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Farkle Purchasing System
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I thought hard about having a shop do my valve clearance check. I can afford it and it certainly would be easier in some ways. I had a shop do my last one a few years ago.

But I don't trust them. They broke stuff when I had some other work done last year. I'm not paying their rates if they're going to be sloppy and break things, so that I have to go behind them and check for new damage. At least if I do it I know what was done and whether it was done right.
 

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2007 DL650
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24 Posts
I did the valve clearance check last night for the first time in my own. It isn't that hard, if everything is in spec. It doesn't look that much harder to replace shims after it is all apart but It was all good.

About 4 hours for me from starting disassembly to test run but I was in no hurry. Maybe another hour to replace shims if you have them on hand.

I bought my used Wee in October and have gone through it pretty thoroughly. I found lots of little stuff to get back into shape.

Read the stuff online but also download the shop manual.
 

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17,759 Posts
If that's the case, so be it. But I prefer a dedicated, fuse-protected ignition circuit for high-draw accessories. I doubt anyone from Oxford will come give me a jump start if I forget to shut the grips off ;). I've read that they allegedly auto-off somewhere around 11.5 volts, but I'm not too comfortable with that.
Get the PC-8 from Eastern beaver.....plug and play and you'll thank me for it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I realized that I mentioned that the cam timing was off, but never posted a picture. This is the front cylinder. As you can see, the intake cam was not aligned properly. Waiting for shims now. Then, I can get the engine reassembled and continue on with the rest of the hit list... I mean wish list.

281369
 

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Obviously, change all the fluids. I remove, clean, and grease all lever pivots. Grease the rear suspension linkage. Loosen and re-torque all fasteners on the front suspension, assuring the axle is properly located. Re-torque the rear axle as well, verify rear-wheel alignment. Loosen and re-torque engine mount bolts. Check that all fairing mount fasteners are in place and tight. Change air and oil filters unless you have verified service records. Check brake pads and rotor thickness. Obviously, check for wiring mods. If spoke wheels, check and adjust tightness of spokes.

Ideally, you never buy a used bike from a suspect owner, but sometimes limited choices force a compromise. Good way to get to know yor new bike, make sure fasteners can be removed if repairs are necessary, assure that the bike is safe to ride. Never know what a prior owner might or might not have done. Particularly on an older bike, fasteners may be stuck, requiring some time and patience, or possibly replacement. Good way to check for corrosion as well.
 

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The dread "PO" strikes again.

On my Vee, there was a giant hole for a cigarette lighter outlet punched into the fariing cover, powered by a pair of unfused wires back to the battery just sort of casually draped through the "V" of the engine, with the throttle linkage sawing away gently... no idea how it never made it all the way through the insulation, but that could have been exciting.

I've found lots of fun stuff from POs on every bike I've owned. I partially blame some of the accessory manufacturers, who helpfully include evil Scotchlok wire taps to make installation easy-peasy.

POs just love to monkey with wires, for some reason.

My vintage 1983 Suzuki GS850G came to me with several 5/16" and 1/4" fasteners from some grandpa's coffee can siezed firmly into 8mm and 6mm holes, complete with remnants of Briggs & Stratton paint. That was always fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Yes, one (or more) of the POs was sure "creative". I forgot to mention that my bike came with a bunch of color-changing lights strategically placed around the bike, with the wiring between them draped all over everything. No idea how none of the wires were melted or worn through. Took that spaghetti garbage out within an hour of getting the bike home from buying it. I'd been trying to do a deep overhaul before now, but life gets in the way. Started with the external bits; now going in deep.
 

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Get the PC-8 from Eastern beaver.....plug and play and you'll thank me for it. :)
Also the FZ-1 Fuzeblock is the tits for auxilliary wiring. I like them better as they have a 30a relay and if you connect the trigger wire you can have keyed or power all the time simply moving the fuse in the block.

It does haver 2 less circuit capacity over the PC-8 but I've never needed more than 4 and mostly two.
 

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2006 DL1000
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442 Posts
Not my machine, but I went to college with a guy who bought an old beat-up car to drive to school and back, and the previous owner had hard-wired a voltage transformer into the car and hung a 120 volt fluorescent light under the dash on the passenger side. 🤦‍♂️🤪
 

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Not my machine, but I went to college with a guy who bought an old beat-up car to drive to school and back, and the previous owner had hard-wired a voltage transformer into the car and hung a 120 volt fluorescent light under the dash on the passenger side. 🤦‍♂️🤪
No accounting for good taste. Hey, at least it wasn't a clown barf color changer. (that's a knitting term for that over the top varigated pink/purple/yellow yarn.)
 

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2003 Suzuki V-Strom DL1000
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371 Posts
So I bought my 2002 at the end of the fall in 2019, and I only got a few rides in before the winter set in. I had to address a couple things right away. It had a bad pop/backfire upon deceleration, which I found to be the seal on the rear cylinder exhaust pipe. I redid the exhaust and changed the mufflers, then rode it until the salt hit the streets.

Over that winter, I replaced the tires, the chain and sprockets, did the rear wheel spacer mod, did the Werks clutch basket, replaced the broken turn signals, and a bunch of other minor stuff.

Rode through this past summer and it was good for the most part. A few running stumbles and it's always felt rough. Been playing with the TFI adjustments to hone in on it. I added a voltmeter and an Admore lighting kit to the topcase over the summer, and decided to tear it down for real and go through it. Removed the necessary fairing pieces and the radiator so I can check/adjust the valves. Checked and torqued the slack adjusters. I have already cleaned up some of the wiring under the seat, but I got a good laugh this afternoon that had me shaking my head. One of the previous owners added a compact air horn. I knew where it was, and there was a relay strapped to the side of it, so I figured it was done fairly well. I was mistaken. Whoever added it unplugged the factory horn and used that for power and ground. No other power source, though. They literally powered the latching coil of the relay and the load circuit of the relay with the factory horn connector and circuit. So, in effect, they actually added even more load than they would have if they had just run the factory wires right to the air horn motor with the minor amount of load from the relay. Well done :rolleyes:. How it actually worked, I don't know. I also found that the grip heater controller was wired directly to the battery. I just about gutted all of the added accessory wiring this afternoon so I can redo it correctly. I figure that the Strom isn't worth much, cash wise, these days. May as well get it as correct and reliable as possible and ride it all over the place. Even when it isn't exactly right, it's still a hoot to ride.
My 2003 DL1000 came with an aftermarket power source box under the seat. The heated grips where connected to one of the always on circuits and would drain the battery unless I manually turned off the grips from the grip control. I rewired the grip power to one of the switched circuits in the box and all is good.

You might want to invest in one of these powerpoint boxes.
 

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2003 Suzuki V-Strom DL1000
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371 Posts
I already have the previous version of the Eastern Beaver fuse box. That's where I plan to power up the grips. But still; Thank You for thinking of me Big B!
Be sure to connect them to one of the switched circuits.
 
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