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At slower speeds, the bike seems a little bit like a wild stallion, dying to get out and go.

I have a 2007 DL1000 with 27K miles. Not sure if a tuneup, or any other work, has ever been done.

Any suggestions?

Have you seen a big difference in terms of slow speed smoothness, gear shifts between 1st and 2nd, with any work you have performed in the past?

Just trying to cruise at 25 mph is an effort.

TIA!!
 

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Needs the following:
- check the valve clearances (buy a manual and do it yourself (take your time))
- throttle body sync ( as explained in this forum)

I have a 2009 DL 1000, and it does not like slow speeds. I did a 2400 km trip with 4 Goldwings, on the back roads of NH,Maine and NY and I had to keep the revs between 3500 and 4000rpm while they cruised at slower rpms. Its the nature of the beast - we make our torque at higher revs. Makes for a rougher going at slow speeds.
 

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I added a power commander to mine. The factory fuel mapping was too lean for me. It lets me put around at 2500 rpm if I'm easy on the throttle. At 27K I would make sure the valves were adjusted, new spark plugs, new air filter. These bikes cruise best above 3500 rpm, I shoot for 4,000 to 4,500 on the interstate. You can also drop a tooth on the counter sprocket, but that does mess up the speedo. I run a 530 chain with 17/42 sunstar sprockets for a SV1000, along with a Gman TRE and it made the bike much more fun to ride. TB sync helps with idle smoothness, but do that after the valve adjustment. It will need an adjustment, have shims ready unless you are sure its been done recently. Check the fuel hose on the injector rail, those are prone to leaking. Also the vac test nipples on the throttle bodies crack and cause vacuum leaks, I put extensions on mine. That makes it easy to sync the TB's.
 

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Needs the following:
- check the valve clearances (buy a manual and do it yourself (take your time))
- throttle body sync ( as explained in this forum)

I have a 2009 DL 1000, and it does not like slow speeds. I did a 2400 km trip with 4 Goldwings, on the back roads of NH,Maine and NY and I had to keep the revs between 3500 and 4000rpm while they cruised at slower rpms. Its the nature of the beast - we make our torque at higher revs. Makes for a rougher going at slow speeds.
Pretty much this. Also, check for play in the cush rubbers on the rear wheel. Mine were the factory originals (I'm sure) and had tons of play. After putting in some new ones the bike seems quite a bit less snatchy and smoother. Fairly inexpensive and easy to check and replace, as long as you can remove the rear wheel on your own. If the sprocket carrier just falls off the wheel when the axle is removed, its time for new cush rubbers. :grin2:

I also upped my rear sprocket to 43 tooth. It makes lower speeds much more tolerable and a bit more usable torque, while not making interstate speeds too buzzy. I sometimes catch myself crusing at nearly 3000 rpm. That will require you to get a SpeedoDRD unless you want your speedo and odometer to be nearly 10% incorrect.

But otherwise its never going to be the kind of bike to take it easy at low speeds. That said, 25 should be fairly easy to maintain if you do everything we mentioned above. Maintaining 10 mph stuck behind a farm implement uphill, now that's when it gets restless. Your basically idling and slipping the clutch in 1st lol.
 

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A 530 sprocket/chain upgrade also smooths up the shifting. Mine shifts like butter since the chain alignment was improved with the 530 upgrade. A 15w40 dino oil seems to work good. Bike likes the 20w50 too, 10w40 is notchy in my 2006.
 

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From the factory, Vees are very lean at low RPMs. You need to get your ECU flashed to increase fuel at low RPMs or get a PCFC to adjust the same thing. (Power Commander Fuel Controller) Vees nearly all are way too lean in the 3500 RPM and below range. Your Suzuki dealer should be able to flash our ECU for you. What the other posters have said is also true, but lean mixture from the factory is the most common problem. It made my bike pleasurable to ride instead of always trying to keep the RPM up. Swallow the couple hundred bucks and get it done right. Having to ride at high RPM is a pain and it's all easily fixed.
 

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A 530 sprocket/chain upgrade also smooths up the shifting. Mine shifts like butter since the chain alignment was improved with the 530 upgrade. A 15w40 dino oil seems to work good. Bike likes the 20w50 too, 10w40 is notchy in my 2006.
Hmm... interesting. Will try 20W50 in the summer heat.
 

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I just bought my 2008 a month ago with 8000 miles on it.

I was experiencing the same problems from take off, first and second gear.

1.) I checked and set the throttle bodies, they were very close to being in sync.
2.) Put the service plug in factory diagnostic mode to check the primary throttle body sensor, it was align properly.
3.) Checked the fast idle STVA Secondary Throttle Valve Actuator voltage. It was ok.
4.) Replaced spark plugs. Old plugs looked good.
5.) Installed new air filter. Old filter could have been blasted with air.

There was no difference after all that work and checking.

SOOO ...

6.) Installed a PCIII with Exleper's Jett map.
7.) Installed a GIPro gear indicator with an ATRE. Advanced Timing Retard Eliminator.

After all the PCIII and GIPro... All I can say is WOW !!!


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