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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I went to tighten my chain tonight because things felt a bit sloppy on the ride home. Then I noticed this:










I'm not the most diligent at maintenance but I'm certainly not the worst. I don't check the sprocket a lot but I don't ignore it. I haven't noticed any degradation before, this came about fairly rapidly.

The front sprocket is fine and the chain looks ok too. What could cause something like this? Should I not ride it until I get a replacement? I'd only be riding about 15 miles daily on city streets to work.

I replaced the original chain and sprockets at 20,900 miles with a set from Blair. This set is currently 5 miles short of 10,000 miles.

Where are people buying sprockets these days?
 

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I wouldn't ride it.. it sure looks like it could skip quite easily and may have already.

I suspect your chain was loose enough that the chain was jumping over some of the teeth and that action stripped things. To my untrained eye your chain area looks way too clean and dry.

..Tom
 

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Worn chain sprocket

That is a worn out sprocket. Due either to poor quality metal sprocket, lack of lubrication, or too much dirt and sand.
Becareful out there:mod2_scooter:
 

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I agree with Tom.

Unless you are a demon chain-and-sprocket cleaner,
your chain has needed lubrication for a long time.

I spray my chain liberally (but not generously) every 500 miles,
and clean it with kerosene every 5000 miles or so, or just before
a long trip. You can find lots of info on chain maintenance here.

And no, do not ride an inch until you get a new rear sprocket.

I cannot understand how your chain and front sprocket can be OK
when there is such catastrophic damage to the rear sprocket.
Please get a pro to examine those components before riding.

My first chain and sprockets lasted 22000 miles, and so did my second.
With my third chain and third front sprocket, I re-used a rear sprocket,
but that rear sprocket is mounted backward, with five washers to
align it properly with the front sprocket. All is well, and I definitely do
not see any increased chain wear or any other symptoms of trouble.
I have run 18000 miles this way, and the chain will likely last another
four thousand miles, then it will be time for another front sprocket,
another chain, and reverse mounting of the original rear sprocket.

I get my sprockets from my friendly local Suzuki Dealer, here in Sarasota.
I buy chain lubricant from any bike shop, most recently from a Harley store.

By the way, if your handle means you are a Canadian, you are not alone.
So am I.

Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I had lubed the chain the night before last, I lube the top and bottom so the side might look dry. And it needed a cleaning but it wasn't too bad. I don't let it get that dry/dirty. Don't make me out to be someone who doesn't maintain his bike.

I took the bike to my mechanic a week ago because I was having problems getting new rear brake pads to work. He had the bike on a rear stand to spin the wheel and took it for a test drive and didn't notice anything out of the ordinary.
 

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Replace that sprocket with one made from steel.
Grab you owners manual and find the section on measuring your chain for wear, then measure your chain.

I'd bet that your chain is out of spec.
Replace the chain and both sprockets--don't go for the BS about an aluminum sprocket being better than steel. You are not racing your bike (so the weight difference shouldn't be a major factor) and need these parts to last.
I've been told something like:
The aluminum sprocket is coated with some stuff that is harder than steel, it will be fine, this is what the racers all use...

Don't believe that line of crap for a second.










.
 

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Where did the lubrication go?

I'm sorry if you feel offended by my opinion, thecdn.
I see no trace of lubrication in your photographs,
and the rear sprocket is a total disaster.

If you replace the sprocket only, you may see accelerated wear of the old front sprocket, old chain, and new rear sprocket. The principal reason for this is that wear increases the length of a chain, and widens the gaps between a sprocket's teeth. For a while, the old chain will not precisely fit the new sprocket.

I stand on this opinion, though: a proper chain, given proper chain tension and
proper chain lubrication will not cause the symptoms your rear sprocket exhibits.

Good luck with your repairs.
Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm sorry if you feel offended by my opinion, thecdn.
Not offended, just wanted to correct the notion that I didn't lube the chain in a reasonable manner. Might occasionally go longer than I should between lubes, but not that much and not regularly.

Will be calling Competition to see what they have tomorrow morning and will measure the chain.
 

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The suzuki oem rear sprocket should easily last through 2 chains and 3 front sprockets if properly aligned, tensioned, and lubed.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just measured the chain and it falls within the specs of the manual. My son and I both gave it a good look and it seems fine and as I mentioned the front sprocket looks great.

Will be replacing the rear sprocket soonest with a steel one then will take the bike to my mechanic for a more professional opinion.
 

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I suspect V-Tom is correct the chain was too loose as you sensed and may have been skipping. I also agree it may have been a aluminum sprocket. The front wears about twice as fast I have found. I agree with the others check it. If it was my bike I would replace both F&B sprockets and chain. I replace all three when I do. It costs a bit but averaged over 15 to 20k it is a safe bet I won't have issues.
 

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sprocket

Sorry to here about your troubles but it for sure is a complete lack of mantainence and lubrication that has caused this problem..Period.. and if your Mechanic took your bike for a ride with that sprocket on your bike ... Well I`d be looking for a new Mech ... ASAP... Replace frt and rear and chain and start fresh and when you do your llubing of your chain make sure you lube the snott out of it .and the best time is just after returning from a short ride as the chain is warm and lube will soak into it better .. oh! and I am sorry in advance if I sound little Harsh..
 

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Unless you are a demon chain-and-sprocket cleaner,
your chain has needed lubrication for a long time.

I spray my chain liberally (but not generously) every 500 miles,
and clean it with kerosene every 5000 miles or so, or just before
a long trip. You can find lots of info on chain maintenance here.
...
I suspect that something beyond lubing the chain is at work here.

Having said that, I lube my chain with every tank of fuel and after every ride in the rain. This means the chain gets lube at least every 250 to 350 miles. This chain has NEVER been cleaned and I am running the same front and rear sprocket that I put on with this chain. They currently have over 45,000 MILES on them and the chain was was never adjusted until about 5,000 or 6,000 miles ago, and then only as part of an alignment of the rear axle after a crash.

If you want your chain to last a long time forget about cleaning it but lube it much more often than is the common wisdom.

..Tom
 

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I know in an ealrier post that you said that you'd measured the chain and it was within specs, but something is worng!

There is a chance that the chain is stretched over a few teeth only, and where you measured it, it is fine.

When a chain "stretches" the pin to pin length is bigger. So when the chain is working it will be in the right position for the teeth on top of the sprocket, but at the bottom will be putting a huge force on the teeth and break them off.

This always happens on the rear sprocket first, as there are more teeth and the difference over 20 teeth is much more than over 7.

Stick it on the stand / block of wood so that you can rotate the back wheel and watch whats happening.

My guess is that its the chain, not the adjustment.

In that case you'll need to replace both sprockets and the chain.
 

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The rear sprocket is shot (obviously) and that simply did not happen on one ride or magically overnight while the bike was parked in the garage.
Despite the OP's protestations there is a lack of owner maintenance and surveillance of the bike here. A sprocket in that condition was visually worn months ago and should have been noticed by any owner who performs even a cursory inspection of their bike well before it got to the stage of breaking teeth.
I don't know what the actual cause is and won't speculate on it but the owner is seriously at fault for not picking the problem up sooner.

For anybody who doesn't check their bike regularly take this thread as a warning to start doing a proper pre and post ride inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Despite the OP's protestations there is a lack of owner maintenance and surveillance of the bike here. A sprocket in that condition was visually worn months ago and should have been noticed by any owner who performs even a cursory inspection of their bike well before it got to the stage of breaking teeth.
I don't know what the actual cause is and won't speculate on it but the owner is seriously at fault for not picking the problem up sooner.
F U and the other sanctimonious pricks here who have no idea who I am and how I look after my bike.

For anybody who doesn't check their bike regularly take this thread as a warning to start doing a proper pre and post ride inspection.
Take this thread as a warning that you can come here looking for some input as to what happened to your bike and the great gurus of the site will assume you are a lazy moron who doesn't know what a can of chain lube is used for.
 

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F U and the other sanctimonious pricks here who have no idea who I am and how I look after my bike.



Take this thread as a warning that you can come here looking for some input as to what happened to your bike and the great gurus of the site will assume you are a lazy moron who doesn't know what a can of chain lube is used for.
Hey thecdn
Yes, there seems to be a lot of "pack mentality" going on here.... There are some people who only feel good about themselves when they put others down. People have made some huge assumptions about what happened to your sprocket... I tend agree with V-Tom.... I am not suggesting anything is amiss with Blair himself and the products he sells, but maybe the set you bought (not sure if you bought just the chain or sprokets too) had some quality issues going on right from the manufacturer? I would just get myself a new sprocket(s) and chain and keep an eye on things... I would have no issues buying a new set from Blair... In fact maybe if you contact him he may be able to help you out a bit?
 

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Aluminum has other uses.

If the sprocket is aluminum, then I think it is the culprit.

I believe an aluminum sprocket can work very well for a considerable distance, then suddenly be overwhelmed when the chain wears a critical additional micron, at which point the loss of one sprocket tooth brings added stress to both adjacent teeth, which soon fail, then even greater stress to both teeth adjacent to the three-tooth gap, etc.

So it could look OK in Fort Lauderdale, and be utter trash by Palm Beach.

I had no idea that sprockets were made of anything but steel
(or perhaps titanium for those with unlimited budgets).

This is surely a lesson for me. Nothing but steel, please.

The culprit is the ignorant merchant who sold the Original Poster a doomed sprocket,
and thecdn is clearly the victim in this saga. No wonder he has attracted so much blame! :mrgreen:
 

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Replace that sprocket with one made from steel.

.
Hank, Aside from the atrocious wear, what makes you think it's an aluminum sprocket? That was my first thought when I saw the pictures.



I don't mean to pick on your photographic skills, CDN, but I can't see how anyone can conduct any kind of maintenance forensics of that chain/sprocket set from those poorly lit, out-of-focus pictures.

If CDN says he cleans and lubes his chain with some degree of regularity, I wouldn't second-guess him. If this catastophic failure of unknown origin makes some forum members feel justified for their obsessive attention to chain maintenance: bully for you.
 
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