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A beginner track day changed everything for me on the street. I posted earlier with a different theme. I'm pretty aware on the street and have seen enough oil, sand, gravel and such on paved corners to not be crazy out there. But I'll encourage anyone to do a basic track day at a race track. You learn what the bike can do and you'll be amazed at what it and you can do if you wish. It helps you stay in your lane when the corner is sharper than anticipated and many other things to improve your street riding.
 

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A beginner track day changed everything for me on the street. I posted earlier with a different theme. I'm pretty aware on the street and have seen enough oil, sand, gravel and such on paved corners to not be crazy out there. But I'll encourage anyone to do a basic track day at a race track. You learn what the bike can do and you'll be amazed at what it and you can do if you wish. It helps you stay in your lane when the corner is sharper than anticipated and many other things to improve your street riding.
Did a track day on my '85 GL1200 Limited. Got a lot of looks from everyone when I pulled into the track. Had already done a suspension upgrade so I was confident that it would do well. Had a great time, and learned a lot about me and the bike. Hooked one of the corner pylons once and felt the rear tire lift then settle back down. Straightened up, rode off the course and caught my breath. Next few laps were a bit slower. Very fortunate the bike didn't decide to lay down. The track gods were looking out for me that day.

When I went on a Total Control course by Lee Parks, he was the lead facilitator and gave the intro. He mentioned that all bikes are very well designed, will do everything you can think of, some better than others, but all bets are off once we get on them. Another course I went on, asked the lead instructor if he ever rode student bikes to demo. He mentioned he did so I gave him the keys to my 2008 Suzuki C90T. He dragged the pegs, did u-turns and figure 8s without a problem. He mentioned that he had never rode this make/model before, and told me that the bike will do the course, he wasn't sure about the owner. Had a great time on the course.

Just a few thoughts.

Cheers
 

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MSF course (discounted insurance!!), but the really fun one I took was Rawhyde off-the-pavement course (geared towards BMW owners but you can bring your own bike).... That one was so fun and now I always keep knobbier tires on the bike "just in case" I find trails or forest service roads etc to go on. So fun!!!
 

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2015 DL650
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I do enjoy taking courses and practing in a parking lot. All the classes have been very educational and fun. The most memorable are RawHyde and the Track Day. RawHyde is Disneyland for motorcyclists, basically an all inclusive motorcycle course - awesome instructors and you meet riders from all over US. The track day because I never thought I do it, and taught me how to important brakes are while cornering.

SuperBike coach cornering classes 1-3
Intermediate MSF course
Track-day
RawHyde Intro
American SuperCamp

I have enjoyed all my classes and looking forward to taking more. The plus side is the other riders you met, and being open minded to different techniques and instruction.

Cheers
 

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I started riding in 2016, so am relatively new, although I use my bike nearly every day and commute to work on it.

In British Columbia, when we take the MSA course, it gives us a "New Driver's" graduated licencing. We can carry that for a year, then you have to do a road test. It's involved, see: ICBC - Get your Motorcycle Licence.

In the early spring of 2018 here in Greater Vancouver, on a muddy, rainy day, I took an off road riding course. Have never put it to use. Then at the Touratech Rally last year, I took one with Brett Tcaks which was great, but showed my limits on handling the V-Strom.

I plan on doing my local off-road school again this year, and actually committing to riding off road a bit. I'm enlisting some friends in that. If I take the course in April, then the trails will start to dry out over the next couple of months and I can get a few km's on some good fire roads.

Yes, I'm a belt and suspenders kind of guy. But this is the way I look at it.

I downhill ski, and have for years. One lesson a year helps, as I always walk away from it with more knowledge and another tool in my tool belt, plus often a bunch of technical reminders.

Given what we have to do to get a motorcycle licence in BC, I was shocked - SHOCKED! - to find out that most US states only require the MSA and low-speed control in a parking lot.
 

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Graduated licensing here, so started out taking the beginner course in 2003 to get the basic license.
Took the second course 5 years later to get the full moto license.
Took the Lee Parks Level 1 & 2 courses a few years later and took the Total Control skills days for a few years to frequently revisit good habits.
Became a moto instructor and taught for 6 years, which was a good way to keep up the good habits as well.

Stopped teaching and taking courses for a couple years now. Went down to Deals Gap last year for 8 days of relentless twisties and was surprised at how weak my technique had become. It took a few days of riding twisty roads to get the good habits back.

Hopefully next year will get another course in of some sort.
Nothing beats having someone watch me and video my technique for the sole purpose of providing feedback.
 

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School of hard knocks 1958-1980, then NSF Basic one day course in 1980, then another NSF class for four wheelers in about 1992, both required by my employer. I learned more about safe motoring in Drivers Ed. at 14 and reading motorcycle magazines than any other source. Crashing a dirt bike on occasion is a workable learning tool as well.
 

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I started riding in the late fifties on a old rat A.J.S pushed it more than rode it. Dirt bikes in the Ca. desert in the 60s And 70s that taught me a lot. Sport Bikes in the 80s & 90s. I took a Keith Code Super bike class at Willow Springs level 4 on both times in 88 and 93 best money I ever spent. Now at 84 yrs. old I cover 15 to 20 thousand a yr. most of it touring. Never had a accident, I feel due to dirt riding and Superbike school...
 

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MSF Basic Rider, before I got my 'Strom
MSF Refresher after I got my 'Strom
MSF ARC, twice in consecutive years
Virginia State Police "Ride2SaveLives" workshop, twice in consecutive years
 

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MSF rider basic course to get my license, then an off-road basics one day clinic. Plus years of road riding in between. It's been a while, I would like to do another road course some time.
 

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Graduated licensing here, so started out taking the beginner course in 2003 to get the basic license.
Took the second course 5 years later to get the full moto license.
Took the Lee Parks Level 1 & 2 courses a few years later and took the Total Control skills days for a few years to frequently revisit good habits.
Became a moto instructor and taught for 6 years, which was a good way to keep up the good habits as well.

Stopped teaching and taking courses for a couple years now. Went down to Deals Gap last year for 8 days of relentless twisties and was surprised at how weak my technique had become. It took a few days of riding twisty roads to get the good habits back.

Hopefully next year will get another course in of some sort.
Nothing beats having someone watch me and video my technique for the sole purpose of providing feedback.
The skills go away quickly. After owning a race track and ridding school, I miss the annual check ride. We all develop bad habits. The ST1300 spoiled me. It took a day on the track to remember how to ride a bike that does not forgive.
Being an old Marine, I preform best when someone I respect is in my face telling me how I F*ucked up.
 

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I took Tom Asher class a few years ago and it greatly improved my confidence on gravel and dirt. Tom Asher is supposed to be coming back to Indiana in May and I intend on taking it again on a bigger bike than my DL650.

 

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Almost none.
I do practice my skills and have spent plenty of time reading/watching and thinking about my riding skills, though.

Some years ago after a couple of close calls when riding hard I took a race course to develop more confidence in cornering, and leaning the bike further (when necessary).

That's why I also still like to push my limits a little on the road, because halfway through a turn is not the place to discover that you need to learn further but you're not sure how far you can lean. Of course for that to be useful you need to generally be riding well short of your or the bike's limits.
 

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MSF BRC of course, in late 2016 before I started.

Knocked out ARC and BRC 2 the next year. They're given for free (you just need access to the base) on the military installation where I work.

Didn't go to any trainings in 2018.

Only managed Ride Like A Pro in 2019.

I'd like to do American Supercamp some time but I don't see it happening. I just had to buy a replacement (not new) car, so there goes all my "fun" money for a while. :/
 

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BRC, 1991

MSF RiderCoach training, 2014

BRC, 2014

TCTI Instructor “conversion” training, 2016

And that’s about it.
 
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