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Recently switched from a Google Pixel2 Android to an Iphone. I found the maps worked pretty well on the Android. Today I set out on a ride hoping to take very small roads. The Problem with the Iphone was that the resolution on the small dirt rural roads was pathetic. Couldn't get road names unless I was zoomed in all the way. Back out to get an overvue of where you are and everything went blank. Is there some software I need to download? Not sure if the maps are google maps, but maybe. Perhaps Google provides Apple with a watered down version. Tips appreciated.
 

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Apple just updated its Map app and I can't comment on it since the previous version made your teeth ache to use it.

It is not Google based. There are lots of off grid apps available that let you download a variety of maps - some free - some for pay.
 

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Well I just downloaded Google maps, so that is at least where i was before the switch. More options would be good. I know I saw an app a year or so ago that combined google earth with trails. Forget the name but it looked very impressive.
 

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Take a crack at Furkot for planning but the interface is a bit daunting. It has a wealth of existing tracks.
Where are you in Canada?
 

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Take a crack at Furkot for planning but the interface is a bit daunting. It has a wealth of existing tracks.
Where are you in Canada?
Loved planning in furkot.....now they want $$$ to do so
As for navigation I like osm+
I suck at this stuff so others would know best......
But that's what I use


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Discussion Starter #6
Take a crack at Furkot for planning but the interface is a bit daunting. It has a wealth of existing tracks.
Where are you in Canada?
I live in Toronto. Today was riding North East of Beaverton up to Bracebridge. Took the long route compared to that God Awful Highway 400. Beautiful ride. Started out at 36C in Toronto.
 

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Apple has its own Maps application, that is installed on the iPhone by default. I don't know what the source of that data is. But if you are used to Google Maps on Android, you can always install Google Maps on the iPhone too. it's available in the Apple App Store for free.

Google Maps for Android and Apple are basically the same, although I recently found that a feature that is present in Android, is missing from the Apple version. Can't remember exactly what it was, so it must be insignificant.

Google Maps is great for getting somewhere, but if you want to take backroads, the best it can do is "avoid highways" and that still takes you via major roads.

If I have a route via backroads that I want to ride, I typically use "Google My Maps" on my laptop. Note that this is not the same as Google Maps: Google Maps is generic, while Google My Maps is linked into your Google account, and thus will use Google Drive to store your routes. With Google My Maps you can plan a route from A to B (or via multiple points) and then drag around the route so it uses the backroads you want. You can then export this route to a mapping application on the iPhone.

On my iPhone I use Maps.Me to import the route (usually via Airdrop, but other ways of importing are possible as well). I then use Maps.Me to follow the route. I have also used Scenic in the past but liked it less.

One caveat here: They way Google My Maps exports your planned route is suitable to display on the map in Maps.Me or Scenic, but is not usable for turn-by-turn navigation. So you don't get voice prompts to make a turn, but you'll have to look down on the phone to see which way to go. I don't know of any combination of applications/apps that allows you to rubber band your own route together, and then gives you voice prompts.

Back out to get an overvue of where you are and everything went blank.
All mapping applications perform caching of recently loaded data. But if you zoom out to a resolution that you have not previously used before, it can't show you the data from the cache but needs to download it from the internet. If your internet connection is sketchy or nonexistent, then there's nothing the app can do about that.

In Google Maps you have the option of downloading "Offline Maps" of any area you specify. These will then be used for the display, but I don't think you can do a complete A -> B navigation offline.

In Maps.Me you always need to download the "tile" of the area you are going to ride in. This is done when you enter a tile, or when you plan a route across a tile. Maps.Me uses data from the Openstreetmap Project by the way.
 

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Apple Map provenance
The main provider of map data is TomTom, but data is also supplied by Automotive Navigation Data, Hexagon AB, Intermap Technologies, OpenStreetMap, and Waze. Apple renewed their agreement with TomTom in 2015. TomTom is the parent company of Tele Atlas, which is also used by Apple Maps' competitor, Google Maps.
I like the original TomTom App and still use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Apple has its own Maps application, that is installed on the iPhone by default. I don't know what the source of that data is. But if you are used to Google Maps on Android, you can always install Google Maps on the iPhone too. it's available in the Apple App Store for free.

Google Maps for Android and Apple are basically the same, although I recently found that a feature that is present in Android, is missing from the Apple version. Can't remember exactly what it was, so it must be insignificant.

Google Maps is great for getting somewhere, but if you want to take backroads, the best it can do is "avoid highways" and that still takes you via major roads.

If I have a route via backroads that I want to ride, I typically use "Google My Maps" on my laptop. Note that this is not the same as Google Maps: Google Maps is generic, while Google My Maps is linked into your Google account, and thus will use Google Drive to store your routes. With Google My Maps you can plan a route from A to B (or via multiple points) and then drag around the route so it uses the backroads you want. You can then export this route to a mapping application on the iPhone.

On my iPhone I use Maps.Me to import the route (usually via Airdrop, but other ways of importing are possible as well). I then use Maps.Me to follow the route. I have also used Scenic in the past but liked it less.

One caveat here: They way Google My Maps exports your planned route is suitable to display on the map in Maps.Me or Scenic, but is not usable for turn-by-turn navigation. So you don't get voice prompts to make a turn, but you'll have to look down on the phone to see which way to go. I don't know of any combination of applications/apps that allows you to rubber band your own route together, and then gives you voice prompts.



All mapping applications perform caching of recently loaded data. But if you zoom out to a resolution that you have not previously used before, it can't show you the data from the cache but needs to download it from the internet. If your internet connection is sketchy or nonexistent, then there's nothing the app can do about that.

In Google Maps you have the option of downloading "Offline Maps" of any area you specify. These will then be used for the display, but I don't think you can do a complete A -> B navigation offline.

In Maps.Me you always need to download the "tile" of the area you are going to ride in. This is done when you enter a tile, or when you plan a route across a tile. Maps.Me uses data from the Openstreetmap Project by the way.
Great amount of info thanks. Being a Tech Luddite, It'll take me a while to figure out.
 

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I have and use REVER and SCENIC for the most part. Both will let you plan rides and track a ride to be saved as a 'route' for sharing or re-riding. The terminology differs between them. REVER has a webpage equivalent, so that when logged in, you can plan a ride/ route on the big screen, and then it automatically shows up on your phone app. That is nice. SCENIC is the better navigation app, IMO, esp. with the auto zooming feature. When there are no turns/ decisions to be made, it zooms out (or in?) and then when you need to see more detail, it automatically zooms in. It is adjustable, and works well. SCENIC has no webpage mirror, so you have to plan your route on the phone (which I dislike as it is harder for older eyes) or else you do the planning in Furkot or Kurviger on the big screen.

Both have paid components, but I'm fine with that. Furkot has some nice features, but I find it very annoying to use; too many strange loops and double-backs of routes. I have done route planning on the desktop with REVER, then through some complex process, exported a .gpx file and imported it into SCENIC. That takes a SCENIC credit, which costs... $0.75? Can't remember.

Anyhow, I think both these apps are very good navigating, tracking and planning tools for the iPhone. They have some free functionality but both are worth buying the premium features. Usually some sales during the year as well.
 
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I've heard great things about OSM+ but the last time I checked it wasn't available for iOS (iPhone).

I use Furkot for route planning, then upload the file to Scenic for trip navigation. I too have experienced the unplanned loops and turnarounds, so I have to always check the route once it's loaded to massage out the kinks.

For day-to-day navigation, I use the Google Maps app downloaded to my iPhone. Over the last couple of years I've noticed Google Maps has upped their game with the off-road trails. It's still not perfect, but pretty good.
 
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TomTom has a iPhone app that I use. It is not free. It has a ton of features, plays nicely with other iPhone apps. It has onboard (downloaded) maps of the whole USA. Does not use cellular towers. It even has a "Get Help" button.
 
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Watching and going over your input on apps.
Would love to cut down devices on my bike, spot tracker, Garmin Zumo and iPhone.
My big concern out here in the Desert Southwest is my phone constantly shuts down because of getting too hot.
Even worse if I plug in to charge.
Have any of you encountered this while running the Navi apps?
Mike


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My big concern out here in the Desert Southwest is my phone constantly shuts down because of getting too hot.
Even worse if I plug in to charge.
Having the glass lens in direct sunlight doesn't help. But the real heat culprit is the battery. More often than not, the usb plug is under spec'd and poor quality. There is a construction difference between a $3 and a $18 usb plug. For the same reasons a too small wire heats up ... Also, as you may already know, if you have a dual port adapter the amps get cut in half. All this gets aggravated when any application is demanding that the computer in your phone has to constantly update the data. You need the data so consider the power conduit. Here is a random article that compares plugs: Best usb Chargers
 
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I’m not sure if running an actual Apple brand cord or not, but charger block is definitely a cheapy as mine all seem to disappear when my kids or grandkids come around.
I took case off phone which helps it breath some, but even in my top case out of sun with zipper cracked a bit for air flow it’s in thermal shutdown when 110+.
Buddy’s gold wing was showing 124 while riding the other day.
I know that’s a little high, but it’s still what we call a 100 & stupid
Mike


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