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I can’t say that I understand it either: 1. I’m sure that plenty of people walk right out the door without buying anything in that situation, and 2. You run the risk of putting a customer on a motorcycle that they won’t like, which can’t be good for business.

Yup. I did not have an issue getting a test ride on a Ducati Multistrada, but I was not able to get a test ride for DL1000 or a new Super Tenere.
So what did you buy?
 

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Only my personal experience: I've rented BMWs in Alaska, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Argentina twice. Everytime, either myself or someone I was riding with had, mechanical, computer, or electrical issues. Some of them annoying, some serious, and one was a show stopper.
I now have a 2018 DL650 and have done two rides on it south of the border. One 6300 miles, and the recent one 7,000 miles. Flawless. Love it. This bike's a keeper.
 

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600 miles between lubing is a bit too long IMHO, and I've never owned a bike where I needed to adjust my chain every 1000 miles, although it gets "somewhat adjusted" between rear tire changes. :) I agree that some fret and perhaps even make more of a big deal with maintaining chains/sprockets than they should, shafts are nice but they are a nightmare should they take a dump.
This is the main reason why I bought the S10. Shaft failures on the big Yamaha are urban myths, they just don't happen. IMHO the biggest reason for BMW having a history of shaft issues, is their styling department insisted on a 1 sided swing arm and 2 universal joints. Yamaha listened to the engineering department and built a much stronger 2 sided swing arm with only 1 universal joint. BMW's shaft design is more elegant, has a lot more moving parts, and is only marginally more refined in ride quality than Yamaha. Yamaha took the "keep it simple" approach. Dump some gear lube in that puppy every 10,000 to 15,000 miles and ride.

I chuckle a little at the fat Tenere comments. If you look at the beefy steel frame and over-built motor you will see where the weight is. It comes with a 6 gallon tank, that glorious shaft, and a factory center stand on it. I can honestly say that my DL was harder to pick up than my Tenere, since the V-twin carries the engine weight higher. The Tenere carries its weight low like a BMW.

If the Tenere had a chain, I would be riding a DL1000.
 

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The problem here (Australia) and it's the same for most Euro bikes is that the franchise holder won't keep spares in country and they all get ordered on demand. So minimum 2-3 weeks even if it was just a bearing. And that left some owners hanging for months on occasions, there are only so many parts you can borrow. That's the main reason I only ever owned one BMW.
I have never had 200 degree air blown on me from the fans on my 2003 Dl1000. In fact it's hard to evn know when the fans are on.

As far as BMW's go, I was seriously considering buying an older model GS or RT when I was on the market before buying the DL. But after doing some research, watching some videos on what it took to do some drivetrain maintenance I said no way. I haven't regretted my decision at all. Another thing I found I didn't like was the engine cadence at highway speeds on the BMWs, it always felt like they needed another gear or two.
What drive train maintenance are you refencing. The draining and refilling of 180cc of rear drive fluid. If you talking about the drive shaft and U-joint inspection yes its a bit more involved but not difficult. I can have the swing off drive shaft splines cleaned inspected and lubed and reassembled in about an hour. It doesn't need to be done frequently but when I get a new to me BMW I like to inspect for a baseline. This also gives me an oprrutinity clean and re-grease or replace the swingarm pivot bearings.

Here are the splines, drive shaft and U-joints at 43,000 miles, all in VG condition!



DS1.jpg



DS2.jpg



DS3.jpg



DS4.jpg
 

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I can honestly say that my DL was harder to pick up than my Tenere, since the V-twin carries the engine weight higher. The Tenere carries its weight low like a BMW.
Interesting you mention the feel of the weight.

A couple of years back, I was at the local dealer here and they had a Tenere next to a Vee 2. I went to sit on each one in turn, and I noticed the Vee took more effort to get it off the side stand than the Tenere. I didn't believe that so I tried it a couple more times and while close, the Tenere felt lighter in that regard.
 

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I loved my V-Strom: Celebrating 117,334 Miles. I couldn't have found a better bike to have most of my 20s and all of my 30s.

I went the other way: Chapter 3: Gelände Straße. I love to my V-Strom but I wanted to try the GS as it really was the bike that created the adventure bike category. Going from a 100,000 mile V-Strom to a brand-new GS was a definite transition. I loved all of the creature comforts, the fact that everything worked without question (just new bike vs old bike), and the level of polish on the bike.

What I quickly came to realize though was how simple the V-Strom was to work on. Everything inside of the GS is locked behind a computer and requires an additional level of complexity to deal with. The service manual for the V-Strom is easily available in a PDF online. I have yet to find a similar document for the GS. Everything is also more expensive. BMW is a lot like Harley-Davidson in the sense that there is a huge brand cult behind it. The V-Strom was "just another Japanese motorcycle".

I like my GS, but the V-Strom will always have a place in my motorcycling history heart. That yellow will always be drop dead gorgeous in my mind.

Dan
 

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Hah! I replaced my 2003 DL1000 (that I had 14 years and about 95K miles on) with a Tiger 1200 Explorer.

At age 72.

I loved the DL, but was suckered in by shaft drive, cruise control and a 955 watt alternator. But yeah - it IS a top heavy beast.

I just added my first GS to the stable - a G310GS. It's actually taller than the Tiger :eek:, but a LOT easier to pick up when it takes a nap.
My main issue with the Triumph was when riding Two up plus luggage. Several times when at very low speed or coming to a halt in that mode I came close to dropping it. Being of light sture and only 5'8" didn't help. However I really loved that bike and for such a big lump it was very nimble when riding solo on backroads and the like. I will always have a soft spot for that gorgeous three cylinder motor.
 

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Just a fun addition which is a pertinant, but far from necessary, addition to the conversation.
See point #2 @ 2:58 for my point.

 

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As a returning rider , I am looking at my options. Most of my 55 years of riding took place on BMW's... specifically the GS. I have owned Hondas, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Indian Springfield, HD for like a week...lol. Sadly, the BMW dealer ship near me ( 55 miles) is now gone. The nearest is 200 miles. I have been looking at all scenario's , like service and reliability etc. I do not see doing any more Iron Butt rides or 3 week trips. That all said, I am seriously considering a new old stock 2015 DL1000. It seems BMW has developed a really bad reputation for quality and even worse when it comes to getting a warrantee issue resolved.

What I do not know is, what was your experiences with dealer ships? How much trouble is using/ riding a bike with a chain. I know back in the 70's it sucked!

FWIW, I have been reading on here for days ( nothing else to do). Seems there are as many ways to maintain a chain as bike owners. Very CONFUSING !

What would be a good price? It is a standard model !


Thanks for your well thought out response!
Cheers,
David
I backed out of a deal to buy a mid mileage 1200gs. I just couldn’t get past the recent unreliability and cost of repair if you actually have a dealer in the area.
Very happy with a newer, less miles V2
 

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full disclosure, i got two pages in and stopped reading, so apologies if this has been settled. I bought a NOS 2016 DL in June 18 for $8000 i think, somewhere around there. I thought that was a good deal at the time.
 

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As a returning rider , I am looking at my options. Most of my 55 years of riding took place on BMW's... specifically the GS. I have owned Hondas, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Indian Springfield, HD for like a week...lol. Sadly, the BMW dealer ship near me ( 55 miles) is now gone. The nearest is 200 miles. I have been looking at all scenario's , like service and reliability etc. I do not see doing any more Iron Butt rides or 3 week trips. That all said, I am seriously considering a new old stock 2015 DL1000. It seems BMW has developed a really bad reputation for quality and even worse when it comes to getting a warrantee issue resolved.

What I do not know is, what was your experiences with dealer ships? How much trouble is using/ riding a bike with a chain. I know back in the 70's it sucked!

FWIW, I have been reading on here for days ( nothing else to do). Seems there are as many ways to maintain a chain as bike owners. Very CONFUSING !

What would be a good price? It is a standard model !


Thanks for your well thought out response!
Cheers,
David
Have owned several BMW over the years. Now on my second vstrom 1000 a 2019. Best bikes I have ever owned.
 

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And I guess a lot of this comes down to what you want to a bike. BMW, Ducati,KTM design bikes that satisfy the box tick shopper. People who want all the boxes ticked on their shopping list. Prices are higher because of the tech, but also because of the higher marketing costs, greater dealer overheads (which is why you can often get a test ride on a BMW but not a Suzuki or Honda) AND the higher cost of warrantee claims.

The Japanese manufacturers run on tighter margins and in particular do not want warrantee costs after they've sold the bike. They just want to sell the bike, they aren't in to selling the experience as well. (Which is IMHO a good thing, because owning a Euro bike isn't always a pleasant experience). And since I just want a bike I can ride and want to have fun from the riding rather than just from owning the expensive bling the Japanese approach works for me.

I do have friends for whom it's the opposite, they want the experience and won't look at anything but Euro bikes. (They probably pay young ladies wearing not much black leather to whip them for their jollies as well, but that's another story).
 

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PeteW,

I don't think any manufacturer wants warrantee claims.

MIdWinter,

The Stelvio's are nice bikes. If they made a 2V 1100 version I would have had one years ago. I'm not a fan of anything Guzzi and 4 valves per cylinder. Wished MG would have continued developing CARC bikes instead of dropping them from the lineup. But it seems that MG is more content to slap a new paint scheme on the same old V7 and add another Roman numeral to the series.

Moto Guzzi will officially jump the shark when they inevitably come out with a Small Block o look like a LeMans I and a small block with the 1000S paint scheme. Really surprised they haven't done this already.
 

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I would like to know towards what bike you are leaning at the moment. Also, on what BMW forum have you posted the same question? Might be hilarious to read that thread too.
 

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And I guess a lot of this comes down to what you want to a bike. BMW, Ducati,KTM design bikes that satisfy the box tick shopper. People who want all the boxes ticked on their shopping list. Prices are higher because of the tech, but also because of the higher marketing costs, greater dealer overheads (which is why you can often get a test ride on a BMW but not a Suzuki or Honda) AND the higher cost of warrantee claims.
...

Well to be fair Euro bikes typically are built with higher quality components. Everything from the fasteners used to the minor and major components.

Doesn't make a GS twice as nice as a Strom (in my mind) if you're comparing them on cost of course. Diminishing returns and all that!
 

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For me quality in engineering comes down to "How often does it break" rather than "How pretty does it look". The Japanese are better at the first, the Europeans better at the second.

Personally I like riding more than I like looking at the bike (or not riding because it's in the shop).
 
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