StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I posted this on the 650 thread as well...

I'm riding a '14 1000 and quite like it, but have a couple of nagging gripes so am thinking of treating myself for my 60th to a new bike. Two serious contenders are the new V strom 650 and 1000. I do the usual 90% pavement, touring, and 10% dirt exploring and wild camping. I've done some off-road training.

Here are the gripes: the seat is not all-day comfy. I paid a fortune for a Corbin and hate it. Don't want to take a chance on buying another seat. I hate the snatchy throttle off-road and Suzuki hasn't been able to cure it. Don't want to spend the money for a Dynojet and tuning. I've already spent a fortune upgrading the bike for touring and off-road camping. It's a bit top-heavy and a handful off-road.

Likes are the fully adjustable suspension. It's awesome. The power. It's a nice motor. Those are the things I'm afraid I'd miss the most.

I know that I need to ride the new ones to see for sure, but I'm looking for thoughts and opinions.

The new 650 would be lighter by 30lbs. Cheaper to insure by a few hundred dollars a year. The throttle-assist feature might take care of the snatchy throttle off-road. I think the seat is better. It now has a power outlet on the dash, which I use. Owners love them for years. It would be cheaper to buy. However, will I miss the power and suspension of the 1000??

The new 1000 also has the throttle-assist and better seat (so they say) but also cornering abs. It would be just as heavy as my current bike and just as costly to insure, but I'd keep the power and susp. A bunch of my parts would transfer over.

Both have the option of the fancy gold wire wheels, though I'm on the fence about them. I'm told that we're getting a 3-year warranty on the new bikes in Canada. (don't know about the US)

The other bike I'm looking hard at is.... the 1200GS. Yes, it's terribly expensive, but this will probably be my last big bike. It's very complicated and if there were glitches it would drive me crazy, but all the electronics are supposed to make for an awesome bike. Lower CoG. Good warranty. Expensive insurance and accessories. Do I want to be a GS guy?? I've ridden a couple and love the drivetrain. Amazing. But I need more seat time to form an opinion about the suspension.

So there ya go! Feel free to share any thoughts. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
I don't see your point. You're worried about few hundred for insurance but not worried about almost double a price for GS.
I also own '14 1000. I solved snatchy throttle in first couple months of ownership by installing X-TRE. Few months later came upgraded ECU and X-TRE was not necessary anymore. Then I changed front sprocket to 16T (Suzuki one with dampeners). So, I have perfect bike ever since.
Now, the weight of the bike is something different for every owner. I'm 6ft2.5 and I don't feel my bike top heavy. I owned '12 650 and it didn't feel any "lighter" then 1000 to me.
I like the look of GS but I think the price is joke and I don't think I could stand being part of "GS" club.
There are other bikes you could try: Africa Twin, Super Tenere, Multistrada, KTM...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,224 Posts
1200GS is sweet, but will forever be expensive. You start out with a pricey bike, and when things break (and they will) replacements are similarly expensive, like double what any other bike part costs, similarly with maintenance. But if your OK with that, its a nice bike.

Ducati, not very reliable, same with KTM.

Jap bikes are the most reliable, and the most cost effective, so that leaves you with Tenere, FJ09, AT and V2 (or is it V3 now?).

I would try an AT and Tenere just to see, but would probably end up with a V3 anyways. You could move your parts over, easy switch out, but I wonder if these nagging issues will continue with the new bikes since Suzuki refuses to acknowledge they exist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
This is a tough one ...there is simply no getting around the weight of a full size bike in off road conditions. I am impressed with the stock fueling on 2016 R1200GS, much better than my V2 in my opinion, but it's even a heavier bike (though it carries the weight quite well) ...so while the fueling issue might be solved, it will be just as much if not more of a handful off road for you.
Since your preference is to find a stock solution in form of a new bike, my recommendation would be to test ride every bike that you are interested in before you buy. Take it out for a proper long test ride and judge it yourself, rather than making the purchase based on a review from moto magazine, etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I don't see your point. You're worried about few hundred for insurance but not worried about almost double a price for GS.
I also own '14 1000. I solved snatchy throttle in first couple months of ownership by installing X-TRE. Few months later came upgraded ECU and X-TRE was not necessary anymore. Then I changed front sprocket to 16T (Suzuki one with dampeners). So, I have perfect bike ever since.
Now, the weight of the bike is something different for every owner. I'm 6ft2.5 and I don't feel my bike top heavy. I owned '12 650 and it didn't feel any "lighter" then 1000 to me.
I like the look of GS but I think the price is joke and I don't think I could stand being part of "GS" club.
There are other bikes you could try: Africa Twin, Super Tenere, Multistrada, KTM...
I'm not worried about the insurance, but it would be a nice bonus to save 30% by moving to the 650, but only if I loved the 650. Insurance cost would not be a deciding factor. The price difference between Suzuki and BMW could be a deciding factor though. I'd have to feel like I couldn't live without the GS to pay that kind of money. That may require a few test rides under varying conditions if BMW is willing. Or I suppose I could rent one for a weekend...

Your point about the weight is interesting. That's one of the things I was most wondering about. I haven't ridden a 650 for several years so couldn't remember how much different they feel. If the difference is negligible I may just stick with the 1000 for the extra features. Suzuki is not really upgrading the ECU's over here to my knowledge. Eventually the sync'd the throttle bodies (at my expense) which seemed to help a bit, but didn't solve the problem. They are saying it's normal due to lean fuelling, which they program in on purpose.

I don't see the AT offering any advantage over a VStrom 1000 and the Super Ten is too heavy and I didn't like it, Ducati also expensive to buy and maintain and I found the 1200 too complex, though the new 950 looks interesting, KTM the same $$$

Thanks,

David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
1200GS is sweet, but will forever be expensive. You start out with a pricey bike, and when things break (and they will) replacements are similarly expensive, like double what any other bike part costs, similarly with maintenance. But if your OK with that, its a nice bike.

Ducati, not very reliable, same with KTM.

Jap bikes are the most reliable, and the most cost effective... You could move your parts over, easy switch out, but I wonder if these nagging issues will continue with the new bikes since Suzuki refuses to acknowledge they exist.
All good points. BMW costs worry me because I'm the type of guy who expects a premium experience when I pay a premium price. So if I shell out that kind of money, I expect perfection and complete joy and satisfaction from every ride! Maybe I'm just a Suzuki guy...not that there's anything wrong with that. If the new one solves my niggles, then I'll be pretty darned happy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Misko, I did think the BMW carried its weight better when I rode one. Down low. Seemed more manageable, even though it's a bit heavier, and even easier to pick up because it doesn't lay flat thanks to those cylinders sticking out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
I am a long way from buying my last big bike, but if there is anything I have learned about buying these things it is this..... forget about data, costs, logical and well considered reasoning, and all the other things that would apply to well informed decision making in everyday life. Go for the one that floats your boat and makes you feel like you are alive. Nothing else really matters. Life is too short.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I am a long way from buying my last big bike, but if there is anything I have learned about buying these things it is this..... forget about data, costs, logical and well considered reasoning, and all the other things that would apply to well informed decision making in everyday life. Go for the one that floats your boat and makes you feel like you are alive. Nothing else really matters. Life is too short.
Good advice. I may be overthinking this thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I rode a friend's K7 650 and now own a K2 1000. For me, the difference in power was appreciable and the difference in weight was not. As a commuter, I would like the fuel economy of the 650 but it's just not worth sacrificing the joy of that 1000cc engine.
As for the GS, I have quite a few friends that have them. They all love 'em. I think they have a solid bike with the GS and that is why there is such a huge following, but I also think that each bike has it's own specialty. The KTM is more off road oriented. The Ducati is more sporty. The Africa Twin is also off road oriented but it's a Honda so reliability should not be an issue. The GS is your all arounder. Off road and on road it does a decent job but it's not the best at either. I can't speak much about parts cost on the GS but I can tell you the maintenance, if you don't do it yourself, will cost you. The Strom is your bargain bike with a huge following that you can customize to no end (like the GS), but your initial cost is much lower. I initially bought mine to tip my toes into the adventure bike sector, with plans to buy a multistrada later on. Now, I'm not so sure. The Strom is a great bike and it's shortcomings can be addressed. Ultimately I think it comes down to your usage.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,224 Posts
The 2014 and up DL1000 has nearly the fuel mileage of the 650, when my tank is full it shows a distance of 370km on the tank, about 70k higher than the old DL1000 although actual mileage depends on your right wrist. Keep RPM's below 4k and it is attainable.

I rode a friend's K7 650 and now own a K2 1000. For me, the difference in power was appreciable and the difference in weight was not. As a commuter, I would like the fuel economy of the 650 but it's just not worth sacrificing the joy of that 1000cc engine.
As for the GS, I have quite a few friends that have them. They all love 'em. I think they have a solid bike with the GS and that is why there is such a huge following, but I also think that each bike has it's own specialty. The KTM is more off road oriented. The Ducati is more sporty. The Africa Twin is also off road oriented but it's a Honda so reliability should not be an issue. The GS is your all arounder. Off road and on road it does a decent job but it's not the best at either. I can't speak much about parts cost on the GS but I can tell you the maintenance, if you don't do it yourself, will cost you. The Strom is your bargain bike with a huge following that you can customize to no end (like the GS), but your initial cost is much lower. I initially bought mine to tip my toes into the adventure bike sector, with plans to buy a multistrada later on. Now, I'm not so sure. The Strom is a great bike and it's shortcomings can be addressed. Ultimately I think it comes down to your usage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
The 2014 and up DL1000 has nearly the fuel mileage of the 650, when my tank is full it shows a distance of 370km on the tank, about 70k higher than the old DL1000 although actual mileage depends on your right wrist. Keep RPM's below 4k and it is attainable.
The right wrist is definitely a factor, as well as the 16/43 gearing, but I may have to look into the 2014 and up when the time comes to upgrade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,939 Posts
When planning a trip on my V2 I work on 350km between fuel stops, sometimes that is being ambitious but most of the time it has a reasonable safety factor built in. (I carry extra fuel with me now)

On my Wee I planned 450km between stops, sometimes that is being ambitious but most of the time it has a good safety factor built in (I never felt the need to carry extra fuel but did have a big scare once)

I will point out that I never ride for economy, just for fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
I posted this on the 650 thread as well...

I'm riding a '14 1000 and quite like it
Good start.

Here are the gripes: the seat is not all-day comfy.
Sell the seat and try something else. You could spend 15000 on a new ride and still hate the seat. If you still have the oem seat then try Seat Concepts or go all out with one of the many custom seat makers.



I've already spent a fortune upgrading the bike for touring and off-road camping. It's a bit top-heavy and a handful off-road.
A lot of those upgrades you'll probably do on the new bike as well. The 650 won't feel lighter or all that different off road, plus the suspension and brakes aren't as good.


Likes are the fully adjustable suspension. It's awesome. The power. It's a nice motor. Those are the things I'm afraid I'd miss the most.
I know that I need to ride the new ones to see for sure
Dont forget bmw f800gs and Africa Twin! Will the AT have cruise control in 2017?

The other bike I'm looking hard at is.... the 1200GS.
!
I wouldn't get a modern bmw, seems somewhat unreliable, expensive to maintain and a limited dealer network.

The fact of the matter is there aren't any 500lbs bikes that are very comfortable for all day touring and great in the dirt, they are all compromise machines, and some emphasize the road more than the dirt. Which do you see yourself riding more in 5 years?

Unless you are bored of what you have and just plain want a new bike, you're probably better off just spending a bit more time and money sorting out the seat and installing a good tuner to smooth out the FI.

Sent from my SM-T700 using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: blues hurler

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I'd keep the '14 DL1000 since you have it already.. I think it's a great mc; I'm looking at the Yamaha Tenere as my next steed but waiting until my '05 DL650 no longer serves me
 
  • Like
Reactions: blues hurler

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
keep the 2014 and make it yours by changing what you don't like.
Why throw good money away (depreciation) when you can spend a grand or two to make it the way you want to? ....... unless you're really looking for a reason to convince yourself to buy again.
I just returned from 4 days away to our Snowy Mountains region via twisty hwy and several dirt sections on new Anakee 3s and can't think what I'd like to do it on more than this bike.
24kms per litre average for 1740kms won't be bettered by any other 1,000+cc bike and secure sidewall to sidewall handling - no chicken strips - convinced me of its worth. A joy to ride (as was my more sedate riding partner's 650XT).
I wonder how much the lure of every new piece of technology messes with our heads
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
keep the 2014 and make it yours by changing what you don't like...

...I wonder how much the lure of every new piece of technology messes with our heads
:iagree:
This!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
just for fun:
I covered 435 kms (270 miles) to get home yesterday on one tank - a new PB for me.

I expect she'll take nearly 20 litres since "Range" indicates 4kms left. I may take my fuel bladder with a litre in it tomorrow just to see what it'll read by hiccup time.
The trick as mentioned by others on numerous occasions is to limit higher speeds - which isn't hard to do on gravel. I did maybe 30 kms at a genuine 110 (117 indicated), the rest between 90 and 100.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
:iagree:
This!!!
I know (sigh). Actually, the more I think about it, and the more the "high" of the bike show wears off, the less interested I become in spending the money. I'll no doubt test a couple of bikes once the snow goes, but I'll have to be mighty impressed to trade. And if I don't trade, I'll just chase down a better seat and take it from there. Thanks for all the input everyone. Great community!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
333 Posts
I know (sigh). Actually, the more I think about it, and the more the "high" of the bike show wears off, the less interested I become in spending the money. I'll no doubt test a couple of bikes once the snow goes, but I'll have to be mighty impressed to trade. And if I don't trade, I'll just chase down a better seat and take it from there. Thanks for all the input everyone. Great community!
Bike shows are there to do that to you.
I've banned myself from bike shows and test rides :wink2:
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top