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Discussion Starter #1
Read a lot on here about tires but my application seems a bit different.

I ride very often but not a lot of long trips other than when I commute during the hot days of the year. I’m in northwest PA and other than summer, I have to deal with a lot of mud. Sticky mud and clay. I probably try to ride through more muddy and rutted trails than most vstrom owners.

Also, muddy ruts that are hard to climb out of.

Based on my research I think the anakee wild would work as good as anything for the mud. I also considered the tkc80 and Shinko 804/805 tires. But I think the anakees look like they would do best in the mud. I was convinced the shinkos would be great but the rear looks like it has very little grip side to side.

If I only get a few thousand miles out of a tire I won’t be mad if it grips good enough off road.

So for absolute best off road, wet muddy conditions, what would the best choice be?


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Dunlop 606s.

They go exactly where they are pointed



Was a revelation on my KLR650
 
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I have a dirt rider friend that has tried the "Wild". He went back to his normal TKC 80, said they hold up longer and are better in the dirt. He is a hard rider to keep up with too.

Personally, I would pick a different bike for mud.
 

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The rear 805 is great as a paddle tire in mud but it does like to slide a bit which can be fun or give you some skid marks. Other than darkside its the only rear I run anymore for the money. I'm getting about 5k out of mine and its 85% asphalt usage.
 

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I would never intentionally put a 500 pound bike in the mud without traction control. And a 500 pound bike with traction control and mild off pavement ability is way to expensive to let get beat to crap in the mud.

IMHO, it might be less expensive and certainly more fun to buy a second pre-owned bike more suitable to the mission.

But occasional moist dirt should not be a problem at all. Slick mud is too much for me on a Strom. Heck, dew covered grass growing in clay soil causes my bike to engage traction control. It has saved me from embarrassment in my own front yard several times.
 

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Shinko big blocks or Mitas E07.......but I agree this is overall the wrong machine for conditions like that with any tire.
 
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yup but if you are determined the 606s will do the job

big step up off pavement from the mitas - can't commment on the big block
 
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Discussion Starter #9
To all those telling me not to ride the bike in mud - yes I know. It’s not a dirt bike. This is my only bike for now. I can’t ride a dirt bike for my 100 mile commute that I use the bike for occasionally. I’ve owned lots of other bikes and I love the strom. On most days I ride I’ll see a few miles of pavement, a few miles of gravel, and then a mile or two of trail or field where I can run into a spot or two of mud. I don’t want to run in mud all the time. It just happens. The bike gets used in all conditions and in the fall when the leaves are down they hide the mud sometimes. I’m willing to live with tires that only last 3000 miles if they bite a bit better in the mud.

Also, do I NEED to raise the front fender to run a knobby front tire?


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"Also, do I NEED to raise the front fender to run a knobby front tire?"

Not if it's loose and sloppy, the heavy clay stuff that builds up yes.

TKC-80's were the best but I hated them on road, K60's were adequate on the clay based roads around here even when it was wet. Didn't have the grip the TKC-80's did in mud, but worked well enough and didn't give me the grief TKC-80's did on seal. Most of my riding was on seal, only about 10% dirt.
 

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I agree that Big Blocks or E-07's will handle the occasional mud hole and still ride decent on the asphalt.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"Also, do I NEED to raise the front fender to run a knobby front tire?"



Not if it's loose and sloppy, the heavy clay stuff that builds up yes.



TKC-80's were the best but I hated them on road, K60's were adequate on the clay based roads around here even when it was wet. Didn't have the grip the TKC-80's did in mud, but worked well enough and didn't give me the grief TKC-80's did on seal. Most of my riding was on seal, only about 10% dirt.[/

So what problems on road did the tkc80’s give you on the road? Noise, low grip? Funny handling?


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first I think we have to clarify "mud"

there's the clay mud, hard as a brick, and like riding on pavement when it's dry, soon as it gets damp, the surface starts getting greasy, before you know it, it's like trying to ride in petroleum jelly on ice, not necessarily deep, but slicker than baby sh!t

this type you need a tire that bites into the harder surface below + evacuates the tread

then there's northern New England mud season mud, when the frost melts on the surface, but still plenty frozen 2-3 feet below the surface to prevent melt water from draining, good ole up to yer axles in gravelly sandy loamy glacial till mud

for this type of mud, floatation is key, going to the darkside is one option

then there's mud in between
 

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To all those telling me not to ride the bike in mud - yes I know. It’s not a dirt bike. This is my only bike for now. I can’t ride a dirt bike for my 100 mile commute that I use the bike for occasionally. I’ve owned lots of other bikes and I love the strom. On most days I ride I’ll see a few miles of pavement, a few miles of gravel, and then a mile or two of trail or field where I can run into a spot or two of mud. I don’t want to run in mud all the time. It just happens. The bike gets used in all conditions and in the fall when the leaves are down they hide the mud sometimes. I’m willing to live with tires that only last 3000 miles if they bite a bit better in the mud.

Also, do I NEED to raise the front fender to run a knobby front tire?


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So what worked out for you? I'm over here in north east PA looking for similar.
 

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Dunlop 606s.

They go exactly where they are pointed



Was a revelation on my KLR650
Are these made in VStrom sizes?
 

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Anakee Wilds are pretty much knobby tires. There will be problems with the front fender I think as these tires will grab a lot of mud. Other tires mentioned here are really good all around tires. But I suspect they will fall short in slick, gooey mud.

That said, be VERY careful on pavement with these tires. They will be borderline dangerous on wet pavement!

TKC 80's, Shinko 804/805's, Metas and some like these are competent on pavement and might be a safer choice.

It hurts less to drop the bike in mud than on pavement.......
 

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When my tires need to be changed next time.

I've heard a combo of TKC80s in front and Mitas E07 in the rear will be a good combination.
 

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I have been running E07s this season and they have been good so far. I haven't yet felt they were lacking at all.
I have a set of TKC80s on deck for when these are finished, only because I got a good deal on them otherwise I would probably stick with the E07s.
 
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