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I rock at logic
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I was following an old BMW home from work the other day, a nice bike in the middle of restoration. A couple of days later, a relative stopped by a family gathering with his "new" '72 Honda CB350. What a great bike... brought back a lot of memories.

All of this made me wonder if the V-Strom will become a classic in 30 years. It's a great bike, affordable, easily accessible, not unlike the CB350.

What do you think? Will people be restoring 'Stroms in 2037?
 

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There will always be somebody somewhere who will find one and restore it but if you are wanting to know whether keeping a Strom is an investment in the way a Brough Superior or an original Bonneville is then IMO the answer will be a firm no.
 

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It'll be a classic in a Bette Midler kind of a way!:mrgreen:
Now that's funny!

I don't think our bikes will even gain the collectiblity status of a Transalp (which I don't really understand why they are so popular). Either way, I'm enjoying it NOW.
 

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$tromtrooper
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I've thought about it, and I doubt it. Too much plastic and electronics. But who knows, in 30 years you might be able to ask a replicator to produce any part. Assuming of course, there is any gas left to run the thing and private property is still allowed.

I'm gonna take care of mine, ride it till it dies, then see what's available then.
 

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Not a classic in the since of a Norton or other type classic but definitely a bike that can be kept and ridden for 20 years and if they quit making it someone will say, "That bike is sweet. What is it?!"
 

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I was following an old BMW home from work the other day, a nice bike in the middle of restoration. A couple of days later, a relative stopped by a family gathering with his "new" '72 Honda CB350. What a great bike... brought back a lot of memories. <snip>
What do you think? Will people be restoring 'Stroms in 2037?
I think bike sales from the 1970's / early 80's were at a high that make a lot more people nostalgic then would be the case today. http://www.jama.org/statistics/motorcycle/sales/mc_sales_year.htm shows overall bike sales were ~3 million per year around 1980, compared to 700K in recent years. Bikes that stayed around virtually unchanged throughout that period (i.e. BMWs, Honda CB750/350, Yamaha XS650 / RD350) had a lot of people riding them. IMHO, I doubt the DL will become a classic - I think the people riding the DL now, are the people who started on classics?
 

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I rock at logic
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Discussion Starter #9
I think the people riding the DL now, are the people who started on classics?
That is the way I was thinking about it. The guy who bought the CB350 says he gets waves from just about every rider who is thirty years old or more, because a lot of them learned how to ride on a CB.
 

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probably not...

But I think its sibling the SV 650 will. There is a whole lot of aftermarket stuff and club racing for that bike. It is just too good for the money. You should see the SV forums and see what they do with em. Our little engine will have years of support.

Unfortunately with all our plastic bits, I don't think many will be around after 10 years. Yes, somebody could make a mold and do body work, but it probably isn't worth it. If someone were to start buying crashed bits and put them in a barn, maybe......
 

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I don't think so either.

Cars and bikes produced nowadays are for the consumer society: buy it, use it for a while, throw it and buy a new one, use it... etc.

They are even designed and engineered for very short lifetime compared to the ones from the past.
For an example I drove an Opel for 3 years. Factory guarantee was 2 years. The exhaust manifold built together with the catalytic converter went wrong 1 month after the warranty period ended. It was one of our company cars, so we had 15 of them. Almost all of them had the same issue.

Today, when everything is insured and the labor cost is so high it's easier to buy a new one instead of repair the old.

I hate it. :???:
 

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I hate the throw-away mentality too.
To me, it shows a total lack of pride or care in the design, and reflects all that is wrong with our society. Throw-away cars for throw-away people.
Just another reason you won't see me as CEO of a car company; I'd overdesign everything and run them out of business.
Really, I don't consider the Strom a throw-away bike. I understand that there are some things that will fail eventually, like the plastic bodywork. Electronics are replaceable. As the years go on, there will be people that come to understand how they work and find solutions for us collectors.
I guess I should also mention that I still have my first motorcycle- a 1973 CB350.
 

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I have an 06 dl650 and think it's a classic bike now.
My other bike is an 82 Honda CBX - transverse 6 cylinder for those who may be new to motorcycles. I consider the CBX a classic because of the engine and the looks. The 82 CBX has a lot of plastic, fairing, fairing lowers, side covers, and bags all stock and I think it will remain a classic even with the plastic.
The Vstrom is in its own way a classic now, it will do almost anything you want to do on a bike while having a blast, who can ask for more?
 

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It depends. If the Wee goes away, and nothing replaces it, it might be like the Transalp was. I knew a guy who got a premo price a few years ago selling one.
 
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