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Discussion Starter #1
Recently my bike has started "wallowing" in high-g cornering. Meaning, I'm cornering hard, and there's a point where the bike seems to start moving side-to-side. It "feels" like it's coming from the back, but not necessarily. It isn't a "tank slapper" as the bars seem to move only an inch or two, in response to what the bike is doing. This also happens in a straight line when approaching triple digit speeds...specifically, above 95mph.

This is only a recent development; previous to it starting I could go to redline in 6th and it was solid and stright; I could corner until my curb feelers touched down, and it was solid and never wiggled.

A couple things have changed on the bike before this started happening: Steering head bearings swapped for tapered roller bearings, bald shinko 805 rear replaced with new shinko 805 rear. (The whole "bent rim" saga happened way after the wallowing started.) After the wallowing started I have adjusted the tension on the steering head bearings - both looser and tighter - and that hasn't changed the wallowing at all.

(Interestingly, the wallowing didn't start as soon as the above changes were made; it was a month or so after the changes before the wallowing started. )

I also noticed some time in that area that the rebound "clicker" screw in my rear shock doesn't work; it just spins forever in both directions.

I'm kinda stumped, so I'm open to suggestions!

I'll be getting a new set of tires soon (as my "new" 805 rear is now bald after 4k miles), so it'll be interesting to see if that helps.
 

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Check whether each fork tube is set up alike.
 

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Long spindly forks also have a tendency to flex . Fork braces go a long way in providing extra support and tying the forks together.

But if this is a new thing you are experiencing then start at the tires then move onto the suspension. Also check the rear wheel for alignment and or worn bearings allowing play side to side.
 

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Worn out shock is the most common culprit, by far. Worn wheel or swingarm bearing can also be part of it.
Forks can contribute too, mostly lack of rebound damping, but given that you've just put in new springs and oil up there that won't be the problem in your case.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I wonder if it happened when the rebound adjuster broke in the rear shock. Hmmm...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Rear shock has about 30k miles. I have another rear with 65k miles on it, but the rebound adjuster works. Maybe I'll throw that on there and see how it goes.

I wonder if it would be worth it to swap the springs; I'm guessing at 65k the OEM spring is probably shot. (Of course they are too soft from the factory, especially for my kind of riding, so the 30k spring may be just as bad off by now.)
 

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Apart from tyres and steering stem bearings which have been attended to, my first thoughts were about the shock. In such a situation I would tend to increase the spring preload some, but I would also up the rebound damping a couple of clicks. The damping may be the main culprit but also if there isn't enough spring preload then the shock might also be squatting under the affect of high G corners. I am aware that Your rebound clicker is useless so perhaps remount the old shock.

Perhaps also the forks might have become a bit sloppy due to worn bushings and a refresh kit might be on the cards or a heavier fork oil. However as I say my first port of call would be the shock.
 

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Rear shock has about 30k miles. I have another rear with 65k miles on it, but the rebound adjuster works. Maybe I'll throw that on there and see how it goes.

I wonder if it would be worth it to swap the springs; I'm guessing at 65k the OEM spring is probably shot. (Of course they are too soft from the factory, especially for my kind of riding, so the 30k spring may be just as bad off by now.)
Springs don't really wear out, at least not if they're made of the proper alloy. But you're correct that they are much too soft to start with.
Your problem though (at least this problem, you seem to have many :)) is damping related. A stiffer spring by itself won't help and may make things worse.

I'd highly recommend sending the shock off to Jamie Daugherty to get resprung and revalved.
 
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Rear shock has about 30k miles. I have another rear with 65k miles on it, but the rebound adjuster works. Maybe I'll throw that on there and see how it goes.
My OEM shock was toast at 30K miles. I doubt that having functional pre-load will make a huge difference in the wallow that you're experiencing.
Get that shock rebuilt or better yet, spring for a quality aftermarket unit with the correct spring rate. OEM spring rates--front and back--are notoriously soft!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When I broke my bike a couple years ago, and then caught it on fire, the fire melted the preload adjuster hose on my rear shock. I got an OEM shock with (IIRC) 25k miles on it from a really nice guy here, and that's the one I've been using. Yesterday after work I examined my original shock, and I couldn't believe it...the fire had only melted the hard outer coating of the preload adjuster hose; the hose itself is completely fine! That shock has 65k miles on it, but the rebound adjuster works, so I swapped shocks last night. I'll be heading out at lunchtime today to see if that has fixed the wallowing.

Interesting note; I found when I took the newer shock off the bike that not only was the rebound adjuster broken (just spins forever in either direction), but the "bump stop" inside the spring is completely gone!! The adjuster was working and the bumpstop was there when I got the shock and installed it. :) I also found that the 2 larger bolts that hold the centerstand bracket were backed out...like, 1/8" worth of threads showing...and one of the small ones on the right side is completely gone! Yeah; I really need an XR650L. :)

And yes, I really need to get a rebuilt rear shock. I will do that someday! I know the benefits from having previous bikes with rebuilt or aftermarket shocks; night/day difference.
 

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A couple things have changed on the bike before this started happening: Steering head bearings swapped for tapered roller bearings
I have had this happen a couple of time after installing tapered head bearings. Sometimes the bearing races don't get seated all they way and after some riding they finally get seated and then the bearings need to be re-torqued. Easy to do.
 
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