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Discussion Starter #1
I'm about to perform several maintenance tasks at 56k miles and have been doing a ton of research on procuring the parts and checking for having the proper tools on hand. Here's my issue; while researching the wheel bearing replacement tools, I see that tool 09921-20240(bearing remover tool) is $640 at the lowest price I can find. DAMMIT STANLEY! I'm not going to pay such a price for a rarely used tool. From old posts here, it looks like I can remove the bearings with a drift(hopefully). I was wondering exactly how this tool works as it appears to be jaw-type puller from the pics that pull from slots machined inside the spacer which would use the spacer to pull the bearing out. Is this correct?
 

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Look up bearing removal tool on chaparral for bearing removal tool. You end up spending less, you simply have to find the right diameter tool to use with a screwdriver. (Motion Pro Wheel Bearing Remover - Chaparral Motorsports)

I did all my wheel bearings today using a hammer n long screw driver and a heat torch. I must say the hardest part was pulling the first bearing from each wheel... You get the feeling of spanking you young one; "BANG!!! Sorry but this is for your own good...BANG!!!.
All went well, bike runs well.
 

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If you have aftermarket manuals for any of your motorcycles, they'll show how to remove the bearings with a drift.

There's a slide hammer tool that works pretty well:
Posse BLIND BEARING AND BUSHING REMOVER

Harbor Freight has the exact same set for far less money.
Blind Hole Bearing Puller - Needle Bearing Puller

I have one of these sets, but sometimes you still have to use a drift if the bearings are really stuck in there. The advantage of the blind puller is that it can't do any damage -- with a drift, you can beat up the inside of the spacer a bit.


This is basically a set of inserts with a long wedge:
Posse WHEEL BEARING REMOVER SET
Haven't used this, but the principle looks good and I've heard good things.
 

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You shouldn't have any problem just using a sacrificial flathead screwdriver and hammer to knock the old bearings out. The second one is easy. The first one, if it's really stuck, benefits from some heat.

Just did my front bearings the other day. Out with the old and in with the new and on the road in half an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies. I have the MP expanding collet style bearing remover which "should" do the job. However, I was wondering out the Suzuki tool works as I was looking at the pics in my service manual and it looks like it is designed to grab a slot on the inner spacer which would pull it out while pushing out the bearing ahead of it. I won't know until I remove the bearings and inspect the spacer to see how it grabs. Unless the tool grabs the bearing itself but I don't see how there would be enough of a gap between the spacer and bearing. I like to know these things....and will.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Oh...one last question or advice, would it be prudent to put a thin coat of anti-seize on the outer bearing races when I press them in so that they will come out easier in the future? I can't see a reason why not as once the bearings and spacer are installed, the outer collar prevent the bearings from moving. Seems like a win/win to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you have aftermarket manuals for any of your motorcycles, they'll show how to remove the bearings with a drift.

There's a slide hammer tool that works pretty well:
Posse BLIND BEARING AND BUSHING REMOVER

Harbor Freight has the exact same set for far less money.
Blind Hole Bearing Puller - Needle Bearing Puller

I have one of these sets, but sometimes you still have to use a drift if the bearings are really stuck in there. The advantage of the blind puller is that it can't do any damage -- with a drift, you can beat up the inside of the spacer a bit.


This is basically a set of inserts with a long wedge:
Posse WHEEL BEARING REMOVER SET
Haven't used this, but the principle looks good and I've heard good things.

The MP tool is nearly identical to the Pitposse tool you linked to. Since my Wee is an '06 and probably hasn't had the bearings replaced, I'll probably need to heat the hub, but what heat source to use that doesn't ruin the wheel paint/coating? I assume a dual range heat gun?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Look up bearing removal tool on chaparral for bearing removal tool. You end up spending less, you simply have to find the right diameter tool to use with a screwdriver. (Motion Pro Wheel Bearing Remover - Chaparral Motorsports)

I did all my wheel bearings today using a hammer n long screw driver and a heat torch. I must say the hardest part was pulling the first bearing from each wheel... You get the feeling of spanking you young one; "BANG!!! Sorry but this is for your own good...BANG!!!.
All went well, bike runs well.

Heat torch? What type? Butane? Propane? Electric heat gun? Does your wheel show any visual damage from the torch?
 

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I have a blind puller myself. Works OK. But last time I had wheels off to let the local shop R&R my tires I found a bad bearing. The shop did my tire mount and bearing replacements on a rear wheel for $45. Basically $25 to mount and balance and $20 to do the bearings. I brought the bearings in with the wheel.

Yes, I know...its cheating but I save my knuckles and profanity for more complicated repairs I do not trust the shop with. If you do your own bearings watch out for wheel damage and above all, drive the new ones in straight or use an arbor press applying any and all force to the outer bearing race.
 

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Maybe for the second bearing. The first one typically requires a removal tool. How are you using a dowel on the first bearing removed?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Maybe for the second bearing. The first one typically requires a removal tool. How are you using a dowel on the first bearing removed?

Perhaps he is referring to installation....and not removal?
 

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Another 06 Wee owner here and I just changed mine today. Not sure if it's proper to dig up a month old thread but removal isn't all that difficult and shouldn't really require any special tools. I used the short curved end of an allen wrench to push the spacer over a bit and then a long 1/2" drive socket extension as my drift. Didn't take much effort once I got the thing started. The bearings came out without any heat or extra exertion. The other side came out even easier. Only extra step I took was to remove the discs from the wheel to protect them when I laid the wheel on the ground.

I use the old bearings to get the new ones started and then a large socket to drive them the rest of the way. Just make sure you get the bearings seated all the way. If they are off in the bores, the torque of tightening the axle could force it out of alignment and cause rapid wear. The socket should ensure a uniform seat.
An easy trick to make installation faster is toss the new bearings in the freezer for 20 minutes before install. I used a little Lucas oil stabilizer as an installation lube but you probably don't need to worry about it. Any lubricant will basically be forced out as these are interference fit and the bearings will expand as they warm.

Slide the axle all the way through the newly installed bearings to line up the spacer and to make sure everything fits, then apply a little lube or grease to the axle and install the wheel. I had to remove one of the calipers to get the front wheel off. If you get the front end high enough, you won't need to remove the fender. Finally, make sure you degrease and clean any part you touch before reinstallation. Dirt contamination is the devil.
 

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Heat would make the bearing expand and be harder to drive out. Heat on the wheel hub must be done very carefully, and probably isn't needed anyway.

Above all, drive the old bearings out straight and push the new bearings in straight.

Any oil, grease, or antiseize will help the new bearing slide in. Don't buy the Lucas Oil Stabilizer (for any reason what so ever) Yes, freeze the bearing to slightly shrink it and get it in easier.
 

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When I replaced my wheel bearings, a couple did not want to come out. A few seconds with a heat gun on the hub around the outside of the bearing and they moved much more easily. Aluminum has a linear temperature expansion coefficient 1.7 times that of steel.
 

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You'd be cooking a long time to burn the paint on the wheel but moving the flame or heat source is a good idea. When putting the bearing back in, put it in the freezer for a while and heat the hub to make the installation easier.
 

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Around here, dirt bikes go through wheel bearings. So many water crossings. After a few R&Rs the hub to bearing fit may get loose. Warming the hub for both removal & installing will help prevent this. Chilling the new bearing is a good idea too.
 
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