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So I went to the suzuki dealership in Boulder today after a nice mountain ride to see about getting my FI system remapped with the yosh box. I figured it would take about 5mins because that's what I have read on here. I figure, give them the bike, empty my bladder and get out. The guy at the maintenance counter tells me it takes a couple of days because they have to hook it up to some dyno jet thing-a-ma-jig and I'm like "I thought you just hook it up, re-map the system and I'm out." He's like "oh no, I'm going to need your bike for at least three days." So I got the hell on outta there. So is this guy full of *&#[email protected] and wants to empty my pockets (or maybe he just doensn't know ^&%$) or am I wrong?? From what I have read it is a simple enough procedure. Thanks for any insight (and if anyone knows a place in the denver area to get it done that would be helpful too!)
 

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So I went to the suzuki dealership in Boulder today after a nice mountain ride to see about getting my FI system remapped with the yosh box. I figured it would take about 5mins because that's what I have read on here. I figure, give them the bike, empty my bladder and get out. The guy at the maintenance counter tells me it takes a couple of days because they have to hook it up to some dyno jet thing-a-ma-jig and I'm like "I thought you just hook it up, re-map the system and I'm out." He's like "oh no, I'm going to need your bike for at least three days." So I got the hell on outta there. So is this guy full of *&#[email protected] and wants to empty my pockets (or maybe he just doensn't know ^&%$) or am I wrong?? From what I have read it is a simple enough procedure. Thanks for any insight (and if anyone knows a place in the denver area to get it done that would be helpful too!)
Yep...he is full of crap.:rolleyes: The only thing that would maybe make sense, would be to check the fuel/air ratio with a sniffer. If he is going to do a dyno tune while using a Yosh adjuster, than that is plain hilarious. Otherwise it is about a 10 to 15 min job "at best". Tell ya what...just get yourself a PCIII and be done with it. Your Strom will run perfect, and you can adjust the fuel output anytime you want.
 

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Quote from the Yoshimura Advanced Fuel Management System Adjuster Box instructions:

"Yoshimura recommends that all tuning/testing be done on a load-step dynamometer with an exhaust gas analyzer. Please keep a logbook of adjustments made to the motorcycle(s) fuel injection so changes can be monitored and the bike can be tuned in the most efficient manner."

They also recommend when adjusting the idle map that you keep the CO% in the 2-3% range for "optimum mixture". They liken it to adjusting the pilot mixture screw on a carbed bike and that every bike will respond differently.

This is the reason I will be dyno tuning mine with the Yosh box this week (based on when the box gets delivered).

You can tweek your bike without the dyno (mine was as well as B's) but if you have access to the dyno and exaust gas analyzer ( which sounds like you do ) I would consider going that route. I do believe that the 3 days is a bit excessive, however. You should be able to fully dial in the ECM with a half dozen pulls at the most. I'll know for sure later.

Ride safe.
 

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Quote from the Yoshimura Advanced Fuel Management System Adjuster Box instructions:

"Yoshimura recommends that all tuning/testing be done on a load-step dynamometer with an exhaust gas analyzer. Please keep a logbook of adjustments made to the motorcycle(s) fuel injection so changes can be monitored and the bike can be tuned in the most efficient manner."

They also recommend when adjusting the idle map that you keep the CO% in the 2-3% range for "optimum mixture". They liken it to adjusting the pilot mixture screw on a carbed bike and that every bike will respond differently.

This is the reason I will be dyno tuning mine with the Yosh box this week (based on when the box gets delivered).

You can tweek your bike without the dyno (mine was as well as B's) but if you have access to the dyno and exaust gas analyzer ( which sounds like you do ) I would consider going that route. I do believe that the 3 days is a bit excessive, however. You should be able to fully dial in the ECM with a half dozen pulls at the most. I'll know for sure later.

Ride safe.
Yup......I know that is what Yoshimura recommends, but by the time most people spend the money on a dyno tune and other labor, you could've pretty much bought a PCIII. There is "no doubt" that the yosh box is a cure for the leans, but it isn't the best solution for some people.

There has been allot of bikes tuned without the dyno, and there has been good results. As we all know, the fuel delivery at idle and low range is the real concern for those that keep the exhaust stock. There is no doubt that an analyzer or dyno would finely tune the FI while using the Yosh, I guess it's all in how much a person is willing to pay.;)

When are you and me going golfing!!!!!!!:twisted:

Brian
 

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Yup......I know that is what Yoshimura recommends, but by the time most people spend the money on a dyno tune and other labor, you could've pretty much bought a PCIII. There is "no doubt" that the yosh box is a cure for the leans, but it isn't the best solution for some people.

There has been allot of bikes tuned without the dyno, and there has been good results. As we all know, the fuel delivery at idle and low range is the real concern for those that keep the exhaust stock. There is no doubt that an analyzer or dyno would finely tune the FI while using the Yosh, I guess it's all in how much a person is willing to pay.;)

When are you and me going golfing!!!!!!!:twisted:

Brian
No doubt about the cost issue, B! I will be calling the shop in the morning to finalize costs and such and hopefully I can get out of there without spending the cost of the PCIII! I was originally told "about $60" for dyno time so I'll be curious to see what it will really be. I'm hoping that I can get a break if all they have to do is run the dyno and let me do the tweaking on the box. Hell, I might be right were I need to be after the first Yoshing. I figured that I might as well wait to check until I had the box on hand in case it needed further tweaking. Besides, tuning on the dyno will be kinda fun to see...

As far as the golf goes, my schedule is wide open most of the time. I just do the one day, two day off firefighter thing. Give me a couple days notice and I'm usually good to go. You're the one doing the Monday-Friday thing...:rolleyes:
 

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If you can get out of there for $60 and a correctly tuned FI system...than that would rock!!!:cool: Doubt that many others can get such a good deal as you, but ya just never know.

Maybe you will be the Yosh box guru after it is all said and done.

As for my work schedule...you know that I am almost always free from morning to mid afternoon, Mon-Fri. Be sure to let us all know how the dyno and yosh tune goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hmm

I was thinking they were full of it. Seems like a lot of people get good results from the yosh box without all the testing. I would love the pcIII but just cant see spending the 300 duckets for the deal. I did the throttle body sync and removed the secondaries but am still getting some hessitation/surging in the low rpms under 40mph. My last hope is that the FI remapping will fix the problem. If that doesn't work I'm going to need some other advice. That or a klr I guess. Those bikes may not have the juice but they are like clock work!
 

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Well most dyno-jobs (especially if they want your bike for 3 days) are going to cost right around that much. You don't need a dyno for a Yosh. Can it help? Sure. Is it required? Hell no... most people here (and on the other forum) are using virtually the same settings. +1.5-2% at idle, +5% on the low range. That's it. All you are doing is trying to get rid of the lean surge, not turn your Strom into a drag bike. You can tell when the surge is gone simply by riding the bike around the parking lot. What I've done with the Strom's I've Yosh'd is set the idle to +2.5%, ride it to make sure the surge is gone, then start dialing it back at .2% intervals until it starts to appear again. Go back one setting, and you are "dialed in". Then add 5% at the low range, re-do your TBS and you will have a very well behaved 1k. I also recommend doing this during the summer time, preferably on hot day. Some folks that Yosh'd during the winter months have had the "leans" crop back up when the temps rise in the heat of the summer.

Or, as Big B said - "You could just buy a PCIII and be done with it". We both used the Yosh method for over a year - then went to a PCIII and haven't looked back. It really is the "ULTIMATE" solution for the bike.
 

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Some folks that Yosh'd during the winter months have had the "leans" crop back up when the temps rise in the heat of the summer.
OK, so what info am I missing...
Less fuel is needed when it's warmer, more when it's cooler, because the change in air density- more dense when cooler. Do these bikes tend to overcompensate for temp changes?
 

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Yes, the bike will attempt to compensate for the change in ambient air - to a certain degree. It's not so much "over" compensating, as it "under" compenstates - the stock FI mapping will only allow so much fuel to be delivered, so when the ambient temps rise to a certain level, there is only so much fuel to be "had" in regards to the map that's programmed. So when it gets hot, and the ECU says it need less fuel, the FI system doesn't give it all the fuel it needs thanks to the lean programming mandated by the EPA. So a bike that runs fairly well in the wintertime can often suffer from lean surge, hesitation and even stalling when the weather gets hotter b/c the FI map adjusts to the ambient air and won't give it enough fuel.

I think I said that somewhat clearly!! If it doesn't make sense I'll try to clarify.
 

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Many can get a good "out of the box" ignition and it will be better than the stocker. But if your going to spend money on the upgrade, save yourself some time and hassle. Get the unit optimized on the dyno. You will be glad you did as they can fine tune the air/fuel ratio, and ignition timing to get the most out of what your paying for.
When viewing the dyno chart, be sure to look for a smooth and continous line without any jags or abrupt changes form the bottom of the curve to the top. This is the fine tuning that can be dial out in most case and will give you more in the height of your dyno curve.
Also try to pick a day when the temps and humidity are average for your area. As these varibles affect the tuning process.
 

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Yes, the bike will attempt to compensate for the change in ambient air - to a certain degree. It's not so much "over" compensating, as it "under" compenstates - the stock FI mapping will only allow so much fuel to be delivered, so when the ambient temps rise to a certain level, there is only so much fuel to be "had" in regards to the map that's programmed. So when it gets hot, and the ECU says it need more fuel, the FI system doesn't give it all the fuel it needs thanks to the lean programming mandated by the EPA. So a bike that runs fairly well in the wintertime can often suffer from lean surge, hesitation and even stalling when the weather gets hotter b/c the FI map won't adjust and give it enough fuel.

I think I said that somewhat clearly!! If it doesn't make sense I'll try to clarify.
Sorry, but you have this backward. When it gets warmer, you need less fuel, not more. I would be willing to bet that the ECU is overcompensating for temperature.
 

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Many can get a good "out of the box" ignition and it will be better than the stocker. But if your going to spend money on the upgrade, save yourself some time and hassle. Get the unit optimized on the dyno. You will be glad you did as they can fine tune the air/fuel ratio, and ignition timing to get the most out of what your paying for.
When viewing the dyno chart, be sure to look for a smooth and continous line without any jags or abrupt changes form the bottom of the curve to the top. This is the fine tuning that can be dial out in most case and will give you more in the height of your dyno curve.
Also try to pick a day when the temps and humidity are average for your area. As these varibles affect the tuning process.
I totally agree! If you want the best performance, dyno the thing. Otherwise, you are guessing at best.
I see a lot of misinformation on here about tuning in general. There is some very good information to be had by reading the manual for the "megasquirt" DIY FI computer.
http://www.megamanual.com/v22manual/mtabcon.htm
 

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If you can get out of there for $60 and a correctly tuned FI system...than that would rock!!!:cool: Doubt that many others can get such a good deal as you, but ya just never know.
Well it's official, if I go the dyno route then I'm in PCIII territory. I just got off the phone and they quoted "$175 to $200"! I'm not sure where the around $60 came from (probably my delusioned mind...), so I'll be using the butt dyno and start saving my pennies for a PCIII!

So if anyone wants to tweak their bike, PM me and we can get it done. All I ask is that you donate $10 to John from the other site (and maybe some to Brendan as well) per his request.

Later
 

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Sorry, but you have this backward. When it gets warmer, you need less fuel, not more. I would be willing to bet that the ECU is overcompensating for temperature.
The IAT sensor "does" tell the ECU whether it is hot or cold oustide, and helps determine the fuel mixture. That is why when it is hot outside, allot of people have put a resistor inline with the IAT to make it "think" it is cooler outside. Guess what that does?? Many Stroms run fine in cooler temps, but run like poop when it gets hot. The debate of whether or not these bikes are TOO LEAN should not even be a debate.

Allot of these bikes are too lean....plain and simple. But there are cures guys and gals, it just depends on you to take the ball and run with it.;) I personally wouldn't want to burn up my valves prematurely.......how bout you?
 

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Well it's official, if I go the dyno route then I'm in PCIII territory. I just got off the phone and they quoted "$175 to $200"! I'm not sure where the around $60 came from (probably my delusioned mind...), so I'll be using the butt dyno and start saving my pennies for a PCIII!

So if anyone wants to tweak their bike, PM me and we can get it done. All I ask is that you donate $10 to John from the other site (and maybe some to Brendan as well) per his request.

Later
That sucks Steve, I figured that low price was too good to be true.:twisted: Hey look at it this way, you'll have a PCIII soon and won't have to worry about your bike running bad anymore. Be sure to contact Fuelmoto when the time comes, they will get you hooked up.

Brian
 

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The IAT sensor "does" tell the ECU whether it is hot or cold oustide, and helps determine the fuel mixture. That is why when it is hot outside, allot of people have put a resistor inline with the IAT to make it "think" it is cooler outside. Guess what that does?? Many Stroms run fine in cooler temps, but run like poop when it gets hot. The debate of whether or not these bikes are TOO LEAN should not even be a debate.

Allot of these bikes are too lean....plain and simple. But there are cures guys and gals, it just depends on you to take the ball and run with it.;) I personally wouldn't want to burn up my valves prematurely.......how bout you?
If you had bothered to read the context of what was being discussed, you would see that I was not saying anything at all about these bikes in their stock tune.
The debate was about these two statements:
"I also recommend doing this during the summer time, preferably on hot day. Some folks that Yosh'd during the winter months have had the "leans" crop back up when the temps rise in the heat of the summer."
"Yes, the bike will attempt to compensate for the change in ambient air - to a certain degree. It's not so much "over" compensating, as it "under" compenstates - the stock FI mapping will only allow so much fuel to be delivered, so when the ambient temps rise to a certain level, there is only so much fuel to be "had" in regards to the map that's programmed. So when it gets hot, and the ECU says it need more fuel, the FI system doesn't give it all the fuel it needs thanks to the lean programming mandated by the EPA."
We were talking about tuning, and ECM temperature-related variability AFTER remapping. The information given above is just wrong! If the bike is retuned during the winter (by ADDING fuel to the map) and it ends up lean in the summer, the ECM is obviously over-compensating for the temperature change, since it needs to pull fuel out for the warmer temps. It is taking too much out. Either that, or it is richening too much for winter, and when tuned it is tuned lean.
What would really be interesting is to come up with an inline "sensor adapter" that would allow easy temperature adjustment. It seems that the temperature mapping is off. By playing with the sensor input, you could easily fool the ECM, and even out this temp-related variability.
 

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Sorry, but you have this backward. When it gets warmer, you need less fuel, not more. I would be willing to bet that the ECU is overcompensating for temperature.
I just re-read what I typed and yes I posted without reading first.. I was trying to say too many things too quickly before I ran out the door. Please check my edited post. I was trying to say that the ECU pulls out too much fuel out of an already lean map in the hotter temps, so your phrasing of "overcompensating" is somewhat accurate.

Sorry for any confusion there, folks!
 

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No big deal... just trying to clarify.
I really think it would be easy to make a device that would plug inline with the temp sensor and fool the ECM into thinking it was colder or warmer. If anyone has any interest, I would be willing to build something for someone to try.
 

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No big deal... just trying to clarify.
I really think it would be easy to make a device that would plug inline with the temp sensor and fool the ECM into thinking it was colder or warmer. If anyone has any interest, I would be willing to build something for someone to try.
I know that some people have rigged a connector, which allows them to quickly switch different resistors depending on temp changes. I hear it does a pretty good job of fooling the ECM in thinking it is cooler or hotter outside. You think you "might" look into that? Although just simply fixing the lean fuel map might make better sense.:mrgreen:
 
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