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Looking for some input as I commute year-round in Dallas area having lived in Southern California the past 15 years.

It's been hanging below freezing (with and without wind chill). My finger tips are getting very cold even on a short commute. Looking for the most cost effective and effective way to keep digits from freezing.

I wear liners within my winter gloves. A friend who bicycles says I need to buy Gore (not Gore-tex) liners to cut out the wind.

I am wondering how much the stock hand guards will help. I think the metal levers (clutch and brake) are the culprits. Would leather wraps be enough (or in combo with hand guards)?

I'm not certain heated grips are the answer as it isn't my palms getting cold... mainly index and middle fingers that I use with the levers.

What are you who ride in freezing/near freezing weather wear? Are there special snowmobile gloves?

Thanks in advance,
Derek
 

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Hand guards and heated gloves.........that's it.
 

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I've tried heated grips, hand guards, hippo hands, glove liners...still freezing off my finger tips.

The closest I have come to comfort in below freezing weather is a good pair of winter gloves. I walked into a local bike dealership and just asked for the warmest gloves they sold, then gritted my teeth as I handed over my credit card. They were a vast improvement over any of my former (admittedly cheap) gloves.

So now I have my super expensive winter gloves, hand guards and heated grips and I get by. I think the only improvement I could make would be to get some heated gloves but I have no experience with them and I am reluctant to risk that amount of money.

The hippo hands, strangely, did not result in significant improvement.
 

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I've had good luck with Klim Inversion gloves now I see they make the Inversion pro's they are like your friend recommended they don't let the wind through very light weight
 

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The closest I've been able to come to having warm hands has been layering a pair of those stretchy thermal gloves under leather winter riding gauntlets. On a long ride in sub-freezing weather, my fingertips will still get cold, but that's the combination that comes as close as I've ever found to toasty hands.

I've never had heated grips, so those may work just fine and I wouldn't know, so I'll bow to the greater experience of those that have them.
 

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I do 10 min warm up exercises to get the blood flowing before riding. Keeping hydrated is important for proper blood flow. I will also throw on another layer to keep my core temp up so that I'm a little too warm walking but just right riding.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I rode to my dealer this past Saturday... It's about a 45 minute ride, and when I left the house it was just around 20°F. I have heavy duty A* Tech Road winter gloves, and 20 minutes into the ride, my fingertips were red and hurting. I figure *NO* glove by itself is going to fix that situation, on a bike.

I'm not getting heated gear in Atlanta (where you *may* need it just a few days out of the year).

A friend suggested these... Thought it was a good idea... activate them, and slip one into each glove for those mandatory freezing weather rides. I imagine the heat has to radiate to some degree up into the fingers if you get the thing as high as possible into the glove:

HeatMax HotHands Hand Warmers, 40 pairs - Walmart.com
 

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I do 10 min warm up exercises to get the blood flowing before riding. Keeping hydrated is important for proper blood flow. I will also throw on another layer to keep my core temp up so that I'm a little too warm walking but just right riding.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
Those are good points that are not often made. I do very well with heated grips plus hippo hands (which sadly are no longer made). The trick is to turn the grip heat up relatively high to begin with and then turn it down incrementally to a steady steady state of comfort. If you let your hands get cold, it takes a while to get them warm again, even when running max grip heat. Anyway, I just ordered a pair of Firstgear heated gloves, not because I find it necessary for the Strom, but because I am pretty sure I am going to replace the Strom with an FJR, on which the hippo hands won't fit right. If that is to be the case, I will be selling my beloved hippo hands, plus the Vee, luggage, and other farkles.
 

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Best I've found is fingerless cycling gloves under normal gloves. Those don't add much bulk and the open weave traps a layer of air between your hand and the outer glove.
With handguards that's enough to keep the centre of my hand warm and the blood flowing to my fingers.

Admitted, doesn't often get cold enough to care here ;), but it has been tested with snow on the ground.

Pete
 

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I have at least 30 pairs of gloves. My favorite winter non-heated gloves are Tourmaster Winter Elite. Under 30 degrees, it's gotta be heated gloves for me -- bottom line: it really depends on how long you're gonna be out.
 

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I am wondering how much the stock hand guards will help.
Thanks in advance,
Derek
Stock hand guards help a lot.
I am commuting in same area than you (this morning 22f) and I have no problems with had guards and good winter gloves.
Stock hand guard are easy to install and take off if you don't like them on hot weather.
 

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Warm?

So far, I have grip warmers that I hope I never have to do without again and I use wind-proof, water-proof textile gloves that have an insulation liner. But I don't use the liner. The gloves, therefore fit me really loosely (dexterity suffers some) and has a nice warm layer of air inside that can circulate to my fingers. If I keep my palms warm on the grips, the fingers get some warmth from blood flow AND air flow. Not absolutely perfect but works pretty well for me and I have a problem with my hands getting cold off the bike. Gauntlets help with keeping wind from going up your sleeves.
 

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I use standard winter gauntlets , that are good down to around 35. Below that , I have a pair of snowmoble style mit gauntlet. I have ridden into the single digits twice in the last 2-3 weeks here in Ga. and high teens , and low twenties seems to be our winter this season. Am I warm ? No , but I'm not freezing like I would be with the 1st gloves. My core is warm , as is the rest of me. I am eyeballing heated grips , even though I live in Georgia. 70.00 is a small price to pay for comfort.
 

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I am eyeballing heated grips , even though I live in Georgia. 70.00 is a small price to pay for comfort.
I use them all year, great in the rain or if you have arthritis in your hands.
 

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I have at least 30 pairs of gloves. My favorite winter non-heated gloves are Tourmaster Winter Elite. Under 30 degrees, it's gotta be heated gloves for me -- bottom line: it really depends on how long you're gonna be out.
+1 on the Tourmaster Winter Elites. I have worn mine down to 27°F with a poly type liner glove and my hand and fingers have been fine on a 20 minute commute. Now the rest of me about froze. :mrgreen:
 

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For me hand guards and Gerbing heated gloves but even with that combination at 25 degrees certain fingers start to get cold.
 

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The chemical heat packs work, but maybe the expense is too high for everyday commuting. Costco sells them at a good price in a big box.

Put the heat packs on the backs of your hands inside the gloves. They warm the blood going to your finger tips. Many ski gloves have zippered compartments on the backs for the packs.

To add to Randyo's comments...wear a warm helmet liner or balaclava to keep the brain warm. Wear warm layers, maybe a heated jacket liner or vest, to keep the body core warm. This helps keep the extremities warm, but isn't the whole solution.
 

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To add to Randyo's comments...wear a warm helmet liner or balaclava to keep the brain warm. Wear warm layers, maybe a heated jacket liner or vest, to keep the body core warm. This helps keep the extremities warm, but isn't the whole solution.
Randy's the king of winter riding. I'd just add that a good addition to your layers is a windproof one. Help a lot if you're gonna be out a few hours.
 
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