be done by riding and stabbing the brakes).

You sir, are a genius! It is completely non-invasive to remove the wheel sensors and attach them to some, let's say, 3D printed gizmos that falsify input signals to get the ABS to trigger on its own... A couple of 555 timer chips and some coils, and ShaZam! Or an even lower tech approach of fastening a piece of metal to a small motor that spins it in front of the sensor. Getting the latter to work would depend on how tolerant the system is for confusing / bogus input signals. Although a sophisticated enough disc with some holes missing would fix any sloppy timing. Although getting the two discs to spin at close enough to the same speed (if that is even necessary) could be challenging. I suppose one could use the same disc with the sensors mounted on opposite ends, but that would required getting both sensors to meet in the middle of the bike, and the easy / non-invasive nature would be out the window...
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post #8 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 05:37 PM
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimmer View Post
In the meantime, I'm stuck without a way to force the ABS to run. I thought about putting voltage to the pump motor and solenoids, but that is just too risky for me with so many unknowns and such a high replacement cost.
.
This is a question. Not a suggestion.
When you turn the key on, doesn't the system pump come up to pressure and then shut off when it checks okay?

If true and you had the bleeder hose open when the key is turned on _ would the pump not continue to pump?

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post #9 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 07:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVDucati View Post
This is a question. Not a suggestion.
When you turn the key on, doesn't the system pump come up to pressure and then shut off when it checks okay?

If true and you had the bleeder hose open when the key is turned on _ would the pump not continue to pump?
To my knowledge, only the fuel pump comes on with the key (and the exhaust flap moves through a self test and back to home).

I have never felt any change in the brake handle when turning on the key.

I'm pretty sure the ABS system as a whole is disabled until you move forward at a few miles per hour (then the ABS light goes out).
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post #10 of 56 Old 09-20-2019, 07:20 PM
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I would like to see the video and arduino code. (I ike to play with electronics!)

I'm getting ready to add braided stainless brake lines and this would help me know I have a complete fluid flush and bleed afterward. Plus I feel I may be able to use it on other bikes.
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