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Discussion Starter #1
I managed to get stuck in a nice deep mud hole. Water was at the seat level, with the exhaust under water. It stayed running but I had to shut it off.
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Once I pulled it out I was afraid to try to turn it over, for fear of water in the cylinders. So luckily, I was able to call my son, and we were able to tow it home. Pulled the plugs, and drained the crankcase. All kinds on water in the crankcase (looked like a quart of water added in). However, there was no water in the air box. After a few drain and fills every looks good, and bike is running as it should. The question is, how did the water get in? I thought the only crank vent was to the air box.
 

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I should have gotten off and scouted it, but I had been riding all morning, and everything was going too well. Had I taken the time too look, the first thing I would have noticed was at least a half dozen broken tow straps! That should have been a Clue to measure the depth, and the softness of the bottom, of that pit.

Thanks for your response, and I thought exhaust also, but there was not that much water in the pistons, there was some, so who knows.
 

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Hmmm, it would not be the exhaust as to get into the crank case from there it would have to go past the piston rings...
The air box was dry you say?

Check your PCV hose that runs between your crank case right beside the water pump and the airbox for cracks and leaks.

I just dont see another way for the water to get into the oil sump...
 

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Thanks for your reply, like I said no water in the air box. That’s why I was stumped, but I will check out the PCV hose per your suggestion. Thanks again for the input.
 

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Wow...what a picture! I know who's gonna win the next Picture of the Week game when somebody calls for pictures of "Your bike near water"!! 😁

Seems the only way water would get in is someplace where oil or coolant has been getting "out". Do you have any leaks?

There's also a weep hole on the sides of the cylinders, but those are tiny; can't imagine them sucking in any water.
 
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I should have gotten off and scouted it, but I had been riding all morning, and everything was going too well. Had I taken the time too look, the first thing I would have noticed was at least a half dozen broken tow straps! That should have been a Clue to measure the depth, and the softness of the bottom, of that pit.

Thanks for your response, and I thought exhaust also, but there was not that much water in the pistons, there was some, so who knows.
Another case that proves Hindsight is always 2020.... Hope you don't suffer any long term issue with your bike.
 

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When the bike was shut off water got sucked back through the exhaust valves.

Water doesn't compress so it will get past the rings.
 

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Just wondering... How good is the countershaft seal - the one behind the front sprocket? If submerged under some 50cm of water, would that be enough pressure to let some water through? Likewise for the clutch pushrod seal.

In addition to the PCV hose, also check the breather hoses from the cylinder heads. They go to a valve assembly on the right of the airbox and from there into the airbox as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow...what a picture! I know who's gonna win the next Picture of the Week game when somebody calls for pictures of "Your bike near water"!! 😁

Seems the only way water would get in is someplace where oil or coolant has been getting "out". Do you have any leaks?

There's also a weep hole on the sides of the cylinders, but those are tiny; can't imagine them sucking in any water.
Thanks for your reply, no leaks that I know of. Not loosing coolant or oil, so I don’t think there are any leaks.
 

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When the bike was shut off water got sucked back through the exhaust valves.

Water doesn't compress so it will get past the rings.
[/

I appreciate the reply, I guess this makes the most sense. But this is why I did not turn it over, and I thought there would have been more water in the pistons when I pulled the plugs.
 

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Just wondering... How good is the countershaft seal - the one behind the front sprocket? If submerged under some 50cm of water, would that be enough pressure to let some water through? Likewise for the clutch pushrod seal.

In addition to the PCV hose, also check the breather hoses from the cylinder heads. They go to a valve assembly on the right of the airbox and from there into the airbox as well.
Thanks for the reply, I will check those seals and see how they look. I appreciate the suggestions.
 

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I appreciate the reply, I guess this makes the most sense. But this is why I did not turn it over, and I thought there would have been more water in the pistons when I pulled the plugs.
Water going through the airbox typically fills up the cylinder. The bike isn't running at that point.

Water is not going to get through the seals, if they hold in oil they will keep out water. Breather hoses and the PCV connect to the airbox. Could be loose on the motor end of damaged somehow.
 

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You are very lucky that the engine did not hydro-lock. I have an ATV in my shop right now that has a bent rod from the owner doing something similar. I think the ATV may be a write off, the cost to rebuild it is more than it is worth.
 

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You are very lucky that the engine did not hydro-lock. I have an ATV in my shop right now that has a bent rod from the owner doing something similar. I think the ATV may be a write off, the cost to rebuild it is more than it is worth.
Thats why I did not even try to turn it over once it was out. Towed it home and pulled the plugs, and drained the oil. It’s running fine with no issues. But your right it could have been a lot worse. I appreciate your reply.
 

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If there was enough water in the cylinder to push past the rings it would have hydro locked and bent the conrod or worse. I'd be looking for a loose/detached or split crankcase vent hose.
 

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Oh, if you're checking anyway, also check (and maybe lubricate with some silicon grease) the o-ring in the oil filler cap, and maybe in the two inspection ports (the ones you need to see the F|T mark, and to rotate the crank, when doing a valve clearance check/adjustment).

Between the airbox, exhaust, the 3 breather hoses, the seals around the output shaft and clutch pushrod, the oil filler cap and those two inspection ports I think we've just about covered every conceivable way water can get into the crankcase.

(Actually, now that I'm thinking about it - the air box is not the only way air can get into the throttle bodies. I recently had an injector "cushion" fail on me, which let air into the airbox via a gap around the injector. Theoretically that could also get water into the cylinders, and from there into the crankcase, but that's highly unlikely in this scenario. Similarly for a vacuum failure - you'd have other symptoms, well before you got the bike wet.)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Oh, if you're checking anyway, also check (and maybe lubricate with some silicon grease) the o-ring in the oil filler cap, and maybe in the two inspection ports (the ones you need to see the F|T mark, and to rotate the crank, when doing a valve clearance check/adjustment).

Between the airbox, exhaust, the 3 breather hoses, the seals around the output shaft and clutch pushrod, the oil filler cap and those two inspection ports I think we've just about covered every conceivable way water can get into the crankcase.

(Actually, now that I'm thinking about it - the air box is not the only way air can get into the throttle bodies. I recently had an injector "cushion" fail on me, which let air into the airbox via a gap around the injector. Theoretically that could also get water into the cylinders, and from there into the crankcase, but that's highly unlikely in this scenario. Similarly for a vacuum failure - you'd have other symptoms, well before you got the bike wet.)
Thanks for the suggestions I will take a look, and lube as you suggested.
 
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