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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody here tried using wire ties to help them get both tires beads on or off the rim at the same time? Yesterday I tried to use 24" long wire ties to get a Battlewing 502G off my Wee's rear rim. After 20-25 minutes I gave up, cut the zip ties off and used my tires irons. Another 2-3 minutes the tire was off the rim.

There are many videos on YouTube showing how to get a tire off the rim and also a new tire back on the rim. After my failure to get the tire off the rim using zip ties, I just used my tire irons to spoon a new tire on the rim. Maybe I did not use enough zip ties?

 

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Me and a buddy tried it "did not work", we will not be wasting our time like that ever again. That is my 2 cents.........
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your feedback. The videos that I had seen on Youtube involved lower profile tires which almost feel off the rim when zip tied. Perhaps our size tires are too "deep". They are not even close to falling off the rim. The inner diameter of the zip tied tires are way smaller than the rim diameter.
 

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The best friend I have for a tire change is hot pavement and the Sun. I hate trying to change a cold tire. Maybe the zip tie method would work better that way?

I'm off to Youtube to look at it

Ok I looked at it. I was using straps to help collapse mine. While I don't think I can get a wheel off this way I will be using this on my tire changer to force the sidewalls to the inside from now on. I believe it will make my tire changer much more effecient.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The best friend I have for a tire change is hot pavement and the Sun. I hate trying to change a cold tire. Maybe the zip tie method would work better that way?

I'm off to Youtube to look at it
I wish you luck with zip ties. I had no luck with them at all.

I agree with you, it is much more difficult to change a tire on a cold day. I had keep my tire indoors overnight, then put it in my car with the windows rolled up until mid-afternoon. It felt a bit warm when I went to install it yesterday, but it still was stiff on a day that where the temperature reached the mid-fifties.
 

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I wish you luck with zip ties. I had no luck with them at all.

I agree with you, it is much more difficult to change a tire on a cold day. I had keep my tire indoors overnight, then put it in my car with the windows rolled up until mid-afternoon. It felt a bit warm when I went to install it yesterday, but it still was stiff on a day that where the temperature reached the mid-fifties.
Yeah but it was a cold 50. I know I'm right next door
 

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FWIW, the accounts I've seen of the zip tie method usually use at least twice that many zip ties.

I can't imagine how it would save any time or effort. If you have any idea at all what you're doing with tire irons, you can have the whole job done long before someone futzing with zip ties will have the tire off.

Same with a No Mar or similar tire changers -- they're very fast once you finally get the wheel clamped into place, but it usually takes 20 minutes of farting around with the clamps (and the wheel popping out over and over and over and over) before you can commence.

This goes a little faster if you only work on bikes where the wheel diameter is the same. On bikes with different front and rear diameters, there's a good chance someone with a little tire iron experience will be done while the No-Mar team is still cursing at the rim clamps.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
FWIW, the accounts I've seen of the zip tie method usually use at least twice that many zip ties.

I can't imagine how it would save any time or effort. If you have any idea at all what you're doing with tire irons, you can have the whole job done long before someone futzing with zip ties will have the tire off.

Same with a No Mar or similar tire changers -- they're very fast once you finally get the wheel clamped into place, but it usually takes 20 minutes of farting around with the clamps (and the wheel popping out over and over and over and over) before you can commence.

This goes a little faster if you only work on bikes where the wheel diameter is the same. On bikes with different front and rear diameters, there's a good chance someone with a little tire iron experience will be done while the No-Mar team is still cursing at the rim clamps.
I agree with everything you said. Many years ago I bought a Harbor Freight motorcycle tire changer. The only thing I use that for now is for breaking the bead. Other than that I can change a tire faster with just tire irons. I do find that No Mar's Yellow Thing helps hold the bead in place and makes the job of installing the new tire faster and easier. YellowThing Tire Tool
 

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I've used the "zip tie" method twice now for installation only. Both times I used irons to remove the old tire and also both times were summer time changes and left new tire in the sun to warm up. Basically I used large ties to bring the beads of the tire together, used plenty of lube on the wheel and after a couple attempts the tire did pop on the wheel pretty easy. Since then I picked up a harbor freight changer and MC attachment. Now it seems both tires are lasting much longer and I've not used the changer yet.

Rick
 

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What helps in MAJOR WAY to install tires, is spray the tire beads and rim edges with silicone. It will also help to break the bead when you are next time removing the old tires.
 

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...

Same with a No Mar or similar tire changers -- they're very fast once you finally get the wheel clamped into place, but it usually takes 20 minutes of farting around with the clamps (and the wheel popping out over and over and over and over) before you can commence.

This goes a little faster if you only work on bikes where the wheel diameter is the same. On bikes with different front and rear diameters, there's a good chance someone with a little tire iron experience will be done while the No-Mar team is still cursing at the rim clamps.

I've got a Harbor Freight changer with Mojo blocks and a Mojo lever. Set-up takes a couple of minutes.

I've used tire irons for decades. The HF changer is much easier, piece o' cake compared to irons.

Here's how easy it is.

 

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What helps in MAJOR WAY to install tires, is spray the tire beads and rim edges with silicone. It will also help to break the bead when you are next time removing the old tires.

I don't think that silicone is a good idea, remains slippery right?

Windex works, it will dry out and not let the tire slip on the rim. There are tire specific lubes also. I use stuff that Napa Auto sells.
 

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We use a no mar. I don't know if it is the stiff side walls of the dual sport tires or what but I will most likely pay someone next time. Took forever and was way too much work. And is about impossible to lock the wheels completely in at least on ours.
 

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We use a no mar. I don't know if it is the stiff side walls of the dual sport tires or what but I will most likely pay someone next time. Took forever and was way too much work. And is about impossible to lock the wheels completely in at least on ours.

Try using a strap around a wheel spoke wrapped around one of the arms of the changer. That will stop the wheel from spinning.

I just installed a rear Shinko 705. Easy with my HF changer. Got to keep the opposite bead down in the rim though. To me it didn't have a stiff side wall compared to some dirt bike tires I've changed.
 

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Stiff sidewalls are a mixed blessing, to be sure. Hard to spoon on or off a rim, but I once had to ride a few miles on a rear with 0 pressure. It stayed on and the bike was (barely) rideable.
 

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Try using a strap around a wheel spoke wrapped around one of the arms of the changer. That will stop the wheel from spinning.

I just installed a rear Shinko 705. Easy with my HF changer. Got to keep the opposite bead down in the rim though. To me it didn't have a stiff side wall compared to some dirt bike tires I've changed.
Thanks for the advise. That would have helped immensely. I might try it again next time now.
 

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Most of the times I have seen anyone successfully demonstrate the zip tie method I have noticed that it usually happens to be on sportbike tires and usually the rear. My take away is that the wider tire (and wheel), plus softer sidewall probably allows for a lot more flexing and deflection than a typical DS style tire that has a narrow mounting width and stiffer sidewall.
 
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