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Discussion Starter #1
I just got an '04 Wee with 16k on it, and no maintenance records. I plan on renewing all the fluids. The present coolant looks good and is dyed blue. I haven't tested it*.

Which antifreeze is the current favorite?

I don't want to use Dex-Cool or any of the all-make/all-model antifreezes which are mainly the same chemistry as Dex-Cool. The ingredients in Dex-Cool act as a plasticizer and soften certain gaskets (the older GM intake manifold gaskets are exhibit "A").

I could use ordinary green antifreeze, but I'd like a long-life variety. The manual says to use an antifreeze that is aluminum friendly, and all are these days.

Suggestions?


*To test the corrosion inhibitors in coolant, put a probe from a digital voltmeter in the cool coolant in the radiator neck (not touching metal) and the other probe on the battery negative post. If you read 0.1 to 0.3 volts DC, the corrosion inhibitors are good. If you get 0.5 VDC or more, the inhibitors have been depleted. You're seeing the voltage generated by the dissimilar metals acting as a galvanic cell. Getting access for a test like this on a motorcycle can be a challenge...probably easier to just drain & renew the coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
There are several different chemistries of corrosion inhibitors, all in ethylene glycol base. Different chemistries react differently with the combination of various metals and the materials in the gaskets in different engines.

GM's infamous Dex-Cool is organic acid technology (OAT)...the organic acid used is 2-EHA which can soften certain gaskets. Ford, Chrysler, and Mercedes use hybrid organic acid technology (H-OAT) called G-05. Some Japanese engines require a phoshated organic acid (P-OAT) coolant, which is hard to find as an aftermarket product. Zerex makes an "Asian" engine aftermarket coolant, but nobody stocks it. The different engine makers require different (or zero levels) of phosphates, or nitrites, or silicates. The all-makes/all-models antifreeze may be an OAT that does not use 2-EHA, but anyone planning on keeping a vehicle for many years is smart to use the chemistry the manufacturer recommends (except GM & Dex-Cool).

I'll probably end up using some Toyota red antifreeze (cheap and available at any Toyota dealer) mixed with distilled water in my V-Strom.
 

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IMHO
It is just as easy to use the Honda or Suzuki OEM. Very small amount and only once a year change out. Just my .02.
Mike :D
 

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Whatever product you use, make sure you mix it with DISTILLED water - don't use tap water - the minerals will eventually kill the cooling system
 
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Any Autozone, Advance Auto, Napa, etc...recycles for free...in Ohio at least.

BTD.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Some localities have tap water that is pure enough so it does not cause a problem in cooling systems. Other localities have minerals in their tap water that will cause problems. 79¢ for a gallon of demineralized or distilled water is cheap insurance.

Check with local waste disposal folks. If theer is no public recycling, they might say that it is OK to dump it in the municipal waste water system (your toilet or sink drain). Or, ask a shop where you get auto or motorcycle work if they'll take it.
 

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