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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all.

Electrical tools and skills help needed. Getting ready to add major elec components to my '12 650 adv. Yet Ive never learned to properly work dc power. Hopefully adventuretech Rick will be able to supply my goods to install. So that leaves me with the installation.

Ive read many threads, but what I really need from this community is a list of the skills I should develop and the tools I should acquire.

I'll be installing a dash, tankbag charging station, heated grips, aux lights, etc.

My winter trip is 4 weeks long; so smaller may be better if ssomething needs to travel.

Thanks
John
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Seems kinda simple - slip heat shrink over a wire, western union wire twist, solder, and slide heat shrink over soldered wires and heat.

Anyone ever use a solder iron in their tool kit? Just carry crimpers, butt connectors, and 33 tape?

I know to use plastics ties to bundle wires.

More thoughts later.

John
 

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there are crimpers and there are crimpers, don't waste your time or money on cheapies

soldering tools, use higher wattage iron for heavier gauge wire, one size does not fit all

if the soldering iron is too small it will take too long to heat the wire and heat will travel into insulated portion and melt insulation

if the iron is too big, it will melt the solder before it heats the wire

split seam conduit is handy



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Each item needs its negative side connected to the negative post of the battery, not to the bike frame. Each one does not have to run individually. You can run one good sized wire (#14 or #12) from the battery negative post up to a convenient location in the front of the bike. Use a crimp-on ring terminal for the battery end. At the front end of this negative bus wire you're running, put another ring terminal. For the negative wire from each gizmo, put a ring terminal on them, then use a screw and self-locking nut to connect them all together. Make the ends long enough so you can pull them out of the cowling to connect another, then tuck the excess out of the way and cable-tie it into place.

Each positive wire to each device needs to be run separately with wire size suitable for the electrical load the item will draw and a suitable sized fuse installed in the line close to the battery. Post the amperage or wattage for each, and we'll give you the sizes. Or, install a fuse box.
http://easternbeaver.com/Main/Bike_Specific/VStrom/vstrom.html#pc8


Note that the color of the plastic cuff relates to the wire size it'll take, and this is on the package. Red, small. Blue, medium. Yellow, big. You also need to get the correct hole size for the screw you'll use. If you get too many things stacked on the battery posts, buy longer screws for the battery posts. When using the crimp terminals, crimp them on, then test them with a good tug. If they come apart, start over.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for sharing gentlemen. Good stuff. Will get the tools, parts, etc and get ready to install the EB PC8 and headlight relay before next week's major installment of dash, charging ports, aux lights and more.

Thanks for linking your own learning thread L Smoke; very helpful.

John
 

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I carry soldering tools, I'm a USN trained electronic tech, but on the bike I use Anderson Powerpoles for DC connections. The crimper was $40, and I use it for everything, no fuse box for me.
 

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I carry soldering tools, I'm a USN trained electronic tech, but on the bike I use Anderson Powerpoles for DC connections. The crimper was $40, and I use it for everything, no fuse box for me.
Nice to have those skills. True diy'er. :yesnod:
 
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