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I have been searching without luck...
Having never been on a road trip, but planning to do one in the near future for at least a week, and planning on camping. I was looking for ideas as far as what to pack.
Do you frequent long distance riders have a list that you go by?...wanna share?

thanks
 

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Headlamp
Sleeping bag
Sleeping pad
Backpackers pillow
Tent
Coffee cup
Instant coffee
Extra underwear and socks
Sunscreen
Toothbrush/toothpaste
Camp suds
Washcloth/microfiber/towel
Parachute chord/bungies for tying things

You may want to add a mini tool kit and some chain lube.

These are just a few examples that I make sure and take everytime. Depending on where you're going you may want to add other things. This time of year I take my water shoes and bathing suit.

I also take my backpacker stove and some food items that can be prepped just by adding water. I usually don't need them as many times when I'm on the road I only eat one meal a day. So its' a personal decision. I carry alot and don't care for the weight; but since I generally use everything I bring; I think it's fine.

PS. Also, if camping in grizzly bear territory bring some bear spray. I guess a guy was just eaten up in Yellowstone recently.
 

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I have seen sites that have lists. I just typed in motorcycle road trip, and got lots of stuff. But I think the biggest, useful advice I got was, "Remember, you are just on a back pack trip, on 2 wheels, less is more".
This is what it looked like for 6 days. If it doesnt fit in my back pack, it doesn't need to go.
 

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Cell phone, Fix-A-Flat, bottled water, MREs, lighter, bungee nets/cords, duct tape, tools.
 

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As has already been mentioned treat it as a back packing trip and make a pile of only the things that you absolutely must take then cut it in half.
The main things are that you must be able to stay warm and dry. In Florida at the moment they probably aren't major issues so I'd be thinking gear to ride in, a set of clothes for at camp and camping equipment plus personal hygiene and toiletries.
 

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My packing list

We had a thread on this subject a couple of years ago. I kept a list of the suggestions, refined it, and use it for my own packing list. I hope this is helpful.


VOICE OF REASON'S
MOTORCYCLE CAMPING CHECKLIST

Campsite items:
Tent (2-person for just me, 3-person if traveling 2-up)
Sleeping bag
Sheet (if warm)
Thermarest pad
Inflatable pillow
Alite Monarch folding chair
Repair tape

Cooking items:
Stove (dual-fuel; white gas or unleaded)
Cooking pot
Plate, bowl, cup (if traveling light, just a cup and a spoon)
Plastic silverware
Folding cooler (for daily shopping trip)
Flask, filled (pre-mixed Manhattans, thank you)
Coffee press
Coffee
Cutting board (the knife is in my pocket)
Cooking supplies (spices, oil, utensils)
Cleaning supplies (soap, sponge)
Collapsible water jug
Recipes/menu plan for x days (ideas for those shopping trips)

Personal items:
Clothes for x days (re-use, wash-and-wear, less is better)
Shoes (comfortable walking shoes)
Flashlight and batteries
Camera
Hat
Spare glasses
Pen and paper
Travel kit (shaving gear, toothbrush, comb, etc.)
Camp towel
Swimming suit
Bug spray/sunscreen
Normal pocket stuff (knife, cellphone, wallet, keys, etc.)

Motorcycle items:
Tools (always on board, but I'll list them anyway)
Tire repair kit (ditto)

This works for me. YMMV.

Voice
 

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As many have said:

Tire plug kit.........always "on-board", but also store a 12V air compressor, bicycle pump, or those CO2 cartridges somewhere on the bike to re-inflate the repaired tire??
 

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Cooking items:
Stove (dual-fuel; white gas or unleaded)
Cooking pot
Plate, bowl, cup (if traveling light, just a cup and a spoon)
Plastic silverware
Folding cooler (for daily shopping trip)
Flask, filled (pre-mixed Manhattans, thank you)
Coffee press
Coffee
Cutting board (the knife is in my pocket)
Cooking supplies (spices, oil, utensils)
Cleaning supplies (soap, sponge)
Collapsible water jug
Recipes/menu plan for x days (ideas for those shopping trips)
- Jetboil Stove
- A few assorted freeze dried dinners
- Spoon
- Thermal cup
- Tea bags
- Water bottle

Much lighter.
 

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For food I carry peanut butter, honey (keeps well) bread or tortillas, a couple of apples and oranges, bag of prunes, which are nutritious and keep well and your favorite 2 or 3 cans of sardines. With this I can stop for lunch somewhere quiet anytime. Will work for breakfast and dinner if/when options are limited.
 

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Hiking or Biking?

- Jetboil Stove
- A few assorted freeze dried dinners
- Spoon
- Thermal cup
- Tea bags
- Water bottle

Much lighter.
No doubt they are much lighter, and for a hiking or canoeing trip I'd take my Pocket Rocket and some homemade prepared meals from the One Pan Wonders cookbook (Home - One Pan Wonders - highly recommended, try the pepperoni pizza rice!).

But on the V-Strom I feel I can afford the weight of the Coleman dual fuel stove, which gives me a little more flexibility (and works better than the Pocket Rocket when it's cold in the morning). I also happen to like shopping for fresh food after a day in the saddle, to see what I can concoct back at the campsite, but maybe that's just me.

Similarly, you are absolutely correct that a person can get by just fine on nothing more than a cup and a spoon, and the cleanup time is wonderful, but I like those folding origami plates and bowls you can get at any hiking store (Orikaso, or something like that, is the brand name). They also double as a cutting board; I forgot to take that item off my list.

Finally, coffee is non-negotiable!

Seriously, you make a great point: Lightness is a virtue all by itself.

Voice
 

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I started to sleep on my clothes instead of a pillow when winter hiking in New Hampshire when I was younger. I would skip the inflatable pillow.

I would also make sure you have some way to hang wet clothes on the back of your bike so you can "wash" them every other night. Where nylon fabrics as much as possible and avoid cottons if possible.
 

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I vote pre moistened butt wipes..

If you are going to launch on a multi day into the boondocks I would spend an evening thru breakfast in the back yard.

You will discover what your missing or can double up on

It is also smart to know where medical help s found and where the nearest walmart is
 

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This is my list for a long trip. I can cut this down some for less than a week. All the crap listed weighs less than 100lbs


$$$MONEY$$$- take lots
Stove
Chain lube
pan/frying, and pot with lid
Tools
pot scrubber
Tire repair kit
Hobo knife
Spare key
Tent
Glasses
Thermacell and refills
BOOK to read
Sleeping pad
Radio/batteries
Sleeping bag
Rain suit
Hand soap
Toilet paper
Toothbrush
TOWEL
Tooth paste
shaver
Flashlight
Hat
Food for breakfast only.
Coffee
Camera
In addition to what I'm wearing:
1 pair pants
2 undershirts
1 dress shirt
2 pair underwear
2 pair socks
Cell phone
Medication
lighter/matches
Thong shoes
Monkey butt powder
Journal and pencil

Chapstick
Sweater
Rubber sink
fishing gear
 

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It has been said many times before, and worth saying once more...when planning on what to pack you should lay out everything you intend to bring, and than remove half of it.

Most of what has been mentioned already are good items, but people generally have the notion to over-pack.

There are certain items that you will NEED, and there are certain items that you will WANT. You will have to be clever and decide what is which.

No matter what: cell phone, charge card, and cash. Always.
 
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