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Discussion Starter #1
Today it is very windy outside. Do any of you ride in high winds or just park it for the day? Any tips for the wind riding or thoughts....
 

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Ride! It's always fun here in SoCal on the freeways when windy dodging trash cans (yes, I've seen it), bed liners, drifting RVs and trucks, and all sorts of other matter. :headbang:
 

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I ride my wife's Harley on windy days.
 

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I'm a rider too. There's too few days here in Michigan with no snow/ice or rain.

Warm rain I can handle. :) Wind I can handle too.

I tend to ride the same on windy days as I do on most other days. I just tend to move closer to the center on my lane in case a surprise gust comes along... that way there's room to move in each direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good to hear!! Today is really really windy outside and on the way home from school i was kind of shaky but on the way back to school i felt a little more comfortable in the wind. I def will keep riding to get better at wind riding
 

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I rode my ninja 250 on days when the weatherman was claiming gusts over 70MPH and that's a light bike. Main worry I had was trucks being blown out of their lanes...or over. As long as you can keep the bike upright at a stop you can ride. Just lean the bike into the wind and go.

Only real advice I have: When you have to pass through blowing sand, hit the clutch and chop the throttle to reduce the amount of dirt you suck into the engine.
 

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Remain loose on your handlebars (do not go into a death grip), keep your body loose on the seat (don't fight the bike and force it to remain bolt upright), go with the flow, and give yourself plenty of room around objects and other vehicles.

Be prepared when riding through town and intersections...a building may be blocking that wind gust, which will catch you out when passing through an intersection between buildings. Same for large trucks / 18-wheelers. You can have a good lean into the wind going, but if that truck passes you and blocks that wind, you'll need to be prepared.
 

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A tip I was given by a M/C instructor for riding wind. If you have a cross wind coming from the side, take the knee on the side the wind is coming from and stick it out to the side. The drag of the knee will help stabilize the bike from the wind. Trust me it works, and will make a big difference. The further out and more cross section, the more it works.
 

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Other than riding tips mentioned above - if you live in windy area and want your life to be easier - buy a fork brace.

When you do that and try it out - you can come here and thank me later. :)

Seriously. It does provide a LOT of improvement when faced with side winds.
 

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If you haven't already, raise the forks/lower the front of the bike. This one change (which is free and revesable if you don't like it) will make the bike more stable in crosswinds and has the addtional benifit of making it turn in more quickly in the twisties.

The best thing you can do is relax and realize the bike is going to move around a bit in the wind.


I ride in almost every condtion (exept for snow or ice on the road.) In general in very windy and gusty conditions, if there is not a lot of traffic around me, I play around with locking my throttle and taking my hand off the bars and seeing how well I can control it with moving my body around. (I'm serious here... I think Heavy can vouch that I do this.)

Go ahead and add a frok brace (I have and it's good) but try the free fix first.

..Tom
 

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Here in SoCal when the Santa Ana winds are at their worst, I will postpone a ride until they die down. But then again, I won't ride if I know it's going to rain or if my ride will end up ending at night (slightly overly cautious).

I do my best to fight the winds up around Palm Springs and the last ride out that way was too much for me. I started to figure out how to deal with them after a few miles, but was definitely tense. My rule of thumb is if the weather report says 30 miles an hour max, I will do it, but 40 - 60 miles per hour is a bit much for me personally and that last wind storm we had were as high as 70 from what I saw on the news.

Jim
 

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+1 on the fork brace.

+1 on raising the fork tubes.

I found each of those helped, and both together get things to the point where I'm comfortable riding in fairly windy conditions. My commute includes a 7-mile or so bridge with a high rise section, all of which tends to have a crosswind, especially in the afternoons. The bike still gets blown around a bit, but it's manageable. Fork brace makes it so the front end doesn't feel floppy, and when the bike does get blown by a gust it feels much more solid. Raising the tubes seems to reduce the effective windage.

The changes mentioned don't mean you can ride in anything, though. One night this winter a storm came in earlier than expected and I ended up on that same bridge, at night, driving rain and 35-45mph gusting crosswinds. It wasn't until I was on the bridge that I realized how bad it was over the open water, and it was touch and go the whole way across. Never been more unhappy on a motorcycle. So don't expect anything to make you invulnerable to crosswinds :)
 

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I rode home today in that wind. I tend to avoid riding in 30 mph+ winds as I live west of the metro area right at the point where the land flattens out. Winds 25 mph or less usually don't bother me much as I have gotten used to it. Like everything thing else, I like to get used to adverse conditions on my own terms. It would really suck to ride on a windy day when you have no other choice.
 

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Doesn't really bother me any more. It's just another riding skill you need to pick up, like riding in rain or in the dark. You have to learn to cope with wind somewhere along the way unless you want to hide in your house half the year and never go anywhere fun.

Pro tip: the fun twisty roads are usually surrounded by trees and hills that block much of the wind. There's no reason to put off a fun ride in the twisties just because it's blowing a bit.
 

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There's no reason to put off a fun ride in the twisties just because it's blowing a bit.
I often ride a very long right hand sweeper at the top of the junction of two steep ridge lines where the wind is funnelled up the valley at around 30-40 knots; running at 110kmh and leaning in, the bike will usually be blown gently but firmly upright by the time I am in the middle of the curve, making it a real effort to get it back down on line. OK when I remember to allow for it, but not good if the mind is on the scenery. The other thing I hate is ball-bearing gravel in high wind. Trailwings are not good on that surface at the best of times and in high winds it gets really touchy.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks everybody for the tips. Soon I will have another thread about adjusting the forks. Thanks again
 

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Pro tip: the fun twisty roads are usually surrounded by trees and hills that block much of the wind. There's no reason to put off a fun ride in the twisties just because it's blowing a bit.
I agree with that, however; try riding HWY 1 on the california coast (no trees when the roads near the ocean)....LOL ....Its very fun and twisty but the last time I did it, there were 50+mph wind gusts....LOL It sucked big time........
 

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I often ride a very long right hand sweeper at the top of the junction of two steep ridge lines where the wind is funnelled up the valley at around 30-40 knots; running at 110kmh and leaning in, the bike will usually be blown gently but firmly upright by the time I am in the middle of the curve, making it a real effort to get it back down on line. OK when I remember to allow for it, but not good if the mind is on the scenery. The other thing I hate is ball-bearing gravel in high wind. Trailwings are not good on that surface at the best of times and in high winds it gets really touchy.
True dat -- sometimes the terrain conspires against you, wind-wise.

And crap like trash cans, sand, tumbleweeds, cows, etc. blowing across the road is always suboptimal. :yikes: The stench of a stray Walmart bag that melts onto your exhaust is also rather memorable.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
ahh, and today looks like its going to rain. I go from windy riding to rainy riding....Gotta get my miles up though
 
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