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I've been looking at how-tos on wiring in auxiliary lights and keep seeing differing instructions, specifically with respect to relays. Are relays only needed if you want to disable the high beams, or is there another purpose?

I have a fuse block installed that is switched via relay off the heated grip connector. Could I just wire the auxiliary lights to that and have them work? (see diagram) I don't care about disabling high beams, I just want to be able to turn the lights on as needed.
 

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Aux Lights

I've been looking at how-tos on wiring in auxiliary lights and keep seeing differing instructions, specifically with respect to relays. Are relays only needed if you want to disable the high beams, or is there another purpose?

I have a fuse block installed that is switched via relay off the heated grip connector. Could I just wire the auxiliary lights to that and have them work? (see diagram) I don't care about disabling high beams, I just want to be able to turn the lights on as needed.
You could run the lights that way but it is not the correct or safe way to do it...Relays are there to carry full current from the battery and the switch is low current "Control" voltage to fire the relay contacts. It is good that your fuse block is fused, but the individual light circuit( or anything else) should be fused as well.
 

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The idea of a relay is to isolate the switch circuit from the light circuit. It has charged a little now with low amp LEDs. Sometime you can run them without a relay because they draw so few amps.. The relay allows the switch to only have `200ma going through it, and not the multiple amps that lights draw.

In your drawing I would replace your on/off switch with a relay. Connecent the #30 to the fuse block , #87 to the light, and #85 to a ground. Connect a wire from the same +12v to a switch then to #86.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The idea of a relay is to isolate the switch circuit from the light circuit. It has charged a little now with low amp LEDs. Sometime you can run them without a relay because they draw so few amps.. The relay allows the switch to only have `200ma going through it, and not the multiple amps that lights draw.

In your drawing I would replace your on/off switch with a relay. Connecent the #30 to the fuse block , #87 to the light, and #85 to a ground. Connect a wire from the same +12v to a switch then to #86.
I think I get what you're saying. But where do I run the switch on 86?

 

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Discussion Starter #6
I see now ... Just had to look at a relay to see what you meant. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So can 30 and 86 be attached to the same terminal (12V + source) on the fuse block?
 

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Here are a couple of thread that might be useful.

A ready made wiring harness for the V-Strom three wires to the bike. Red wire to battery positive, black wire ti Battery negative, and white wire to any switched source.
I know it's over a year old thead; but, the information is relevant to my question. Would the terminals of my Eastern Beaver PC-8 be considered "a switched source"? If yes, in light of the fact I have, for each circuit in my PC-8, a hole for the red wire and a hole for the black wire, where would the white wire then go? I hope that makes sense.
 

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The EB PC-8 has both 'switched' and 'hot 24/7' connections. Their instructions tell you which is which for the individual 8 circuits.

If your talking about the feed wires to the box, I'd have to research since it was 3 yrs ago when I put together.

Maybe tell us a little more on what part of the overall system you need help.
 

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spike55_BMW, if you look at what I quoted from richlandrick, I think that answers your question. He states: "A ready made wiring harness for the V-Strom three wires to the bike. Red wire to battery positive, black wire ti Battery negative, and white wire to any switched source.".

My EB PC8 has six switched and two hot connections. I don't want the hot connections. I want the switched. In light of that, based on what Rick said above, my question, once again was, and is: "Would the terminals of my Eastern Beaver PC-8 be considered "a switched source"? If yes, in light of the fact I have, for each circuit in my PC-8, a hole for the red wire and a hole for the black wire, where would the white wire then go? I hope that makes sense."

Another way to put it would be, if using Rick's V-strom wiring harness, which I will be doing, I know where to put the red wire (power side) and I know where to put the black wire (ground/negative side);but, since the PC8 is my "swithched source" where does the white wire go?" Thanks in advance.
 

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I just installed auxiliary lights two days ago: The switched source wire should be connected to any 12V source which is only hot when the ignition is on. I connected mine to the accessory plug behind the radiator by soldering it to the 12V side of the connector terminal supplying my heated grips.
 

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BigSky -- Most auto & m/c wiring harnesses are very similar. I didn't find a wiring diagram at the AdventureTech site in my cursory scan for it, but Rick's comments suggest a common configuration. Look at your wiring harness and confirm the relay wire connections:


  • Pin 85 = black wire, which you'll connect to your switched PC8 negative terminal.
  • Pin 30/51 = red wire, which you'll connect to the same switched PC8 but positive terminal
  • Pin 86 = white wire, which runs first to the SPST switch and then to...a switched power source (more on this in a moment).
  • Pin 87 = red wire that runs to the far end of the harness and which you'll connect to your aux lights. (You'll also have a black / ground wire at the far end of the harness which you'll connect to your aux lights.)
If all that checks out, see this link Rick posted. Note the first diagram at the top of the page, but ignore the top-right box within the diagram. Your white wire is the same as the orange wire.

In this case, I don't think it matters to which switched power source you connect the white (orange) wire, and I can't think of a reason why you couldn't connect the white wire to the same PC8 positive terminal as the red wire (if they fit).

The white wire's only purpose: carrying very low current to energize the relay and close the circuit between pins 30/51 and 87, which will turn on the aux lights. If the switched power is off, nothing gets power (neither red nor white). If the switched power is on (and both red and white have power), but the SPST switch is off, the aux lights don't get power. The aux lights only turn on when switched power is on and the SPST switch is on.
 

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Thanks thirdofthree. So, if I understand this correctly, even using a PC-8 or other such fuse block to get my power, I still need to tie into/tap into another switched source wire. Is that correct? If correct, does that only apply to accessories which I wish to have their own separate switch?

I know there's a lot of crossover in my questions; but, I apologize for that. Going a step further, assuming a "yes" answer to both of the prior questions in this post, If I don't want a separate switch for my auxiliary lights (just on/off with the ignition) what then do I do with the white wire in my example/orange in your example?
 

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Hook the red wire and the white wire to the same positive output on your switched PC8 if you don't want/need a manual off/on switch for the lights. The white wire will close the circuit within the relay so the red wire can provide power to your running lights.
 

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Thanks gdrew. I appreciate it. I'm learning more and more from those of you "in the know" all the time.

It's interesting that, in most of these mechanical type "how-to" threads, those in the know often skip what is very basic to them but is completely foreign to those of us trying to learn. A prime example is, I always read "tap in to a switched/live wire" with no explanation of a) how to locate such a wire; and, b) how to tap in to such a wire. It is just assumed we know.

It would be akin to me, in explaining how to reload rifle ammunition, telling someone to de-prime, full length size, de-bur, re-prime, dispense powder and insert bullet and you're done. Simple. For those of you who know reloading, you see what I mean. For those of you who don't, you would need me to explain how to do each of those steps which includes multiple different steps of how-to for each.

Thanks to all of those who tolerate my/our simple questions.
 

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I hear ya BigSky, so many guys giving great advice on this forum that are way way smarter than me. Sometimes I wish they would type slower so I can better comprehend what they are saying:grin2:.

Not to worry, I just come back and keep asking and they keep happily educating. This is one of the best groups you could ask for on the WWW!
 

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See attached for 5 common scenarios (well...not sure how common #5 is, but I do see it pop up on occasion). The distinctions between the scenarios: when and how to turn the lights on / off, and the power source in play for each.

Hopefully #1 and #2 will answer your most recent questions, BigSky.

Thanks to johnofchar and his original wiring diagrams that I simply mocked up a bit.
 

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