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Discussion Starter #1
Well, my wee took it's first nap. Took it off the side stand while still in the garage, it tipped a bit to the right, lost my footing and couldn't get my right leg out far enough for various reasons and down it went on its right side, right up against the wall of the garage. No damage to the bike but I collected a few lumps and bruises. I always thought that ATGATT only applied to riding. Now I see it should apply any time you touch the bike...

Problem was, how do you get a bike back on its feet when there is no room for the standard technique? Impossible to get to the side of the bike it had fallen on because the wall was in the way. Impossible to pick up from the other side because I'm not a 300lb olympic weightlifter.

Is there a solo recovery technique for this situation, other than solo use of a cell phone to call for assistance?

I got it upright myself with the aid of a small winch (!), but that's not likely to be a lot of help if it ever does something similar away from home since there's unlikely to be anything to anchor the winch to, plus I'm not likely to be carrying a winch.
 

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It also isn't likely to have a garage wall in the way of lifting from the side it is laying on. Several techniques are available, many with You Tube vids. Google is your friend, find one that will work for you. It's like throwing hay bales, more technique than strength. Some riders pack a couple of small pulleys and a length of rope to aid in recovery of bikes that are off the road in the weeds.
 

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Having been in that boat myself, with both a bad knee and shoulder, I have had to find a way that works for me.

1. I keep a supply of relatively short velcro straps in the topbox, and use one to lock the brake lever.

2. I keep an overlong wide belt in the top box also. I wrap the belt around one of the givi crash bars or the handle bars support and the other end around my arm and start lifting. Makes picking up the bike a lot easier.

Hope that helps.
 

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My " all else fails" is to walk it up. I get on its side and hold on and walk ( shove, push until it is upright.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
While my garage wall won't be in the way next time (or maybe it will...) I can see similar situations where the bike might take a nap next to a car, or a wall of some sort, or maybe fall againt a hedge or even a tree.

The small pulley idea has mertit, since that's effectively what I did with the winch, but of course it requires an anchor, and one that's some distance off the ground so that at least some component of the pulling force is upwards. The short straps also sound like a good idea. Rather than a pulley, there are some pretty sturdy ratcheting tie down straps which don't weigh a lot and which have minumum breaking strength of several thousand lbs.


I'll take a look on Google and YouTube, but most of the videos demonstate the stock technique of backing up the bike on the side it's fallen on. Getting your butt against the seat, holding the bars and grab rail and walking it upright using your legs as the main lifting force. That's great, assuming you can get to the correct side of the bike.

You could use a gin pole, but carrying around an 8ft length of 2x4 isn't going to be very convenient either! It might be possible to utilze a bumper jack, but again it's not something I really want to carry on a bike since they tend to be long (4-6ft) and pretty heavy.

I wonder if they make one with a 500lb lifting capacity rather than several tons? At least it would be lighter and maybe break down into sections?

I know some cars come with really lightweight (2lbs or so) scissor jacks. They have limited lifting height (maybe from 4" min to 16" max), but I wonder if there is a clever way of using such a jack to help get a fallen bike upright?
 

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In off-road situations, a good technique is to grab one wheel and drag (partially pivoting) the bike until you can get on the correct (or uphill) side. If you slid the bike away from that wall a bit, you could have used the wall to help stand it back up. It sounds like you did fine with the wench though.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
In this case it wasn't possible to turn the bike around. It as actually slightly leaning on the wall. Pretty much jammed in there.

The winch was fine, but it was an unusual situation where there was a convenient high anchor point I could use.

When (many years ago) I did some 4x4 off roading, there were inflatable jacks which could be used to jack up a vehicle on mud. Basically a strong inflatable sack. It would compress down to pretty much zero thickness, then when you pumped air into it it would inflate and lift the vehicle. I wonder if something like that might assist in righting a bike. The ones I saw were inflated by the vehicle exhaust, but I presume you could inflate them using a 12v compressor or even a hand or foot pump. Since they distribute the load over a large area, the pressure doesn't have to be too high and the nice thing about them is that they don't damage the vehicle. If such a thing was available, it would be pretty light and pack away pretty small. It would only need 500lb of lift at most. I've done a quick search but haven't found anything yet.

I'm basically looking for something that would help me right the bike if it went down in some awkward position and no help was available. If it falls over in my garage at home, I can deal with it!
 

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Exactly, a jack and some chunks of wood underneath....[lucky you didn't blow out the garage wall!]

After having to pick up my Wee in the driveway last week [dumb tipover!], I thought that I'd almost reached my limit for picking up stuff! It's a BIG BIKE! Scared me a bit too, thinking that there would be situations where just one person will not be enuff...it ain't no RM125!
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)

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I am past my mid 50's, bad back, worse knees and I can't imagine a situation where I could not drag the bike around enough to get on the right side to lift. I have had bikes off road in some nasty stuff and sometimes had to unload the luggage to reduce the weight. It would have to be an awfully big tree to block that side (not likely in NJ). If it is up against a wall there are likely to be people. The plus side of it being up against a tree (been there) is the bike isn't laying flat. It is already partly up - the hardest part of the lift is the first part. You are over thinking this - go to the gym.
 

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I'm gravely disappointed in ALL of you. :frown:

Do you not have WIVES? :confused:

I simply wedge the wife back there, carefully, because I don't want to scratch the bike......and tell her to PUSH or we will be late for the 80% off SALE at new hip clothing store.

Magically, in a few seconds, the bike is up, on it's stand, washed and waxed......

....and I take her down to WalMart.

:bom_beatnik:
 
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