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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, here's another question that I'm sure will generate debate, so I'll go with the most consistent answers. :wink:
For my first oil change (500-600 miles) on the '04, should I just use a conventional oil or can I use semi-synthetic? My plan is to always use a semi-synthetic every 2,500-3,000 miles.....just want to know if I should use it now or wait until I reach 3,000.

thanks, guys :)
-David
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Nonsense. :D
Slap that synthetic in there. It won't have any effects on "clutch break-in".
You're talking about bike-specific stuff, right? :twisted:
 
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Discussion Starter #5
definitely wait until 2500-3000 miles.it's all the other stuff in there that needs to break in as well.one thing to keep in mind about full synthetic is that some of it will burn,specifically those designed for superbike racing engines that allow engine builders to use tighter tolerances and super-thin oil developed for that purpose.they don't need to worry about oil burning over a 100-mile event but it does burn.motul 300v is one of those,excellent oil,but keep your eye on that window over long term mileage between changes.also,where are you riding?back country highways away from cycle shops when you need a little oil(little leak you fix on the road)you can't use the stuff from the shed behind the fruit stand to mix with your synthetic but it will mix with a blend to get you home.cletus doesn't use redline race oil in his tractor. :idea:
 
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Discussion Starter #6
ahhh...I love a good oil thread. Nothing like it to liven up a board and ferret out the religious preferences of the locals. :lol: :lol:
 
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Discussion Starter #7
definitely wait until 2500-3000 miles.it's all the other stuff in there that needs to break in as well
That must be why some of the most expensive cars in the world come from the factory with Mobil 1. :wink: I talked to a guy that builds and races motorcycle drag bikes and engines. He puts syn oil in all his bikes from the get go. He said modern engines break in very quickly, synthetic doesn't inhibit the process at all. I am NO EXPERT, just going on other peoples experience and opinions. I never really used to be a big synthetic believer until recently, now it is all I plan on using. Engine noises became minimal and the shifting is awesome!!
 

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Yep - I am switching to Amsoil Motorcycle 10W40 in a few more miles here - at 600 exactly. Switch then and never look back.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Kidder is spot on. Between 3K and 5K miles. A motorcycle engine needs mineral-based oil to burnish, i. e., seal the pores of the metallic parts of the engine, including the clutch. Synthetic oils, due to the properties that make them superior lubricators, don't perform this process well at all.

The burnishing process seals all the microscopic pores in your engine's metal parts, creating a naturally slick surface that's far more resistant to wear and has been shown to significantly extend engine life. Once that's occurred, then switching to synthetic will give you all the advantages synthic oils are known for.

Superbike racing teams have been following this same methodology for years with their track bikes. It's sort of like seasoning a cast iron skillet. No joke!
 

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There are several new vehicles that come from the factory with synthetic oil - corvette, cadillac, some fords just to name a few. Those engines outlast their dyno - delivered predecessors with no qualms about using synthetic from the get go.

Use whatever you want at the first 600 mile service and don't worry about a thing.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Huh??? Last time I checked Corvette and Caddy engines never got near a 9500 rpm redline and the stresses on a two-cylinder vs. eight cylinder engines are like comparing grapes to coconuts. They also don't have wet clutches which also benefit from the burnishing step I mentioned. Gee whiz! :)

Automobile engines (and some motorcycle engines) that arrive from the factory with synthetic oil in their crankcases have critical components finished with either ceramic composites or other plating technologies, which create a surface that doesn't require the burnishing step I mentioned. :lol:

Hope that clarifies...
 
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Discussion Starter #14
The debate goes on...... :D I would like to think that BMW, Aston Martin and Jaguar "just to name a few" wouldn't send their cars out the door of the factory, with anything but the best in them. Mechanic told me that todays high performance motorcycle engines don't really need a break in period and also usually have minimal if any issues. All three of my first oil changes had nothing on the magnetic plug and the oil still looked really good and clean. Also, unless I am wrong, aren't the cylinders coated on the Stroms and several other Suzuki models? I can't see any negative issues with going to synthetic ASAP!! :) My bike couldn't run any better than it does right now..... 8)
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Suzuki uses electrochemical plating on the cylinders, a very good thing, but other engine parts that benefit from the break-in are still made of conventional materials. :)
 

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Grapes, coconuts, ceramics, pottery, and SCEM, I still say "run whatever the heck you want at the 600 mile service as long as it's JASO MA" and live happily ever after. If Suzuki didn't want you to run synthetic at the 600 mile service, they would tell you, no?
 
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Discussion Starter #18
If Suzuki didn't want you to run synthetic at the 600 mile service, they would tell you, no?
Couldn't agree more!! :lol:
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Every Suzuki factory mechanic I know says to avoid synthetic until at least 3000 miles in the V-Strom, but that's only six of 'em and in Seattle. Maybe it's different up here... :)
 

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Woofy said:
Every Suzuki factory mechanic I know says to avoid synthetic until at least 3000 miles in the V-Strom, but that's only six of 'em and in Seattle. Maybe it's different up here... :)
I've been told the same - by Suz and non-Suz dealers alike.

I'm just gonna wait until the 3k miles/5k kms - more incentive to get the bike on the road before snow fall (wretched canadian weather).
 
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