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Motoman or any other method of break in utilizing cylinder pressure and varying speeds works great.

Babying an engine is the last thing you want to do.
 

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This comes up on all the motorcycle forums I read. General consensous is that it really doesn't matter how the engine is "broke in". The manufacturer's procedure works, Moto guys works. Do what you want it especially with the Strom motor.

Some seem to think that the motor has never been run on a new bike. More than likely the factory redlines the motor through the gears before it gets installed in the frame. Modern motors have much tighter tolerances and don't need extended break in procedure's anyway.
 

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Just ride it like you normally would and follow the oil change procedures.
+1 on this.

In fact, the chief technician told me before I rode mine out of the shop when I asked him about a break in period...he just smiled and told me to "ride it like you just stole it!" He suggested not going over 9,000 RPM's until it had a few hundred miles on it but otherwise, "let 'er rip!"...... :mrgreen:

Cheers!

Pat
 

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Madness!

Seriously though, who is more likely to offer the more credible advise on engine break-in; the outfit that designed, manufactures, warrants and whose reputation depends on the engine performance and durability or some guy on the internet?

More specifically, engine break-in is not all about ring to cylinder wall sealing, all of the other contact points within the engine are a consideration as well. While contemporary manufacturing methods do yield improved tolerances between parts compared to the methods of yore, there is still a wearing in process at numerous contact points within the engine; e.g. cam lobes to followers, bearings to journals, etc. Until they do wear in there is increased localized heating at these concentrated points of contact. To avoid damage from this localized heating, engine speeds and loads are best kept at moderate levels.

One thing I did not see in the referenced article, but have in other articles recommending the 'ride it hard' break-in method, is that racing engines do not receive a moderate speeding/loading break-in and maximum performance is demanded from racing engines. Engines used for racing typically don't have the time or mileage available to reasonably allow a moderate speed/load break-in. Secondly, longevity is not a priority in racing applications. Even endurance racing applications have a goal of only several thousand miles or so before rebuilds. For street applications we're looking for much, much more.
 

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Madness!

Seriously though, who is more likely to offer the more credible advise on engine break-in; the outfit that designed, manufactures, warrants and whose reputation depends on the engine performance and durability or some guy on the internet?

More specifically, engine break-in is not all about ring to cylinder wall sealing, all of the other contact points within the engine are a consideration as well. While contemporary manufacturing methods do yield improved tolerances between parts compared to the methods of yore, there is still a wearing in process at numerous contact points within the engine; e.g. cam lobes to followers, bearings to journals, etc. Until they do wear in there is increased localized heating at these concentrated points of contact. To avoid damage from this localized heating, engine speeds and loads are best kept at moderate levels.

One thing I did not see in the referenced article, but have in other articles recommending the 'ride it hard' break-in method, is that racing engines do not receive a moderate speeding/loading break-in and maximum performance is demanded from racing engines. Engines used for racing typically don't have the time or mileage available to reasonably allow a moderate speed/load break-in. Secondly, longevity is not a priority in racing applications. Even endurance racing applications have a goal of only several thousand miles or so before rebuilds. For street applications we're looking for much, much more.

LMAO.......no the madness is following recommendations written by lawyers. And you do realize that some out there on the internet, are very much experts on certain subject matter? ;) The discussions of engine break in just cracks me up, it is right up there with being told you should not use synthetic oil until the engine is good and broken in. :green_lol:
 

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For over 30 years now ALL bikes, trucks, & cars have had the dog poop run outta them ( with NO sustained loads however) by myself and I have not had ANY oil burners, etc. as a result and have all been strong performers. (Even the '08+ "Oil Burning" KLR 650's).
NOTE: I also do stuff like change the oil & filter @ 25~100 miles, do a refill, usually w/ Rotella, run it to 1000~1500 miles and then start to feed it Mobil 1 full synthetic per manufactures recommendations (15~ 50 for bikes).
It works WELL for me & my enlightened buddies for decades now. :thumbup:
 

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Break in methods are like religions to me. Devoted people have allegiance to their own beliefs and think other practices will send the holders to hell. Any actual differences before anyone dies seem less than apparent. Extremists may be the exception in both cases. I would neither baby engines nor beat them.
 

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I'm with MotoWBK on this one.
I've broken in 8 new bikes following the manual (more or less) over the last 20 years. Based on my long term experiences with those bikes I see no reason to do otherwise

On the other hand I also agree with greywolf that break in preferences is like religion which makes it a prickly topic on almost any motorcycle forum.
 

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People are always allowed to do what they want. It's no skin off my scalp.

What cracks me up are the people that buy a new car, truck, motorcycle, or whatever else that has miles on the odometer from test driving. If you don't think that unit hasn't been beat on like a rented mule at some point, you're fooling yourselves.

Now if you took it out of the crate yourself, that would be one thing.

My point is, they typically all run fine the rest of their lives.

I just feel bad for the people that ride around for thousands of miles putting around missing out on an enjoyable experience right out of the box. You can do this without riding all the way to redline btw.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A comment. Decades ago the Vett's were built in a plant in St. Louis. I toured the plant. 10 per hour came off the line. Last stop. Wheels on the rollers. Start it up, with no warm up, and run max RPM's in every gear!:yikes:

Then the new owner took it an followed the procedures in the manual w/o knowing what happened in the factory. :mrgreen:
 

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Why is it most people put such effort and concern into "breaking in" a motorcycle but when it comes to a car, pick up or truck it goes right out the window?

Run it hard IMO
 

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Buy motorcycle. Ride motorcycle. Change oil. Repeat steps 2 & 3 as necessary.
 

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A comment. Decades ago the Vett's were built in a plant in St. Louis. I toured the plant. 10 per hour came off the line. Last stop. Wheels on the rollers. Start it up, with no warm up, and run max RPM's in every gear!:yikes:

Then the new owner took it an followed the procedures in the manual w/o knowing what happened in the factory. :mrgreen:
Same exact thing happens with motorcycles at the factory, same exact thing. :fineprint:
 

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I've only had 2 new bikes and I followed the OEM procedure. I will continue to do so, works for me! No engine problems for me, 60k on one and 20k+ on the other.

Not going to change the O&F after 25 miles, not doing motoman.
 

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I follow the manual also. Its written by experts not interweb "technicians" looking for popularity by voicing a contrary "theory".

Factory run ups are for testing, not break in and run ups last a few seconds or minutes at most. A break in takes several days. Are we saying this is the same thing?

Why would the manufactures risk publishing a procedure that creates oil burning engines and risk warranty returns from customers.

Your engine, break it in like you want, use the oil you want.

I do all my new vehicles (2 or 4 wheel) the same way. Most people that get to test drive a new car have a dealer salesman with them so it is hard to go to the drag strip. My Tenere came from the crate and had less than a mile on it. I typically put 200,000 to 400,000 miles on my cages and over 50,000 on my bikes (two over 100,000 miles).

YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the differing viewpoints.:thumbup:

Since I pick up my new bike tomorrow, I will have to decide.

I'm human so I think whatever way I do things is the best way. I think that's where the religion part comes into motorcycle stuff. I belong to the church of FRAM filters, dyno oil and changing both when I darn well feel like it.

If it wasn't I would do it differently. And, being male, I can change, if I have to, I guess, but I don't want to.

And to add a little levity:



 

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Stay within factory recommendations, but use lots of throttle opening to get there... a little overshoot on rpm won't hurt...
 
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