Time to electrify - Stromtrooper Forum : Suzuki V-Strom Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 22 Old 03-28-2014, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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Time to electrify

Edit- gonna read (re-read) a good bit more threads to learn what others have done first. No need to respond unless you wish. Thanks.



Wondering if you folks would help me understand the electrical mods needed to operate certain devices. Ive never worked on dc anything btw.

I would like to power a gps;
bluetooth device for music and phone;
maybe electric vest;
maybe extra lighting up front;
gopro;

I dunno what else yet.

And I'll bet there's a thread that will help immensely.
My assumption is that I would learn best in my own thread; ask the questions as they come to my head.

So Im ready to order parts and start. I have my own service manual for the '12 adv model.

Thank you,
John

Last edited by Jproaster; 03-30-2014 at 07:27 PM.
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post #2 of 22 Old 03-28-2014, 07:20 PM
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I installed an auxiliary fuse block that hooks to the battery through two large gauge cables. It allowed me to put each gizmo on its own circuit and fuse. I forgot where I bought it but I believe "Eastern Beaver" has them. I mounted it under the seat and behind the battery just behind the plastic divider.

The strom does not have an over abundance of electrical power. The heated clothes pull some amps as well as extra lights (depending on type).

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post #3 of 22 Old 03-28-2014, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Scott E. Bonds View Post
I installed an auxiliary fuse block that hooks to the battery through two large gauge cables. It allowed me to put each gizmo on its own circuit and fuse. I forgot where I bought it but I believe "Eastern Beaver" has them. I mounted it under the seat and behind the battery just behind the plastic divider.

The strom does not have an over abundance of electrical power. The heated clothes pull some amps as well as extra lights (depending on type).
good advice- auxiliary switched fuse block is the way to go.

Easiest to buy a kit, but you can easily make your own from the components (mine cost $15 in parts).

I'd also recommend adding a voltmeter at the same time so you can watch your power consumption.
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post #4 of 22 Old 03-28-2014, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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Id actually like to make my own- good learning.
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post #5 of 22 Old 03-29-2014, 12:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jproaster View Post
Wondering if you folks would help me understand the electrical mods needed to operate certain devices. Ive never worked on dc anything btw.
Start with this: On most vehicles the whole chassis is connected to the negative terminal of the battery, and the positive side supplies the juice to the item, via switches or whatever. The metallic parts of the structure are used as part of the electric circuit. That has been the case for ages. This is called negative ground, or negative earth in parts of the British Commonwealth. Some British cars, back when, ran a positive ground system (My 1961 Austin Mini 850 and my equally old Sunbeam Rapier were both positive ground I think, but I could be wrong on one of them - it was a while ago.) A few large North American trucks did the same for some unknown (to me) reason.

So, what relevance has this to you and your VStrom. This sophisticated modern conveyance has an aluminum alloy frame, and components of various metallic alloys. Well, not titanium and expensive stuff like that, but you still need to know that it's not all steel.

The negative part of the circuitry in our beloved wees, vees, glees and whatever the new 1000 is called is done through wires, not the chassis or other components. These are not the good old days. You pass a current through zinc and steel, or aluminum and steel, or magnesium and anything else, or any two dissimilar metals, add moisture, some dirt and maybe some road salt, and one of the metals preferentially corrodes. There are rules and tables as to which one rots first. Neat stuff, actually. (I've seen bumpers on late '70s Oldsmobiles fall off due to this galvanic action. You don't even have to pass a current through some such set-ups - they create their own current. Hey, this is how batteries work.)

Our wonderful modern machines avoid, to a great extent, such problems by using specific ground wires for everything electrical. (Well, except for spark plugs and maybe a few other things).

The gist of this: Don't use the frame, engine or anything else as part of the circuit, even if your grandpa did so on his Desoto. You will probably run everything positive from a fuse block that you install, which in turn is connected to the battery positive post. You need to run all the negative wires back, ultimately, to the battery negative post to complete the circuit.

I'm not sure how others have done this (if they've done this at all). I will tell you later how I have done it (gotta go bed right now). You could run the whole mass of negative cables back to the battery post (a real mess), or to some negative terminal already in place, or to one you install somewhere. I'm interested in seeing what others have done. Let's see!

Marc, rider of a black 2009 V-Strom 650A ABS

"To the Companion who knows how to go light and fare hard, who is friendly with the rain, and finds no road too long." William Blake in "Brown Waters and other Sketches", Malbaie, May, 1915.
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post #6 of 22 Old 03-29-2014, 12:50 AM
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I think Greywolf and some others mounted an auxiliary fuse block in the front faring then ran their circuits from there.

I have an Adventure Tech auxliary dash (fits around the key) which powers a Powerlet outlet and a Cigarette Lighter outlet (these were on the bike from the PO).

I have an adapter from the Powerlet to a SAE type plug which runs to my tank bag.

I just wired my tank bag using one of these "RV Roof Connector" SAE outlets"
73 SAE Connectors, Plugs, Sockets & Cords

You can purchase them for a lot more money on motorcycle specific sites and they will come with a backing plate and nuts and bolts. I used a large washer, (drilled the 4 mounting holes) for a backing plate and purchased stainless screws and nyloc nuts, for a lot less.

I like SAE because the connections don't jiggle apart like common cigarette lighter type connections. They are worthless if you ride off road at all.

Inside my tank bag split the wiring into two SAE plugs, one will go to a double USB adapter to power the cell phone and charge the Go Pro or Scala batteries. The other is extra for now, but will also probably power USB plugs since that is the standard right now.

I'm cheap so I took a cheap walmart cigarette light to double USB adapter, opened it up and simply clipped the wires that normally would have received power from the cigarette lighter outlet and soldered in a SAE plug. The pig tails simply come out of the adapter where the + button was. If that doesn't make sense I can post some pics.

I also ran new power up to the handle bars from the battery for my Warm & Safe Heatroller.

If you're handy with a soldering iron and have some heat shrink these are easy projects. If it's all new to you.....do some more reading.

Tim

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post #7 of 22 Old 03-29-2014, 01:29 AM
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Here's the schematic:




and here's the instructions:
Motorcycle Power Relay and Distribution Block | Canyon Chasers Motorcycle Sport Touring


I used the rear tail-light as my switched source. I bought the relay from radio shack, and the fuse block from NAPA.

Last edited by Rashnak; 03-29-2014 at 01:38 AM.
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post #8 of 22 Old 03-29-2014, 01:42 AM
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It's better if a fuse block is used instead of a distribution block. You can fuse each device that way.

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Nicknames I use to lessen typing, Vee = 2002-2012 DL1000s. Vee2=2014-2016 DL1000s. Wee = 2004-2011 DL650s. Glee = 2012-2016 DL650s
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post #9 of 22 Old 03-29-2014, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for info guys- theory to save a buck to parts wisdom.

Lets say Id like to electrify my tank bag (not even mounted yet WM Rainier) and have a fusible block as a starting point.

Lets also consider the ease of removing the bag- especially as I consider the Fall trip to Mex and Guatemala.

Thanks.
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post #10 of 22 Old 03-29-2014, 07:56 AM
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If you know what you want and where you want to mount it I'd power everything other than the heated gear through the EB PC8.

However if you don't yet know what you may want for devices an electrified tankbag can make it much easier to try out various devices without having to install dedicated power leads.

For heated gear I use a fused SAE connection straight to the battery that doubles as a battery tender lead.


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