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Hey Guys,

I have a 2011 Wee and unfortunately have about 3 months of winter to contend with. The bike will be parked outside in my open carport. I plan to cover it, but it will have to sit out in the cold temps. I've already lubed the chain and added fuel stabilizer. Should I pull the battery and store it inside, or is it good enough just to start the bike a couple of times a month and let it idle for a few minutes? If it warms up enough, I can ride it around town a bit just to circulate some fuel and keep a charge on the battery, but sometimes that's not an option for weeks on end. Any other suggestions for the winter? Thanks.
 

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either plug the battery into a battery tender or pull it - a battery tender is preferred. don't start it unless you are going to get it up to operating temp for a while - i.e. ride. you will just create condensation where you don't want it. I just parked mine- plugged in the battery, full tank of fuel (never bother with stabilizer for 2-3 months) threw the cover on it. When a nice day comes (or when winter ends), I pull the cover off unplug it and hit 'go'. I assume you are in eastern Wa? otherwise you wouldn't have winter - just rain. the climate here is similar to eastern Wa. good luck.
 

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This is about to start a long running debate like the never ending oil debates.

For the battery, just connect a Battery Tender. A properly charged battery won't freeze at temps you'll likely see anywhere in the continental U.S. It would be a good time to clean and prep the battery terminals. (See google). If you bring it inside, be careful about charging it inside. The maintenance free battery on the stroms is kind of sealed. But it can still emit explosive/flammable gas when charged, especially at a high rate. Never remove the sealing strip to add anything to the battery. It says that right on the battery but some people think they know better than Yuasa or Furikawa who made the battery.

It's probably better to NOT start the bike than to let it run for a just a few minutes. You know all that moisture that drips out of the pipes as it's warming up? Some of that can get past the rings and contaminate the oil. If you can ride it long enough to get the oil and coolant up to normal temps for 15 minutes or longer that might be better. Airplane guys tend to agree that if you're not going to let the oil temp get up high enough for the condensation to evaporate from the oil, it's better not to start it at all. There is an argument for at least cranking the engine to distribute oil onto cylinder walls. But the coating on them is pretty resistant to corrosion for moisture anyway. Whatever you do, don't fire it up and let it stand stationary for 15 minutes. Some of the engine will still not get up to operating temperature but some of the exhaust will get extremely hot.

Treating the gas is good. Go with a brand that mentions protection from ethanol problems. Any brand sold by the bike manufacturers or outboard manufacturers is good. I've seen great and terrible results from Stabil so I won't recommend that one. When you pour in some stabilizer, go ride for 5 minutes or more to ensure you mixed it in the tank well and it made it to the injectors. Do that on a full tank too so there's less room in there for condensation to accumulate.

If you use a cover outside, DON'T seal it up tight. You know how everything rusts in one of those cheap metal sheds? The same environment develops under a tightly sealed cover. Keep the bottom open so it can ventilate.

Mice are another problem to avoid. They can cause $$$ of damage to wiring. We had to replace an ECU on a YZF-R1 because a mouse ate insulation off of the wires going to an injector. Unfortunately some wire strands were intact and the 2 wires got together. Can you tie a cat to your kickstand? Just kidding cat people. Something to discourage mice from making a condo in your airbox or under your tank would be a good idea. Mothballs might be an option for you???

Use your center stand. The rear tire benefits of course. But the front doesn't have as much weight on it either. Even if a dent develops during storage, they usually disappear after 10-20 miles and warm temps.

I don't know where you live, but getting it out and riding it is best. If you don't have some good winter gear, get some. With a cold weather jacket and over pants, 30-35 degrees for 30 minutes is not a problem (even without electric heat). It has to be decent stuff though and a few layers underneath. A pair of coveralls isn't going to work.
 

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Stabilized Gas should be topped off right to the cap

I usually pump the tires up like plus 10 psi.

Bike should be put to bed hot and not started until it can be made hot again which usually is stated an actual 20 minute ride.

Some actuality FILL the crankcase with fresh cheap oil right to the filler to also minimize breathing and cover all gears/bearings etc to prevent rust.
STOP would have to be drained BEFORE motor turns again << danger.

I always give shots of fogging oil in all orifices. It is now sold at Walmart under the Stabil name.
 

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Should I pull the battery and store it inside.
Pull the battery and store it inside. Regardless of whether you charge it or not it will be better for it inside.

Put it on a battery tender or charge it up a couple of times over the winter.
 

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Apropos I had to awaken my tractor/snow blower today. It was stored similarly to described above and she started right up and ran like it had run yesterday
 
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