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How many motorcycle accidents have you had?

  • None

    Votes: 76 47.2%
  • One

    Votes: 37 23.0%
  • Two

    Votes: 17 10.6%
  • Three

    Votes: 11 6.8%
  • More than three

    Votes: 20 12.4%

  • Total voters
    161
  • Poll closed .
161 - 168 of 168 Posts

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I've had a couple mishaps. One was my fault, the other was almost completely beyond my control:
--highsided my little Honda CL360 when I forgot to pull the sidestand up (no physical damage to me or the bike)
--got rear-ended while paying a toll in Chicago many years ago. Old man from Wisconsin didn't just hit me-- he pushed me through the plaza and then kept on going, never did pay his toll! Troopers stopped him just up the road...
Funny thing, I was returning from a conference and mentioned to a couple local colleagues that I was on the bike.
They said "oh god, you didn't ride up {??? Boulevard}, did you? You'll get shot, stabbed, raped, robbed and set afire! You should hop on 294 and avoid that place!"
I expressed my reluctance to do toll plazas, especially since back then they had an actual gate that came down between fares. No escape route when there's a big barricade blocking the path. But they said, "you'll only hit one plaza, then you'll be scot free!" I was wary. Not wary enough, apparently. I had the exact toll change wedged on top of my tankbag, so I could make the exchange as quickly as possible. I rolled up, dropped the change in the attendant's hand, and then found myself staring at the ceiling of the toll plaza and at the arm lifting-- it just cleared my windscreen-- before I rolled off the left and managed to let the bike fall on me. So only the right side was shredded...

An interesting aside, in the category of Almost Another Crash: I was on a side street the other day, on my way to gas up, doing 25mph, when I saw a pickup approaching from a sidestreet. Thought to myself, "that guy goes through a lot of brakes" as he slammed to a stop at his stop sign. He looked right at me, I saw his wheels turn toward me and begin to roll forward. Big jerk was about to pull out left in front of me, so I laid on the horn and hit the brakes-- easy enough to get it hauled down from my geriatric pace. The horn made him stop short and he gave me the finger as I rode by. Jerk.
I didn't think another thing about it when I pulled into the gas station, popped the bike on the centerstand and started pumping. The big jerk came flying across the apron in his 4x4, missing my RH luggage by 6", and continued til he'd planted the front of his truck on top the curb outside the station. WTF? I thought. "F# you, @00hole!!!" he hollered, shaking his fist. Sigh. The thing is, he was going the OTHER way when he turned left, away from the gas station. He intentionally turned around and hunted me down to try and, I dunno, intimidate me? Kill me? Make me clean my shorts? Guys like that will one day miscalculate in their blind rage and eventually regret killing someone.
 

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A friend of mine recently wrote in an email "... we know that most riders will go down sooner or later". I disagree with him about that. But it got me to wondering which of us the numbers support. So a quick poll, if I can figure out how to do it. Let's take off-road riding out of the mix (though my one time down which was a transition from the road to a gravel parking lot would count).
All I can add is that I did not go down for many years. went down once when 14. Ridden pretty much all my life, and even commuted 2 hours a day.
Plenty of lane splitting, I've dodged drunk drivers and been able to dodge all sorts of situations. But just recently I crashed doing about 60mph ..... 56 years old.
I always rode knowing I could crash do I always geared up and wore an Air-bag vest.

Whatever you think always be prepared to crash. You may only get 1/3rd of a second warning...... like I did!

http://www.stromtrooper.com/riding-proficiency/344497-deer-crash-body-surfing-mulholland-highway-air-bag-vest.html
 

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If getting there safely is the goal
That is my goal. Hospital time is a real inconvenience. Trust me on that one.

How many times do you hear folks say dumb stuff like "I had to lay it down (to avoid an accident)"
I thought that was a thing of the past apart from rare instances. Like when you've found yourself in a position where a crash is unavoidable and the best escape route is to scrub off as much speed as possible and then slide 'er on under the trailer of the 18 wheeler that just pulled out of an alley in front of you. Laying a bike down is surrendering control, especially for braking. Tires work a lot better than foot pegs, exhaust pipes and handle bars for that purpose.

I added the part in parentheses as I've heard it before and thought it was hilarious. No dumbo, if you lay it down, you've had an accident.
 

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Guys like that will one day miscalculate in their blind rage and eventually regret killing someone.
Or when someone pops a cap in his a$$. Getting aggressive like that has a way of putting you in a bad position from time to time. I bet it isn't the first time he's come unhinged.
 

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I believe I would have never had a crash had I not been racing around. I enjoy riding hard and that's the chance you take, but I was riding above my limits on roads I never been on before and went down and I deserved it. This won't stop me from doing it again though as stupid as it may sound. I live for speed.
I would highly recommend you look into some track time. Much more controlled environment. You may seek out empty roads but they have potential risks you won't likely encounter on a track. And if you do crash, a track has a lack of furniture like guard rails, sign posts, and trees. You won't have too many trophy bucks run out in front of you either.

I've never done a track day - not many tracks out this way. My need for speed has diminished with age and the realization that I'm not invincible. I look back on my youth and feel lucky to have survived a few instances. I suppose I should be grateful that the bikes in my grasp were of much lower potential than the ones around currently. Maybe a decade or so ago, I was handed a 929* to ride in the country a bit east of Nashville, TN and was amazed at how fast I was going without realizing it until I glanced at the speedo between curves.

*At that time I was in possession of a couple of dirt bikes, the old BMW, the old CB750, and the Valk at the time.
 

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Pick and choose your battles carefully. Back roads are nice and often no heavily travelled. Interstates have some advantages if you can avoid rush hour. Everyone is going the same direction (at least I hope they are). So cars turning left in front of you aren't apt to happen. Lane selection and discipline are your friends. As are your eyes.

You're spot on to drive as if invisible and to not respond aggressively for the errors of others. As annoying as they are, they're not actually out to get you. Having an accident is a huge inconvenience for all parties involved, not just the dead motorcyclist. Cooler heads prevail.

Put a bunch of reflective tape on the back of the bike and add some form of running lights up front. A having several lights up front makes you more noticeable and less apt to look like part of a car well behind you. Another good habit is to weave when approaching areas where someone is apt to turn in front of you or pull out in front of you. Motion camouflage will hide you if you only go straight. The lateral motion of your lights in a weave gets attention. And cover them thar brakes when entering those danger zones or any area you think you may need the brakes. The time to get your hand over the front brake lever or foot over the rear brake may not seem great, but at speed you cover quite a bit of ground in that brief moment.

And if a collision is unavoidable, scrub off speed and aim for the lowest/softest target. Just before impact jump up to clear the cage. It is better to hit a car at the front where you can clear the hood than it is to hit in the passenger compartment where you have a higher object to clear. Handle bars can break legs so you want to clear them too. This is why I prefer foot pegs in a neutral position as opposed to forward controls on cruisers. Not a good topic to think about but one that you should give consideration too.

Apologies if you already know all these techniques but they cannot be stated enough. Part of defensive driving is being proactive. It ain't just keeping your eyes peeled.
THIS!

When I've toured, I've ALWAYS taken the Blue Highways. Even through cities...yes, hitting every stoplight in a strange town is a drag. Fighting for change out of your pocket at a Chicago toll booth while some Ali McBeal attorney-type in a BMW rear ends you because she's texting...that's worse than a drag.

In-town, slower-speeds give you time to react to idiots. In the country, there's fewer idiots and more to look at and feel. VERY rarely is the freeway the way to go - and if there's a lot of traffic, that's a bad ride, no matter where it is.
 

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I very much doubt you've seen more "life" than me and I don't have to dangle my balls out on every corner to prove it like some seem to need to.

You push the envelope all the time you are more likely to have a painful/costly come off than those of us who choose the time and place to push our skill sets. Your attitude is what causes insurance rates to climb.

Track rider I know won't push it in the public twists ...knows better about random factors.
Wanna push the edge??....the track is your place or the dirt .....not crowded public streets and highways.

Like being a pilot - a rider has to be confident....you don't have to push the VNe on every wing over...or every corner.

There is some luck involved in not coming off on pavement over a long period of riding .....there is also some skill you may lack if you have come off on pavement one or more times.
Generally summed up as good judgement.
I'm a insurance company's dream, I'm 55 years. I've always been insured and I've never made a claim, not on my homes, my cars, my bikes or my boats.

I have had 3 accidents on a sealed surface in my life, they were all when I was a teenager and I learnt from them.

The first was in a car, I only had my licence a few days and I spun-out in the wet, I learnt wet roads don't offer as much traction as dry ones.

The second was on a bike and I found out that old ladies don't always obey stop signs.

The third was also on a bike, I learnt that if you are sick stay in bed, passing out and coming to on a median strip was not part of the plan.

I was unhurt in every case and in every case I learnt something.

It's no good getting older without getting wiser.
 

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All I can add is that I did not go down for many years. went down once when 14. Ridden pretty much all my life, and even commuted 2 hours a day.
Plenty of lane splitting, I've dodged drunk drivers and been able to dodge all sorts of situations. But just recently I crashed doing about 60mph ..... 56 years old.
I always rode knowing I could crash do I always geared up and wore an Air-bag vest.

Whatever you think always be prepared to crash. You may only get 1/3rd of a second warning...... like I did!

http://www.stromtrooper.com/riding-proficiency/344497-deer-crash-body-surfing-mulholland-highway-air-bag-vest.html

Don't know how to say this without sounding like I'm personally criticizing you, I'm not, just wanted to throw this into the discussion.

Riding accident free has many components one being considering your route. If you can avoid a higher risk situation by not riding into it that reduces your risk.

Riding at night in a deer area is a poor decision as far as risk mitigation.

I'm sorry that you crashed but was your choice of riding in that area and time of day avoidable?
 
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