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I don't set out on a ride in the rain. That said I have been caught in the rain many times. On a 2700 mile trip last summer I spent at least 600 miles in the rain. Find rain gear that works for you and keep it on the bike if there is a chance of rain. Just remember to slow down and be vigilant as you are even less visible in the rain, or you can pull off the road and wait it out somewhere.
 

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Rain is fine but cautious around Tstorms....the wind can be vicious and for a new rider.....just get off and wait it out ...even if it's under an underpass. I do as well if it's bad enough.

People like Frog Toggs ....key to dry is doing up the seals properly especially at your neck.
 

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As you continue to ride, you'll find rain is unavoidable. Don't be afraid when it does just be aware that there are some additional hazards that arise. Shortly after the rain initially falls, any oil on the roadway will rise to the surface and run on top of the water but will lessen as the rain persists. Another issue is hydroplaning which is manageable as long as you're looking out for areas with water buildup.

I always ride slower and more cautiously with rain but once you get used to it, it's no big deal. I would also recommend gear to keep you dry, warm and visible.
 

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Mind the painted lines....nasty in the wet.
 

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Rain or shine I commute to work and back on my Strom. I am more cautious and leave much more room between me and the vehicles around me when it is raining.

Intersections are the most dangerous places for motorcycles (statistically) and weather is not a factor in 98% of motorcycle accidents. Be cautious but do not fear the rain.... After you have the skills and confidence to ride when the road is dry.

Stats are provided from the "Hurt Report"
http://isddc.dot.gov/OLPFiles/NHTSA/013695.pdf
 

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I ride all season long. Rain or shine. Get a good rain suit and waterproof gloves. Do as already suggested: slow down, watch for standing water to avoid hydroplaning, watch the road snakes, painted lines and drain/sewer covers (learned the hard way). I've ridden in rain for hours on a trip to Kansas and just this past weekend going to Port Dover, ON.

Hail hurts. Stop for that.
 

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If I didn't ride in the rain I probably would lost more than a quarter of my riding.


I don't have rain gear per se, but my Roadcrafter is Goretex and waterproof. I have an older Frogg Toggs top in my topcase but that's more in case I need an extra layer of warmth or for absolutely torrential downpours. I have my Aerostich over-gloves in the jacket part of my riding suit so I can out in while riding but my intmediate gloves are Goretex as well. My boots (Alpinestar Web Goretex are waterproof as well.

I basically couldn't care less about rain. I just ride and with the DL1000 having Traction Control and ABS I've learned there is a lot more traction than I ever woul have thought so don't really have to modify my riding technique much.

..Tom
 

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+1 on this -

I don't set out on a ride in the rain. That said I have been caught in the rain many times. On a 2700 mile trip last summer I spent at least 600 miles in the rain. Find rain gear that works for you and keep it on the bike if there is a chance of rain. Just remember to slow down and be vigilant as you are even less visible in the rain, or you can pull off the road and wait it out somewhere.
Also, back before texters took over the highways and byways I felt safer. Now if it rains I'll find a place to wait it out. Better to arrive someplace late than to never arrive anyplace again.
 

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Good advice above.

Be very cautious of the lack of conspicuity...harder for drivers to see you in heavy mist thrown up by tires on a wet road plus bad wipers on the car.

Dry gear keeps you warm. Getting wet and cold seriously harms your responses.

Wet tire traction can be very good, but still be cautious about traction. Thin tire tread, wet paint stripes or iron manhole covers, oil patches, mud on pavement, wet leaves are all hazards.

Always be ready to come home in the rain even if you don't go out in the rain.

Pledge furniture polish on a helmet face shield is one product that helped water bead up and blow off. Find a way to control fog inside the shield.
 

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Motorcycles rarely hydroplane, they cut right through the water unlike a flat car tire. Oh and yes I have ridden in a lot of rain, and some has been torrential.
 

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I no longer set out on rides in the rain unless it's unavoidable. I hate fogged visors and wet feet. Don't suggest a PinLock for my visor. I tried one but it didn't work. I've tried raw potato rubbed on, commercial anti-fog liquids, and dishwashing liquid. The latter seems to work best.

Fortunately, it doesn't often rain here (when I want to ride) so it's not an issue most of the time.
 

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I've always ridden in the rain. If the gear is holding up and there's not much in the way of deep puddles on the road I find it quite "zen" thanks to the need to be smooth in everything. Riding with wet gear through deep water on the road mid corner and in torrential downpours is not nearly so much fun, but if I'm going somewhere and it happens, then it happens. I'm not going to pussy out over a bit of water. Having good tyres makes all the difference though. Hard knobbie tyres are not your friend on wet bitumen.
 

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The furniture polish on the visor works a treat, generic cheapy stuff works just fine.Ride in the rain when you don't have to,so when you do have to it's not a frightening experience.
Bear in mind the first 20 minutes of rain is the slipperiest on the road as the surface gets washed clean,a good hard rain cleans that off nicely eventually.
Same as riding on loose surfaces,no sudden inputs,Braking,steering and acceleration all should be smooth and gentle but I try to ride like that most of the time anyway.
If it rains locally use it as experience,a nice warm shower at the end of your run will solve any comfort issues in general.
Bike is no longer my sole transport so I rarely ride in the rain nowadays unless I need to get home or am away on a trip,wet weather gear and some common sense and you'll {wait for it!}







be right as rain.
Wet or dry, smooth is fast in general.
 

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If it hasn't rained for a few weeks & I don't have to ride I generally wait a day to let any oil & crap buildup wash off the roads .
 

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While there are some good things written about wet road caution above, painted lines, steel grating or manhole covers are your first concern. When it just starts raining roads can be extra slick as the oil is washed out. But there is a LOT more wet road traction than many would have you to believe. Still, I slow down when not on Interstates and leave more room for braking.

Now to what really matters! Many fear riding in the rain. Don't want to feel like a wet noodle and come home dripping from every crevasse. I have ridden hundreds of miles in continuous rain and stayed perfectly dry. All about the gear you use.

Fogging! Number one concern for wet and very cold riding. I have never found ANYTHING that keeps a shield from fogging. Pinlocks help but are a handicap in themselves. I don't like to look through them. There are shields, with proprietary construction, that won't hardly fog even under the worst conditions. One is the Scorpion helmets. I bought one simply because of the shield! They will build up some condensation, but not fog. The best I have used was tested this past week coming back from the rally. New Bell Star. Could not get it to fog, even blowing breath on it. Rode in 40 degrees and the next day in rain for a good while. I have found that Frogg Toggs are good for a short time. Then they start to allow water through. Tourmaster brand rain gear isn't much more in cost and works rather well in my time with them. Aerostich Roadcrafter gear is some the best you can get and is about the only thing that is comfortable when in and out of rain all day. Those and my MotoPort gear with liners are the only thing that are simply WATERPROOF on a bike. Most boots you buy that are labeled waterproof are simply good for about an hour. Gore Tex lined is about all that works well. Same with gloves. I have grown to prefer the Aerostich Lobster overgloves. Just put them on over your regular gloves! I could go on, but overloaded this already. Just like camping, the only way to find what works for you is to ride with it and use it!
 
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