StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i have been gettin bolder and bolder as i improve my skills but i dont really wanna scrape.....so how far of a lean does it take? do any of you fellas or ladies scrape very often?

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Personally for me, I don't do it often beacuse I don't trust the crappy roads around here, but I know that my Pilot Road 3s will take me all the way to scraping peg feelers.

Usually you are good to go for getting to the peg feelers. If you have a centerstand, sometimes it will scrape first going to the left (or so I have heard, I don't have a centrerstand). Keep your toes up by keeping the balls of your feet on the pegs, otherwise your toes will scrape first and that is a very unnerving feeling. Otherwise, you will hear the scrape of thr peg feeler and that is your warning to knock it off.

Basically the only thing stopping it is you. Be safe and keep the rubber side down!:thumbup:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,397 Posts
Just because you may scrape, does not necessarily mean you are riding faster or more aggressively than if you do not scrape. I do not scrape pegs, but feel I ride plenty fast and aggressive "it is about being smooth and with the proper technique".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
An unexpected dip in a hard corner when you have a passenger may be your first scrape, unless you plan for it....which is preferable, because you are more likely to respond best when you aren't jolted by the surprise.

Find a corner you can see through (for safety reasons), and practice leaning more and more. You don't have to go faster and faster to lean more and more.

Besides, leaning more isn't necessarily faster, as good riders only lean the bike as much as is required to make the turn (they keep the bike as upright as the speed/radius requires). But, to get used to the feeling of scraping, simply leaning more is one way to feel it. Once you get comfortable feeling the scrape, go through that same turn faster and faster, while avoiding the scraping. (You'll have to either observe or study someone doing it correctly if you don't understand what I mean by leaning only as much as the speed/radius requires.) Then, if you scrape while really going fast through a corner, your slower-speed-scraping exercise can help you stay relaxed when you happen to scrape on a higher speed turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Just because you may scrape, does not necessarily mean you are riding faster or more aggressively than if you do not scrape. I do not scrape pegs, but feel I ride plenty fast and aggressive "it is about being smooth and with the proper technique".
This is good. I don't usually scrape either but I am keeping up with my buddies who are scraping. If you are staying seated in the middle of the seat you will have to lean more. I am a previous sport bike rider so I tend to shift my seating position with my butt half on/off the seat and lean my body in. Doing this will get you into a corner just as fast without having to lean the bike as far.

But like Big B said, sometimes someone can ride faster and moreaggressive without scraping than someone who does. There is more than just scraping....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Hmm,,, It is nice to have the "bragging rights" to say that you're able to scrape your pegs, BUT, that takes a helluva lot of lean angle and on public roads you're flirting with disaster.

"True Story:" A few years ago my buddy was checking out my old EX500. He's a Harley guy. So he looked at my footpeg feelers and said, "What are these for?" I told him that they were designed to scrape before anything else, to indicate that you were about at the limit of traction. After a brief inspection, he remarked, "Hm, there's not a single mark on them." :green_lol:

Last week my girlfriend and I rode all through southeast Ohio, with our "base" in Marietta. We also hit some spots in West Virginia, right across the river. WOW, those roads are awesome! 26, 555, 565, 537, 255, 260; the list goes on and on and I definitely plan on going back again! Anyway, riding two-up with her for the whole trip, we did scrape her pegs a few times, first time ever for me, and quite startling for her. That wouldn't have happened but for the increased weight, causing the back of the bike to sit lower, and the Dan Vessel replacement/peg-lowering brackets that I put on for her. Riding solo and with stock pegs, it would've taken quite a bit more lean I think, not something I would want to push out there. The surrounding scenery would be quite unforgiving in a crash, and help would be a looong way away.

If that's what you really want to do, hey, it never hurts to become more familiar with your bike's handling, and gain the useful experience. Just do it when and where it's safe! If you consistently push the envelope on public roads, it's just a matter of time before you exceed your limits. Here's something I've been interested in myself, that I saw somewhere else. Looks like fun and would definitely improve one's skills!

Gymkhana - ADVrider
 

·
Official Stromtrooper.com Sponsor
Joined
·
5,424 Posts
i have been gettin bolder and bolder as i improve my skills but i dont really wanna scrape.....so how far of a lean does it take? do any of you fellas or ladies scrape very often?

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
Both peg feelers on my 2012 650 have scrape marks. I have the Richland Ricks peg lowering kit on it, but that really doesn't cause them to scrape much sooner than the stock setting ( at lean angle the amount lowered doesn't change the actual height of the peg from the road as much as you might think ).

Riding style has more to do with peg dragging than simple speed. I lean to the inside of the turn, not scooting my butt off the seat, and keep my head pointed in the direction I want to go. If you drag the pegs while doing that, you are pushing pretty hard. If you let the bike lean and try to stay upright, the pegs will drag easily.

Suspension settings have a big effect on peg dragging. This is where the aftermarket springs can have a huge advantage as they don't compress near as much in the turns and give a lot more clearance.

Find a nice empty parking lot. Ride in circles and practice a good riding style for steep lean angles. Get comfortable doing that and don't necessarily try to drag the pegs. Most are surprised at just how far over the bike is leaning when the pegs touch and are not comfortable with it. Get more used to the steep angles and you will be more in control when pushing your limits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
Scraping the pegs is real easy--just lean the wrong way in a brisk turn. If you keep your body upright while the bike leans...you lean away from the direction of the curve...they'll scrape. Do it more and you'll scrape hard parts on the bike. This takes weight off the tires and makes it more likely to skid.

Lean the right way, lean toward the pavement to the inside of the turn, and you'll rarely scrape the pegs. You need to get your body's center of mass, usually in the chest area, to the inside of the bike's center line. The farther your body is inside the more clearance you'll have under your inside peg. And, the more upright you keep your bike the better it will handle, scraping or not.

Often a rider will scrape their boots before they scrape the pegs. Many riders put the arch of their foot on the pegs and let their toes point out to the sides. It is better to put the ball of your foot on the pegs (you'll have better feel of the bike as well) and keep your feet straight ahead, and you'll scrape your boots much less.

DON'T FLINCH if you scrape the pegs. DON'T CHOP THE THROTTLE. DON'T BRAKE. DON'T DO ANYTHING ABRUPTLY. Braking or chopping off the throttle causes the bike to drop farther into the turn. Do smoothly roll on a bit of throttle to start to stand the bike up if there is room in the curve. Do pull back slightly on the inside grip to start to stand the bike up if there is room in the curve. And, if there isn't room in the curve, keep on riding, roll the throttle open, and ride to your planned exit of the curve.

Your tires have more traction than you expect. Even on wet clean pavement, your tires have good traction even when you scrape the pegs unless you do something dumb like brake or chop the throttle.

Start the turn wide. Turn your head to look all the way to the turn exit. Go deep & wide into the turn. Brake as you enter; downshift as needed for the exit. Turn sharpest when you're going slowest deep and wide in the curve. Roll on the throttle as you straighten and exit. Come closest to the inside of the curve at about the 2/3rds point through the turn (called the late apex) where you're already accelerating. The deep & wide turn-in gives you the best sight line of your turn exit, and you can plan the exit to avoid road hazards or the best entry to the next turn. Don't let your body cross the center line on a left turn. Give on-coming drivers a chance to miss you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
P.S. ToddStrom: Maybe I'm wrong but it sounds like you're new to riding... Please don't report to us later that you've trashed the new Strom! :yikes: It's nice having a brand new bike and all, but for learning purposes you might've been better off buying something more expendable, like a used 250 Ninja or something. If you wreck that, who cares! (As long as you or anyone else doesn't get hurt, that is.) Or at the very least, invest in some sturdy crash bars! Good luck. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Hmm,,, It is nice to have the "bragging rights" to say that you're able to scrape your pegs, BUT, that takes a helluva lot of lean angle and on public roads you're flirting with disaster.
Yep... all it takes is a little oil, diesel, dirt, gravel (all common on public roads) to quickly change things from scraping pegs to your whole bike scraping and your skin being scraped to the bone! :yikes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
thanks guys for lots of info fast! its as i thought....pretty rare to scrape on a wee.....and dont worry i am pushin it about as far as i want now and i have been ridin for awhile....started on cbr250 abs....wonderful little bike btw......thanks i think i am far from scrapin and happy with how far i push it now.....was just wonderin

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
p.s. wee is much nimbler than it looks.....i have left my friend behind a few times on the backroads and he rides a 2009 cbr600rr.....between the nimbleness and bump eating suspension the wee is fantastic on rough back roads

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
Very easy to scrape pegs on the 2012 compared to my '07 or '05.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
715 Posts
Very easy to scrape pegs on the 2012 compared to my '07 or '05.
My aftermarket center stand ('09 Wee) came with a longer replacement left peg feeler, and I scrape that pretty frequently. The right side gets an occasional hit also. It generally happens when a corner is not quite what I expected - like off-camber.

I do recommend practicing it in a controlled environment, so you're not taken by surprise on the road. You won't go down unless you do something dumb, or there's gravel or something in the turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
If you are staying seated in the middle of the seat you will have to lean more. I am a previous sport bike rider so I tend to shift my seating position with my butt half on/off the seat and lean my body in. Doing this will get you into a corner just as fast without having to lean the bike as far.
This is correct. Basically it comes down to this. The faster you corner, the lower the combined center of gravity (of you and the bike) needs to be.

If you sit upright and are cornering at a speed where your combined center of gravity is 45 degrees, then you and the bike will be leaned at 45 degrees.

If you lean off the bike at the same speed, then maybe you'll be leaning your body to 50 degrees (from vertical) but the bike might only be at 42 degrees. So by doing this your using the fatter part of the tyres and less chance of peg scraping.

Watch any road bike race, they sit with one bum cheek off the seat and lean a long way off the side.

If you want to learn how to corner, do a trackday. I do them on my DRZ and have to lean off a lot to stop the pegs scraping. My Vstrom scrapes a lot easier than my DRZ. After a trackday I hop on the Vstrom and scrape the pegs a lot until I recalibrate my brain to how far I need to lean off it to stop it happening.



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
I usually keep my feet in the forward position and my left boot has touched the pavement a few times The first time it touched was on the Dragon. I shortened the feelers by one inch to compensate for the RR per lowering kit and they haven't hit. When my boot touches that's about as far as I want to go. The rear Battle Wing is at it's limits however the PR 3 on the front is begging to be pushed harder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
It's easy to scrape the pegs on a Strom - just keep your butt planted in the seat and carry enough corner speed :yesnod:

I don't get it, when some people see scraping the pegs as a goal :confused:

I've used my Strom for track days where scraping the pegs would be easy if that was what I wanted - but on track I'm looking for corner speed not lean angle, so I move around on the bike to keep it as upright as possible in the corners.

On the street I normally keep my butt planted in the seat through corners, as it keeps me from getting too close to the edge while riding public roads. The result is that I sometimes scrape the pegs (especially in tight corners and roundabouts) when riding on the road - for me it's a signal that I shouldn't go much faster.

One thing that I take from the track to the street is the position of my feet on the pegs - on straight roads, soft corners and when I'm cruising I don't give much thought about how my feet are placed on the pegs, but when riding a bit spirited I place the pegs under the ball of my feet to make sure, that the pegs hit the ground before my boots. The feelers are cheaper to replace than a good pair of motorcycle boots, and if you are unlucky it can be a bad thing to have a boot trapped between a moving bike and the tarmac.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top