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Discussion Starter #1
Got lazy, 15k and 4 rear tires and never really checked the spokes. Just found 2 missing nipples on the rear. Keep an eye on them - I plan on checking them with an Allen wrench each oil change now.

 

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Maybe some of the dreaded blue locktite? i used to take a screwdriver of small hammer to the spokes of my Honda and Ariel and listen to the tink of the spokes.
If it didn't tink in unison with the rest of the spokes idt was time for an adjustment. Those are far from tink. Those are even below a tunk.
 

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I'd guess that you have never checked them. They do need to be checked, particularly as they first bed in from new.

I would not use any sort of loctite. It may very well distort the sound that you need to hear, as the sound of all the spokes needs to be equal as that tells you that the tension on all is equal.
Take a spanner, or a screwdriver, and run it over the spokes like playing a xylophone and listen to the tones of the different spokes.
A clear tink is good. A tunk is not. They should all sound the same. Tighten all the tunkers until they do.
 

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Not like you aren't hard on bikes Meef!!! :grin2:I have checked mine several times, so far in 20K nothing loose or missing......but I'll check again soon, thanks for sharing and hope you’re well.
 

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Big B, it's the lost coast that Meef is near. You can lose a lot of things there including spoke parts.
In the woods coming back to the highway my GPS got lost since the trees blocked the satellite signals.
A very dangerous place!
 

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My previous bike was a 2012 S10 and I lost a spoke nipple on my rear wheel in the first 2k, luckily no damage was done. Also had quite a few loose spokes and checked them regularly with still the odd loose spoke in the rear wheel with 20k plus on the clock. I say this because the wheels on the XT look almost identical to those on the S10???
 

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We S-10 riders know all about this. Common issue. Just check and tighten (especially the rear wheel) when the bike is new until the spokes bed in and then they will be fine for a along time.

Tip from the S-10 boys is to take zip ties and place one where each pair of spokes cross in the middle. I have done both my wheels with black zip ties. Then if the nipple comes off, the spoke will stay put and not damage a wheel.
 

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A word of caution- spokes cannot just be arbitrarily tightened until they "ting" like the other spokes. I come from the world of bicycle wheel spokes, and I'll admit to having very little experience with spoked motorcycle wheels. But spokes on any kind of wheel provide structure to the overall wheel by tension, and a change at any one spoke does affect the overall wheel system (bicycle wheels are very sensitive to spoke issues). Spokes are evenly spaced, laced in patterns, and tension needs to be fairly well equalized for optimum structural strength and to maintain true in the round wheel shape (equal radius from the axle to all points on the rim circumference) and without creating side-to-side run out.

I'm guessing Suzuki and/or the wheel manufacturer (if not Suz.) have some sort of spoke tension and nipple torque settings. Motorcycle wheel hubs and rims are a lot beefier than a bicycle's, and probably do a better job of masking spoke related problems, but those problems can still haunt you.

If finding a problem as shown here, I'd go so far to recommend a visit to a mechanic trained on servicing spoked motorcycle wheels. There is a lot of power, speed, and rotational mass at play and those spokes are doing a lot of work.

What does the factory service manual say about spoke servicing and settings?

Steve.
 

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A word of caution- spokes cannot just be arbitrarily tightened until they "ting" like the other spokes.................edited..................What does the factory service manual say about spoke servicing and settings? Steve.
This is a motorcycle and not a bike. The wheels are much more robust. What you will find on these wheels is 1 or 2 spokes will loosen early on, the rear especially, then they are pretty much done moving.

The manual only lists a spoke torque value for the nipple. Not much other advice. The trick is to "ping" all the spokes every couple of rides for first 1,000 miles or so. Catch the offenders early.

What I do, if I find a loose spoke. First, I put a piece of tape on it. Then I retention it until it "pings" like its neighbors to the left and right. I spin the wheel and check for lateral run out, especially where the taped spoke is. Next I go 180 degrees to the opposing side of the rim (as in top to bottom, not left to right) and "ping" the 2 or 3 spokes either side of directly across from the one I tightened. Usually all is well and I am done. I ride the bike a time or two then re-"ping" the taped spoke to see how it is behaving. If my taped spoke is still fine, then I start worrying about other issues like what is the best beer brewed.

This is on a Tenere (which uses the same rims and spokes), which is much heavier and has much more torque than a 650 XT.
 

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I am liking my cast rims even more now. :)

People complain about chain maintenance all the time, now they also have to do spoke maintenance. I guess it gives you something to do when your not riding.

Meh it's a quick check on occasion, I believe the OP is the first to make mention of an issue thus far? The spokes started with the 15XT, and plenty beyond are out there world wide. :smile2:
 

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I love my spokes. On my 2015 Tenere, I managed to hit a fence-post with the front wheel. Long story that involves a deer and riding somewhat tired when returning from a long road trip.

Anyways, the hit was hard enough to bend both fork legs and one handlebar clamp on the triple tree. The front wheel laughed it off. I rode the poor girl home with the handlebars pointing 30 degrees to the left. Checked the wheel while repairing the bike, no loose spokes and no run out.

And besides, spokes just look bitchin......
 

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I thought I was reading another BMW thread for a minute..........


Spokes are wonderful! But like anything that gives a performance increase it may take a bit of care to keep in shape. Spoke wheels ride better, are less likely to bend on objects, and are lighter for the strength they have. But they do need to be inspected once in a while.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I ordered 6 nipples from my indy shop:



Suzuki part #55326-11J00, $3.00 ea

Nipples on front and rear are the same and take a 5mm allen, or you could use a nipple wrench on the exposed square shoulder. I replaced the two missing on the back and found about 4 (out of 32) that were very loose. Front was fine.
 

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Thanks for that info Mark, how you liking that 1000 compared to the 650’s you’ve owned?
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Thanks for that info Mark, how you liking that 1000 compared to the 650’s you’ve owned?
I like it, Brian. It's a fun motorcycle. I tend to ride it faster than I should - I didn't really have that problem with the 650, or at least not to the extreme that I tend to ride this thing. Really the only thing I don't like about it in comparison to the 650 is it's around town manners, it just feels like I can't ever find the right gear for slower city speeds. The 650 was a lot more smooth at lower speeds. But at 55+ there's no comparison!

As you probably recall, I was a bit of a whore for a while... since 2012 I've had 3 DL650s, a Tenere, an AT, a 1150 GS, a old DL1000 beater, and this DL1000 (in fairness though we also moved cross country and I sold my bikes when we left Ohio). That's not counting the small bore dual sports that have come and gone. But I have legitimately ridden them all even if I kept them short term.

^ The point of all this is that of all those I'd put the DL1000 at the top of the list of bikes I've owned. It's an excellent machine for the money. I don't see myself selling it anytime soon, it's probably a keeper.
 

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WOW now that is "honest" feedback for the new Vee, in particular compared to AT and Super Ten which you have also owned. You know your bikes for sure, and my riding skills pale in comparison to yours. :smile2:I doubt most would argue if they were truly being honest, when you compare for the money, how awesome these bikes are to their direct competition.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
WOW now that is "honest" feedback for the new Vee, in particular compared to AT and Super Ten which you have also owned. You know your bikes for sure, and my riding skills pale in comparison to yours. :smile2:I doubt most would argue if they were truly being honest, when you compare for the money, how awesome these bikes are to their direct competition.
Oh shut up! LOL

I realized I didn't really answer your question about Vee v Wee... Vee because I have one now, but the Wee was not lacking in anything (except maybe raw grunt) and I'd be happy with one of them again, too. I'll keep the 1000 because I have it but if it got stolen tomorrow I'd still consider a 650 to replace it and it would be a game time decision between those two.
 

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I would guess that trying to set the tension of spokes by sound can screw up a motorcycle wheel just like a bicycle wheel. The spokes establish the run-out (both lateral and roundness) and the dish (lateral relationship of the rim and hub) of the wheel. I would use some kind of indicator as I was doing it. It's a machine, not a piano.
 
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