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Which way to turn off the bike - opinions?

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When stopping and getting off your bike, which of these do you most commonly do to cut off your engine:

1). Use engine kill switch on right handlebar.

or

2). Turn ignition key to off position.

or

3). Pull side kickstand down.

I've always performed all three steps in this exact order. However, my friend told me to NOT use the engine kill switch to turn the bike on/off. He said to always leave it on. He said to simply do step 2 or step 3 only. He reasons step 3 is effective if the engine is still running and in gear. I realize all three will ultimately cut the engine off, but which one is more favored over the others?
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I always use the key, with the bike in first gear so it can't roll off the sidestand.
By using the key, I avoid the senario described in another thread here, coming back to a dead battery. I've never used the kill switch, just never been in the habit of it... I suppose, if my cars and truck had little red kill switches on the dash, I'd be more accustomed to using yet another way to turn it off, and then turn it off again.
 

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"You're never going to get agreement on this. "

You're right there, my wife was taught in Team Oregon training to always use the kill switch, I never do, we've had to agree to disagree, and our marriage has so far survived... LOL
 

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I use the key 'cause that's the way my car works and I'm conditioned to this method over several thousands of repetitions. The other reason is that the throttle lock switch arm covers the kill switch.
 

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You ever ride for a bit then go to park and put down your kickstand and the engine shuts off...you, not expecting that and realizing you had a duh moment...then try to make it seem like you meant to do that all the time.

Me neither.

Anywhoo, maybe everyone could state their preceptions (wrong or right) of the pros/cons of each way. Then shoot down...I mean...discuss those precieved pros and cons for all three techniques.

Kill Switch Pro:
Every bike has one in the same spot so when you get on bubbas bike you know how to stop it in a hurry.
Kill Switch Con:
Will leave your headlights on if your key is still on. Everybody looks at you funny when you try to start your bike and forgot to turn the kill switch back on.

Ignition Switch Pro:
Turns off everything
Ignition Switch Con:
None.

Kick Stand Pro:
Easy to park on a hill.
Kick Stand Con:
Hard to start on a hill. :biggrinjester:
 

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Kill Switch Con:
Will leave your headlights on if your key is still on. Everybody looks at you funny when you try to start your bike and forgot to turn the kill switch back on.
I have also heard about using the kill switch unnecessarily wearing the contacts out prematurely


Ignition Switch Pro:
Turns off everything
Ignition Switch Con:
None.
that about sez it all

Kick Stand Pro:
Easy to park on a hill.
Kick Stand Con:
Hard to start on a hill. :biggrinjester:
what does being on a hill have to do with turning the bike on and off:confused:



 

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Kill Switch Pro:
Hands can have levers covered while thumbing off and allows both feet on ground.
Every bike has one in the same spot so when you get on bubbas bike you know how to stop it in a hurry.
Kill Switch Con:
Will leave your headlights on if your key is still on. Everybody looks at you funny when you try to start your bike and forgot to turn the kill switch back on.

Ignition Switch Pro:
Turns off everything
Ignition Switch Con:
Right handers can't use front brake; if brake needed must cover with right foot while balancing on one leg.
Left handers can't keep clutch pulled.


Kick Stand Pro:
You know stand is down.
Easy to park on a hill.
Kick Stand Con:
Hard to start on a hill.

I use kill switch.
 

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Iwhat does being on a hill have to do with turning the bike on and off:confused:
I was thinking when you stop the bike, still in 1st gear, put down the kickstand to turn the bike off and now you don't have to worry about rolling backwards.

When starting the bike you have to raise the kickstand and keep the bike from rolling backwards while you start it. (Suppose you could always put it into neutral)
 

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I do the side stand thing.. Here is my routine:
1) Drop the kick stand down while in first gear, let the engine die
2) Let out the clutch and if on a hill/slope, let the bike roll till the engine stops it. If on level ground, roll the bike forward till the engine stops it.
3) Settle bike on side stand and turn off ignition.

There are various ways that everyone shuts off their bike, it comes down to what ever makes you happy.
 

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I was thinking when you stop the bike, still in 1st gear, put down the kickstand to turn the bike off and now you don't have to worry about rolling backwards.

When starting the bike you have to raise the kickstand and keep the bike from rolling backwards while you start it. (Suppose you could always put it into neutral)
Perhaps, but it is easy enough to put it in neutral to start it - I do this every time.
 

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Sometimes I use the kill switch, sometimes I use the side stand. I prefer to shut the engine down with both hands on the handlebars. In the last 11 years of riding electric start only bikes with lights always on, I have never left the key on and flattened the battery.

I always take the keys with me when leaving the bike.
 

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I have also heard about using the kill switch unnecessarily wearing the contacts out prematurely
Don't believe everything you hear (or read on the internet). By definition using the kill switch can't wear it out prematurely (even if it using it results in its failure), since it is designed to be used.

As an electrical engineer, I can assure you that the duty on a kill switch, sidestand switch or key cluster is the same, and that its easier (and probably cheaper) to replace the kill switch or sidestand switch than the key switch.

Having said that each to their own and stop the engine which ever way suits you.
 

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Don't believe everything you hear (or read on the internet). By definition using the kill switch can't wear it out prematurely (even if it using it results in its failure), since it is designed to be used.
I have to say I believe what I heard even if it is parole evidence, it simply came from a trusted mechanic that's replaced 10times over more kill switches than he has ignition switches, and invaribly, kill switch failures occured on bikes that the kill switch was routinely used to turn the bike off

the problem with kill switch failures isn't that it will fail to kill the engine, the problem is that you can't start the bike up after a failure

my opinion is that kill switches are not built to the same duty cycle as ignition switches,



 

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Use all three once in a while to be sure they're working.

I usually use the sidestand, 'cuz I have the bike in 1st, clutch in, front brake on, right foot on the ground. The sidestand down, engine off, transmission in 1st, clutch out, and the bike is ready to park. Key goes off next. Cut off switch would only be used, except for testing, if I'm in a tight spot and want the engine off right now.
 

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I'll second that opinion.
3rd here. While I don't have any proof that there is any excessive wear on the switch its self, I find it to be an unnecessary step when the side stand switch will do the same anyway. The side stand switch gets used every time you put the stand down anyway.

I just like to have both my hands on the handle bars, one on the front brake and the other holding in the clutch while safely shutting off the engine.

I'm surprised no one replied that they like to stop the bike, put it in neutral and just let it fall over and kill the engine that way. This solves two problems:

1) The engine will shut off anyway, just turn off the ignition and walk away
2) Because its already on its side, you don't have to worry about it falling over.

A bonus might be that if someone wanted to steal your bike.. might be too lazy to pick it up.

A negative to say the least is that when you are ready to leave, you got to pick it up.
 
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