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Discussion Starter #1
This is the first time I'm going to oil the chain, so I want to do it right.
The bike now has 500 miles so I guess it is a good maintenance point.

Reading the threads here, I got the Dupont Teflon spray (Yellow) and WD-40.
I do have experience cleaning a mountain bike chain using MTB degreaser foam with a tooth brush, then wash with some water, dry with cloth and then oil..

I don't have a center stand, so I guess I would have to go back and forth a bit.

So the question is simple, can someone provide a few clear & simple steps on the correct or recommended clean & oil procedure?

Searched the forum but did not find what I was looking for.
If it is there, I apologize in advance.

Thanks!
 

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Do the work right after a ride. Chain is hot and dry. Remove the guard. Wipe it off with kerosene and a rag. Apply the lube of choice and wipe excess off as you go. Remove the counter sprocket cover once or twice per year and clean the crud out that accumulates in there, and you should be OK. I made a stand to hold mine up
but there are many worthwhile stands on the market. If you get a stand the job is so easy, you will do it more often. The center kick stands allow you to do the work any time, and almost anywhere..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the answers.
A few questions:
1. (Might sound stupid..) Where do I get Kerosene? Can WD-40 be used instead?
2. How does one remove the guard?
3. (Not related directly to topic) Can you post instructions (and sharper images) of your custom made stand. I really like that concept of a stand just for maintenance.
 

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WD-40 can be substituted for kerosene as a cleaner........it's what I use. Don't use it as a lubricate on the chain tho. Everyone has their own techniques and formulas for lubing. I use the spray, and/or 90 wt gear oil swabbed on with a small rag........wearing gloves. I have approximately 25k miles on my ZRX1100 chain......still looks and performs as new.

Oh yeah..........NEVER put the bike on the centerstand, start the motor, put it in gear to get the chain moving, and then try to lube it while in motion..........not unless you want to get the "5 finger discount".
 

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You will get all kinds of advice as to the best way to lube and clean, and whether to use Oil based or teflon based products. If you follow their advice you will have a nice clean chain that probably lasts 20,000 to 25,000 miles. The manual suggests you clean the chain with kerosene and lube it every 1000 km/600 miles, which I did for my first two chains, and I got around 22,000 miles on them


If you don't bother cleaning the chain but lube it immediately after a ride when you fill the tank or after a rain ride you can expect the chain to last over 70,000 km/40,000 miles. (My last chain lubed this way lasted about 72,000 km or 44,600 miles.)

..Tom
 

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I do as VTOM. I do not clean and lube. I lube only. Cleaning chains is very rare for me.

A MTB chain is not O ring and requires cleaning. On an O ring just lube between the plates top and bottom where it hits the rubber rings. I always over lube and make a mess. I use both the Home Depot teflon stuff and Bell Ray Clean Lube which is more $$ but lasts a little longer. I lube at every other tank, but rarely ride in the rain unless it catches me on the highway.
 

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It is a lot easier with the rear wheel off the ground. Since you don't have a center stand I would look at. One of those rear wheel crutches that hold up the wheel via the swing arm. The one I have is from white horse press. It works well and is nice if you get a flat on the road as well
 

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Here's how I do it--
--Wipe the chain off with a dry rag.
--Spray each link of the chain with the lube. While in neutral, balance the bike on the sidestand and roll the wheel a bit (with a helper or your foot). Spray more until done. You can make a short piece of wood to prop under the rear axle nut to get the rear wheel off the ground or buy or make something to do the job. Never, ever prop the rear wheel off the floor, rotate it with the engine, and get your fingers anywhere near the running chain & sprocket.
--Ride. Enjoy.

By the way, the Dupont Teflon Multi-Use Lubricant in the blue can is the same stuff and $5 at Lowe's.
 

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I do as VTOM. I do not clean and lube. I lube only. Cleaning chains is very rare for me.

A MTB chain is not O ring and requires cleaning. On an O ring just lube between the plates top and bottom where it hits the rubber rings. I always over lube and make a mess. I use both the Home Depot teflon stuff and Bell Ray Clean Lube which is more $$ but lasts a little longer. I lube at every other tank, but rarely ride in the rain unless it catches me on the highway.
Finally. 100% agree. Cleaning for just street riding is not needed. Lubricate using a teflon motorcycle chain lube. Use a center stand or a rear stand, turning the wheel by hand and spraying the o -ring groove on both outer sides of the chain. Clean off the excess from the chain and surrounding areas. Repeat ea 500 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
@ALL: Thanks! Great tips and information.
The video clip by hamblinc is just what I was looking for better understanding.

I'm a street rider, no off road (so far..), so I will follow your advice, which I can sum up pretty much like this:

A. Regular lube - Every 500 miles:
1. Engine Off, preferably after ride when chain is hot
2. Dry chain with clean cloth/rag.
3. Spray lube on O-Rings from inside of chain circumference (they spread out due to centrifugal forces), one visible chain 'section' at a time.
4. Rotate rear wheel by hand, or move bike bike/forth to reveal next non-lubed chain section.
5. Repeat 3-4 until all chain is lubed.

B. Cleanup - Not as often (Every 1500 miles TBD) or with dirty chain:
1. Engine Off, preferably after ride when chain is hot
2. Spray/apply chain cleaner (WD-40 or Karosene) one visible 'section' at a time
3. Rotate rear wheel by hand, or move bike bike/forth to reveal next non-cleaned chain section.
4. Repeat 2-3 until all chain has cleaner applied to it
5. Allow cleaner to work for some time (5-10 minutes)
6. Thoroughly dry chain with clean cloth/rag and if needed with some brush/chain cleaning tool.
7. Lube chain using same steps A.3-A.5.

C. Advanced cleanup - (Every 5000 miles TBD)
1. Engine Off, preferably after ride when chain is hot
2. Take off chain guard
3. Apply chain cleaner to front & rear sprocket.
4. Clean chain as in Process B
5. Clean & dry sprockets and area around them
6. Lube chain using same steps A.3-A.5.
 

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When people suggest that you clean the chain and tell you how to do it ask them how long their chain has lasted. My last chain, which was never cleaned, lasted almost 45,000 MILES.

My last chain saw lots of street riding, but saw a good amount of gravel roads (both dry and wet) It was ridden in a lot of rain. It was ridden on roads that had lots of salt and salt brine on them.

Never cleaned.

Lubed after every tank of gas and after every rain ride.

Lasted almost 45,000 miles.


..Tom

ps: I used Wurth HHS 2000 but I don't know that that was the reason it lasted as there are many people that use auto chain lubers that get similar or more mileage with simple oil products.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
When people suggest that you clean the chain and tell you how to do it ask them how long their chain has lasted. My last chain, which was never cleaned, lasted almost 45,000 MILES.

My last chain saw lots of street riding, but saw a good amount of gravel roads (both dry and wet) It was ridden in a lot of rain. It was ridden on roads that had lots of salt and salt brine on them.

Never cleaned.

Lubed after every tank of gas and after every rain ride.

Lasted almost 45,000 miles.


..Tom

ps: I used Wurth HHS 2000 but I don't know that that was the reason it lasted as there are many people that use auto chain lubers that get similar or more mileage with simple oil products.
Thanks - Great piece of information from somebody who obviously has proven empirical proof. RESPECT! :)
What you say makes sense - cleaning with a strong chemical can actually cause damage to the O-Rings rubber.
I got the WD-40 but it doesn't mean I have to use it.

That been said - do you really think that using a dry cloth to just wipe out the chain before applying new lube can harm it? It seems like a good way to get rid of old 'black' lube
 

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Oh yeah..........NEVER put the bike on the centerstand, start the motor, put it in gear to get the chain moving, and then try to lube it while in motion..........not unless you want to get the "5 finger discount".
I hear ya, but I do that all the time....one hand on the clutch, one hand on the Dupont [the 5" spray straw helps!]....safety first!
 

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Thanks - Great piece of information from somebody who obviously has proven empirical proof. RESPECT! :)
What you say makes sense - cleaning with a strong chemical can actually cause damage to the O-Rings rubber.
I got the WD-40 but it doesn't mean I have to use it.

That been said - do you really think that using a dry cloth to just wipe out the chain before applying new lube can harm it? It seems like a good way to get rid of old 'black' lube
I don't think it would make any difference one way or another and I did wipe my chain a couple of times when I was checking it. It is purely cosmetic and does nothing to help or harm the life of the chain. I think the use of a brush and cleaning agents to try and get stuff out from between the links hurts the chain in the long run. Apart from stopping rust from forming on the outside of the link the chain lube is only needed in the area between the plates. If you are generous with lube in that area then any little stuff will wash out and some lube will get on the rest of the chain to help stop surface rust.

..Tom
 

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I hear ya, but I do that all the time....one hand on the clutch, one hand on the Dupont [the 5" spray straw helps!]....safety first!
+1 - I use Dupont Teflon Chain Saver spray, bike up on the center stand, start the engine and let it idle. Feather the clutch to allow the rear wheel to turn slowly. The trick is to spray the bottom run of chain where it returns to the countershaft sprocket. Overspray and any dripping is contained by the engine covers. Don't overdo it. And don't bother cleaning.
 

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OK nooby question here... If the O-ring chains are sealed up, what does the lube actually do? Is it to help set it onto the sprockets more smoothly or what?
 

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OK nooby question here... If the O-ring chains are sealed up, what does the lube actually do? Is it to help set it onto the sprockets more smoothly or what?
The only part that needs lube is where the side plates touch. Lube anywhere else does nothing or quickly dissappears. (Okay some oil on the side of the plates helps prevent surface rust.)

..Tom
 

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The lube keeps the O-rings supple, prevents surface rust, lubricates the roller to bushing interface and cushions the roller to sprocket contact. The O-rings only hold lube between the pin and bushing. http://www.stromtrooper.com/472698-post16.html

 
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