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Discussion Starter #1
YES, I did search and search but I was unable to find the exact answers.

I just recently brought home a 09' Wee with just over 10k miles. I noticed the right fork seal is leaking so I have decided to perform a fork over haul.

I'm about 200lbs in gear so I'm going to order the 1.00kg Sonic Springs with 15w oil and would like to replace the seals. Does anyone have suggestions on what else should be replaced when pulling everything apart or will just the springs and seals be OK? I prefer to do everything right the first time if possible.

Also what are the thoughts on a aftermarket vs OEM seals?

Any help is much appreciated!!

Also here is a Pic of the VStrom I'm attempting to bring back to life after some serious neglecting

:thumbup:

 

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YES, I did search and search but I was unable to find the exact answers.

I just recently brought home a 09' Wee with just over 10k miles. I noticed the right fork seal is leaking so I have decided to perform a fork over haul.

I'm about 200lbs in gear so I'm going to order the 1.00kg Sonic Springs with 15w oil and would like to replace the seals. Does anyone have suggestions on what else should be replaced when pulling everything apart or will just the springs and seals be OK? I prefer to do everything right the first time if possible.

Also what are the thoughts on a aftermarket vs OEM seals?

Any help is much appreciated!!...
1.0 is a lot of spring for your weight on the Wee, I'd go with 0.90s.
I personally like 15w fork oil, it's good for very aggressive riding but it makes the ride a little harsh over sharp bumps. Most people are a lot happier with 10w.

I prefer OEM seals. Checks the fork tubes for tiny pit or dings, that's usually what causes the seals to leak. Buff the tubes lightly with some extra fine steel wool.

Bushings are probably fine, but it doesn't hurt to check.
 

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'09 with 10k probably does not need new seals unless there is damage as Rich describes. Very likely is just a bit of crud in the seal. This can be cleaned with a thin stiff piece of plastic slipped around the oil seal while it is in place. The dust seal slides up easily.

I'm about 210# with gear or a bit more. 0.90 mm/kg springs work very well for me. I'd stick with .90 and 10 wt oil for a rider of our weight.

The only special tool to disassemble the fork tubes is a long 6 mm hex bit to remove the bolt that holds the damper rod in place. An impact wrench is useful to spin the bolt out and spin it back in when reassembling. Otherwise, take the bolt out with the spring in place and the spacer and spring cap installed to reduce the chance of the damper rod just turning as you turn the bolt. This bolt has a copper gasket that is likely OK to reuse; it's never a bad idea to renew the copper gaskets. The wear parts are the bushings, the oil seal, and the dust seal. Unless there was misalignment, the bushings are likely OK well beyond 10k. The dust seal will be OK unless is it shows cracks. Be careful to tap the outer bushing into place straight and all the way down, then carefully push the oil seal into place straight and all the way down so its snap ring finds its groove.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
0.90 springs and 10w oil ordered! I also plan to clean the forks up and replace dust seals.

Thanks for the advice, I will post up thoughts once I complete the task!

:thumbup:
 

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Parts Unlimited's house brand seals work fantastically. I've installed them in more bikes than I can count and I have not had a single bike return with a premature failure. OEM seals are of course wonderful as well, but come with a higher price tag.

Whatever you do, stay away from Leak-Proof brand seals at all cost. There are a few other aftermarket companies out there running the same design that Leak-Proof uses. We refuse to install these seals at our shop because they are almost guaranteed to leak.
 

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maybe less work

due to low miles on your bike , replace springs and oil (suck it out) with forks remaining on bike - do NOT open it all up - and try that "strip of plastic" trick on the fork seals to remove any crud

you can pull the springs, spacer and washers out the forks with a hooked coat hanger wire

slurp oil out with Mightvac hooked up to copper tubing (or similar) - so you can poke tubing all way down to bottom of the damper rod


you can always tear it all apart later if the seal still leaks

would you consider moving to Cogent DDC drop in cartridges while you are doing this? You would need to buy special cartridge oil.
 

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Others have posted what I would recommend. I have two DL 650's in the garage ( '04 and '12 ) and both have .90 rate springs and 10 weight oil. While the chart says I would do well with .95 springs I was more interested in a good ride than all out performance. Both bikes also have cartridge emulators as well, which does require a complete disassembly of the forks. That is actually pretty easy on these bikes. But better springs and 10w oil will be an improvement. The 2012 and up 650's seem to have a better front suspension. But the only difference I could find between them is the springs....
 

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disassembly

for Cogent DDC drop in - no disassembly off the bike is req'd. I did post up a bit on the subject after I did the work.
 

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due to low miles on your bike , replace springs and oil (suck it out) with forks remaining on bike - do NOT open it all up - and try that "strip of plastic" trick on the fork seals to remove any crud

you can pull the springs, spacer and washers out the forks with a hooked coat hanger wire

slurp oil out with Mightvac hooked up to copper tubing (or similar) - so you can poke tubing all way down to bottom of the damper rod


you can always tear it all apart later if the seal still leaks

would you consider moving to Cogent DDC drop in cartridges while you are doing this? You would need to buy special cartridge oil.
Never quite understood leaving the tubes on the bike. It's actually faster to take them off, and you do a better job of getting all the really gunky oil out of the bottom of the tubes if you have them off the bike and can invert them. That's especially true the first time the fork oil's been changed, lot of wear metal particles in there from the bushings wearing in.
Also easier to set the oil level.
 

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Never quite understood leaving the tubes on the bike. It's actually faster to take them off, and you do a better job of getting all the really gunky oil out of the bottom of the tubes if you have them off the bike and can invert them. That's especially true the first time the fork oil's been changed, lot of wear metal particles in there from the bushings wearing in.
Also easier to set the oil level.
I have done it both ways, at home in my garage, and I stand by what I said.

At only 10k miles there is no need to tear the forks fully apart etc unless his fork seal leak proves insurmountable.
 

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Discussion Starter #11


Just waiting on a new seals to put everything back together!

Thanks Rich for the quick shipping.... Can't wait to try these out with the 0.90s and 10w oil!

:thumbup:
 

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...Thanks Rich for the quick shipping.... Can't wait to try these out with the 0.90s and 10w oil!

:thumbup:
No problem. :) Let me know if you have any questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #15






Well the job is complete. I also mounted some fresh rubber while everything was apart. I wish I had some better photos of this Wee when I first picked it up.. It was trashed and neglected. I have spent some serious time trying to bring her back from the dead!

The front end feels awesome and very stiff but the front brakes really seem to be under powered and its very noticeable now. :confused:

:thumbup:
 

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The front end feels awesome and very stiff but the front brakes really seem to be under powered and its very noticeable now.
What are you comparing them to? This is a bike designed as a dual sport. As much as I think it is really a street bike, I understand the brakes are a compromise so they don't become too touchy off road. It takes more muscle to lock them up (or engage the ABS) than the average street bike. As long as it is still possible to do that, I'm happy with the brakes. Two finger brakers won't be happy and it takes changing the calipers and maybe even the master cylinder on 2007 and later models to get a significantly lighter effort braking system.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
What are you comparing them to? This is a bike designed as a dual sport. As much as I think it is really a street bike, I understand the brakes are a compromise so they don't become too touchy off road. It takes more muscle to lock them up (or engage the ABS) than the average street bike. As long as it is still possible to do that, I'm happy with the brakes. Two finger brakers won't be happy and it takes changing the calipers and maybe even the master cylinder on 2007 and later models to get a significantly lighter effort braking system.
I understand your point and to be honest I still have very little miles in the saddle on my new Wee. I have a sport bike background and even my last bike (Versys) had a much better braking feel with a lot less effort needed.

I'm going to enjoy my bike in the mean time and perhaps if it's needed I will perform the 4 piston upgrade.

:mrgreen:
 
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