StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking that I would like to add a GPS to the strom. It will probably not be used very often because I don't get to take many trips. But, I would like to be able to stick it on there and take back roads that are poorly marked without missing turns.

So, I'm looking for a GPS that is the equivalent of a Strom. A good reliable piece of equipment that is everything you need without being super expensive. If I could use it in the cage and the strom both that would be a big plus.

Suggestions for features that you consider must haves are good and specific models that have those features are even better. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I just went through this for my purchase of a GPS (well...a birthday gift from family+friends to me anyway). After looking around at the different brands and prices of the many GPS on the market, I was :confused: and getting :furious:. I asked one of my friends who is very well connected with a riding group who has 'members' that do everything from off-road to strictly road, to fire roads. His response was either Garmin or DeLorme.

He explained that the Delorme was better for the off-roads and that Garmin was better for the highway+some off-road. I decided to purchase the Garmin Zumo 220. I liked that it came water proof, was usable in both car and on the bike, and I was able to download the topo maps that I would want. At $400, it was A LOT pricier than I wanted to spend, BUT I figured that it would be a good purchase, and provide some very useful information.

So I would say...if you're doing a LOT of off-road, look at the Delorme, but if you're doing the highway miles, consider a Garmin...maybe not the 220, but definitely something waterproof... (granted if you're like me, I don't like riding in the rain, so avoid that as much as possible.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
If you do mostly road riding, and don't plan on riding in heavy rain (intentionally, at least) then the Garmin Nuvi family is very good for the price.
Has most of the features of its much pricier brothers.

I have the Nuvi 360 and it does a fantastic job - including being an MP3 player with audio output, and supporting blutooth (nice to see that wife is calling, you answer and she is relaxed..)

If I was to buy a new one I would probably go with a wider screen version (4.3) that has life time updates of maps, like the Garmin Nuvi 1390LMT:
Amazon.com: Garmin nüvi 1390LMT 4.3-Inch Portable GPS Navigator with Lifetime Map & Traffic Updates: Electronics
For $182 it is really good value.

Also I wrote about my experiences in hooking up the Nuvi GPS in this thread:
http://www.stromtrooper.com/techy-world-gps-electronics-etc/62192-advice-needed-gps-wiring.html

It might help you. Very highly recommend of the Strombone - super elegant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
Garmin Custom POI

BTW, slightly off topic but related.
My Nuvi 360 does not have routes, but it does have Custom POI (Points Of Interest), which work as a decent alternative.

I found a relatively easy way to design routes using Google Maps, then convert them using Google Earth into Custom POI coordinates file.
Essentially this file is a CSV file (Comma Separated File) with POI names and coordinates (long & lat).
I wrote a small XSL (sorry, technical computer stuff :yikes: ) file to transform the GoogleEarth KMZ file (which is really XML) to that CSV..and the output is a numbered CSV file.
So each coordinate starts with a prefix (01_<TITLE>, 02_<TITLE>, etc.)

Then a quick upload to the Nuvi using their free utility, GarminPoiLoader.
Anyway, works like a charm.
One does have to select the next POI when the last POI was reached, but if the POIs are not too close to each other you don't have to do it too often. It also makes the GPS route less automatic which I like, as it remind me of navigating with a map - the rider has more control.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
301 Posts
GPS - General Planning System

I have the Nuvi 500 and it seems to work well when used the right way. What I mean by that is I use to load a route (a bit of a pia when you are trying to stay on the roads not often traveled) and then have the thing on when I rode on the roads less traveled. A BIG distraction and possibly dangerous too.

So what I do now is I pop in my destination for the day, look at a real map, find some interesting roads, and then try to get lost. At some point (this is the tricky part) I turn on the GPS and tell it to take me to my destination for the day. A few times I turned it on a bit late (guess I did not feel that I was lost enough earlier in the day) and ended up riding a bit longer into the day than I originally intended.

Another option is to pick up a smart phone (preferrably one that is ruggedized) and use several of the GPS mapping options that are available. My brother currently uses this approach and I like it because it is one less thing to carry. The galpal does the same thing with her Droid and can actually get real time traffic updates from Google Maps so she can avoid any traffic jams during the trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Quite often the choice is personal and "popular". I'm going to get bashed for this but I use a TOM TOM for it's simplicity. When I say simplicity I only mean it's use and not it's capability. Google maps or Google Earth routs downloaded straight into my TT with one button. No conversions and no work a-rounds. They are loaded into the TT as a trip with all the info you want to put on the map. One, two, thee, four day trip with pictures, notes or other info if you like. All dropped into the GPS with no fuss and can be edited on your computer or on the fly. At this point I have well over a dozen three day trips (plus a lot of one and two day trips) or something like 25000 miles of way points. But like I said. Tom Tom doesn't have the techy elite status so most people don't bother looking at them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
I have both a Garmin Nuvi 360 and a Nuvi 755. I like the larger screen, route planning/saving, and "3D View" of the 755, but have not been impressed with its map resolution - several mid-size side roads in my area don't display. It will recognize you are on them, but they don't show on the map, even though smaller crossroads will display.
But I agree - any of the Nuvi series is a good value - quite a few options for under $150, and some under $100. Also, they have been pretty durable. My 360 has taken two spills at 50+ mph and it still works fine, just a few scuffs on the corners.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
520 Posts
He said cheap ... For three years I've used my car's Garmin Nuvi 200 series GPS using an inexpensive waterproof handlebar mount that can be purchased on-line. I used it on my old XR 650 and on my Wee, twice in all day down pours with zero leaks. No doubt the Zumo with Touratech alum mount is nicer but costs hundreds more!

Available on-line, for example Amazon has it for under $24 currently in stock:
http://www.amazon.com/Motorcycle-WATERPROOF-Handlebar-Mount-Garmin/dp/B0035TZS14

Also when someone stole the Garmin out of my (unlocked) car I replaced it with a used (but newer) Nuvi 200 series wide purchased on craigslist for $55. Either a small or wide screen will fit. So for under $100 all day long you can buy mount and good used Garmin (craigslist) and have it in car too.

Front (note: flexible clear front allows touch screen operation):
http://www.stromtrooper.com/members/kevinp-albums-my-current-bikes-picture3531-gps-mount.html

Top (note: waterproof zipper and taped seam):
http://www.stromtrooper.com/members/kevinp-albums-my-current-bikes-picture3532-gps-mount-top.html

bottom (note: grommet for plug):
http://www.stromtrooper.com/members/kevinp-albums-my-current-bikes-picture3534-gps-mount-bottom-large.html
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
412 Posts
+1 for the Nuvi 500/550. It's waterproof (huge +), works well, is easy to use, and a lot cheaper than the Zumo's. I use it on the bike as a good speedo (gives actual speed), and as a rolling map. It's it's like having a road map in a tank bag, but it's electronic.


Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,663 Posts
I think I disagree

There is a NEW series of Garmins out which I believe are like 2350 and 2360.

These have ROUTES like the high end units. You get MAPSOURCE and you can lay out a road route and the GPS follows and direct s you back to the routes NOT a destination. Cheap units take you places "where to" but not follow routes, they decide what roads to take. I do use my cheapy to extricate myself from being lost assuming you know a local town or highway.

I use my Garmin 300 hiker ( now discontinued but 450 still there) it takes routes no audio. If you get off track it takes you back to the nearest point on your route. I am cheap and it is also a hiker and does geocahing like I want to do with my boys in the woods.

It is a tragedy that Garmin must have made a devils deal with BMW to artificially hold the MC ones to a ridiculous high price
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
The Garmin Nuvi 550 for me. It's cheap and it's waterproof. you can also program in routes and way points. I've had mine for just over a year and it's been through some torrential downpours with no ill effects on the unit (can say as much for the rider).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
So, I'm looking for a GPS that is the equivalent of a Strom. A good reliable piece of equipment that is everything you need without being super expensive. If I could use it in the cage and the strom both that would be a big plus.

Suggestions for features that you consider must haves are good and specific models that have those features are even better. Thanks
Buy the cheapest Garmin Nuvi you can get your hands on, and get (or make) a mount of some for it. It won't do custom routes or anything like that, but it'll show you where you are, how to get there from here, and so on. You can get something like a Garmin Nuvi 255W for probably under $100. If you want some of the higher-end features, like custom routes, freeway interchange display, etc, you're going to have to spend a bunch more money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
969 Posts
Buy the cheapest Garmin Nuvi you can get your hands on, and get (or make) a mount of some for it. It won't do custom routes or anything like that, but it'll show you where you are, how to get there from here, and so on. You can get something like a Garmin Nuvi 255W for probably under $100. If you want some of the higher-end features, like custom routes, freeway interchange display, etc, you're going to have to spend a bunch more money.
Why would you do that if you can get all the high end features plus lifetime maps for the same price in a TOM TOM?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,310 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Budget GPS

I highly recommend not wasting money on a GPS. Get an iphone or Android and download a free navigation app. always accurate and up to date cartography...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
ditto on the Nuvi 550.

I've had one for years. It moves between bikes. Simple, effective, waterproof, and not very expensive. You can get US+Canada or US+hiking/off-road, I think. Either way, you can add the other option at a later date -- but that drives the overall price up a bit. You can even switch the car icon to a motorcycle... :hurray:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
If you plan to do any significant amount of dirt riding, I'd get a Garmin 60csx. If you don't, any of the other options mentioned are fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
+1 on the Nuvi 550. I paid $200, waterproof, glove friendly, big enough screen that I don't need my reading glasses, I can't hear it on the bike (god she was annoying!) telling me when to turn. Expandable memory with mini SD cards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,599 Posts
Really cheap

Got a Garmin eTrex Legend on clearance for $75. Picked up handlebar mounts for all my bikes (motor and otherwise). No routing, but has maps of highways and major city streets. My favorite screen shows distance traveled, direction (synthetic compass), and speed. Runs on 2 AA's for 18 hours, is waterproof, quickly slips into a pocket, and requires no wiring. Wouldn't use it for a cross-country trip, but since I don't do those on the bike no problem. Very handy for dusty back roads, since you know what direction you are going, and how to get to the nearest major road.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top