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Has anyone used this method, guys on YouTube make it looks super easy, spoon free easy. I have a 14 1000. But I think wheels aside from adventure are all similar.
 

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I tried it, you have to get the zip ties super tight. Still wasn’t as easy as the video. The ties break pretty easily too. Give it a shot.


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I've used it twice now and it's my "go to" method using a Harbor Freight manual tire changer. I used the large, again Harbor Freight, 24" zip-ties. Basically squeeze the beads as together as you can depending on the tire selected. Use plenty of RuGlyde (Napa) lube to mount. Yes, you can use soap and water I splurged. Worked fine as long as you keep the bead already mounted deep in the wheel so the other side slips over.
 

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Has anyone used this method, guys on YouTube make it looks super easy, spoon free easy. I have a 14 1000. But I think wheels aside from adventure are all similar.
I've used it. You need thick, strong ties. I have used a ratchet-strap to squeeze the beads together toward the end of the tying process. This approach beats spending tens of minutes (and making blue air) wrangling tire irons. On trips, I carry wire ties (and tire irons, some lube and a patch kit) so that I have some recourse in case of a severe puncture for which a plug is not enough to get home.
 

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I'm willing to bet the first time this is tried the air does turn blue talking to God. Once learned it sounds like it may be a situation saver.
i usually carry some clothes detergent, that may act as a lube if used liberally.
I imagine that carrying a compressor is a necessity too!

At a BMW rally, there was an exercise it tire mounting and we used a nylon strap around the circumference of the tire and a stick or tire iron to twist the strap and force the tire against the rim. You can get oversized CO2 canisters at the bicycle shops that can provide the initial big burst of inflation to seat the bead.
 

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I've tried it and, for me, it's not worth the extra effort. The whole point of the ties is to compress the sidewalls together so they drop down into the channel of the rim; that gives you enough slack to get the opposite side of the tire over the rim. I've found that just kneeling on the tire while you work the opposite side over the rim works just fine, with no big struggle and casting curses on the CEO of the tire maker. It even works with the thick sidewalls of bias ply tires like the E07's.

I tried, and gave up, several times with trying to change my own tires. Then I watched this video, and the whole process clicked for me. Since then, I've changed 19 tires of different types (yep, I keep track) with just four spoons. For me, the zip ties just made the process more complicated.

 

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... For me, the zip ties just made the process more complicated.
Agreed. Develop the correct skill, and you'll be done a lot quicker and easier using three tire irons than by farting around with zip-ties, expensive machines, and other gimmicks. Plus, you'll be able to handle tire changes and repairs "in the field" if and when it's necessary.

I really don't understand where all these overcomplicated shortcuts come from.

There's also a whole subgenre of absolutely moronic overcomplicated and incredibly dangerous bead breaking "tricks", too, not to mention dozens of idiotic corrosive or dangerous hillbilly substitutes for tire mounting lube.
 

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I can usually slam the tire on at an angle to get the first bead on. The 2nd bead is fairly quick and easy. I always found removing the old tire to be worse than installing the new one. Now, I just lever up each bead, and cut it with a cutoff wheel.
 

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LOL, I've seen some of those bead breaker ones, like putting a 2x6 on the tire and driving your car up on it. I have a plastic wedge that I hid with a dead blow hammer to break the bead, though in a pinch you could whack the wedge with a rock. The wedge is from Motion Pro, but I think one of those ABS plastic logging wedges would work too.

I do understand the desire for shortcuts and alternative methods, though....first time I tried changing a tire on a Harley, I gave up...I was convinced that there was some special magic that could only be worked by a tire changing machine. I tried (and failed) a couple times trying to do it myself, along with lots of choruses of "this is bullshit, this can't be done by hand!". The first time I actually got one dismounted, I tried the zip tie thing to try and mount a new tire, but the zip ties broke before I could get the tire compressed. That one ended up going to a dealership to be mounted. Same another time that I couldn't get the bead to seat; that was off to a tire shop I frequent, and they were good enough to seat it for me.

If you don't use the right technique, changing a tire seems like pushing a boulder uphill with a drinking straw. Once I got it down pat, the other methods like the zip tie thing weren't necessary for me. I do use four spoons though; three shorts to work one side of the bead off the rim, and a long one to get the opposite side off. That involves sitting the tire upright, sticking the spoon in from the opposite side and levering the tire off the rim just a little bit. Then i just kneel on the tire and it pops right off.

Tire lube is the key. I use a lot, and once I started doing that, this process became way easier.
 

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I've long wondered if the following is practical. Someday, (with some bad luck to get started), I will find out.


If a tire is simply to have a hole patched, and you can discover where the hole is without taking the wheel off the bike, maybe the patch can be applied with just one bead slipped over its rim with the wheel still on the bike. It seems like getting the wheel back on could be tricky under field conditions.


Has anybody tried this? With what result?
 

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I used packing tape instead of zip ties. Duct tape works too.
The key was lots of soap with a little water.
Oh and my fat arse to force the tire over the lip.
 

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no need for this, waste of zip ties. Ride the bead out if't it's hard to break then good tyre spoon and that's it.
 

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Agreed. Develop the correct skill, and you'll be done a lot quicker and easier using three tire irons than by farting around with zip-ties, expensive machines, and other gimmicks. Plus, you'll be able to handle tire changes and repairs "in the field" if and when it's necessary.

I really don't understand where all these overcomplicated shortcuts come from.

There's also a whole subgenre of absolutely moronic overcomplicated and incredibly dangerous bead breaking "tricks", too, not to mention dozens of idiotic corrosive or dangerous hillbilly substitutes for tire mounting lube.
My favorite of the Youtube tire change videos are the "seat the bead by explosion". I've never once had that become necessary, but I'm forever glad for shirtless Cletus and his backyard mechanic antics, because seeing someone set their hair on fire after filling a tire full of starter fluid and lighting it is always worth a giggle.
 

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...If a tire is simply to have a hole patched, and you can discover where the hole is without taking the wheel off the bike, maybe the patch can be applied with just one bead slipped over its rim with the wheel still on the bike. It seems like getting the wheel back on could be tricky under field conditions.
Just plug the tire, why would you do an internal patch especially on the road?

You can patch a tube with just one side of the tire off the rim. Some can do it with the wheel on the bike.

I always thought it was easier just to take the wheel off and pull the tube out.
 
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I think you'd be making it a lot harder to do with the wheel on. You'e have a lot less leverage when you were trying to get one side of the bead off the rim, not to mention a lot less room to work, since the bike itself would get in the way. Getting the bead back on after you were done would be even more difficult, since you can't kneel on the tire to force it down into the channel. Seating the bead would be the worst; I've always been able to seat mine with a small 12 volt compressor because I can bounce them on the ground while the compressor is running. That would be tough to do with the tire and wheel still on the bike.
 

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I've used starting fluid to set the bead on a skidloader tire...no worries :devil_27::devil_27::devil_27:
 

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I've used starting fluid to set the bead on a skidloader tire...no worries :devil_27::devil_27::devil_27:
LOL, I've seen it done successfully many times...but come on, tell me you don't laugh when you see some guy in shower flip flops and meth teeth unsuccessfully try it with an ATV tire? Now that is some Must See TV.
 

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ALL depends on the tire...........and some are a real bear even with an expensive tire changer system.
 

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The E07 was definitely the stiffest tire I've changed, as far as sidewalls go, and even that one surrendered to my mighty bulk kneeling on it to squeeze it. I'm tempted to buy a Dakar or even a Heidenau just to see how tough it is to put one on.
 

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" Ride the bead out "

The 705 Shinko rolls off the rim pretty easily when the air gets out of the tire. Mine just about rolled off pushing the bike on a trailer recently.
 
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