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I developed a small leak in my gas tank that was difficult to troubleshoot. I would like to warn you so you can avoid the same problem.
The last valve adjustment the mechanic replaced the hose clamp that holds the air intake to the air box and left the screw mechanism in a 12:00 position directly under the bottom of the tank. After a few thousand miles vibration and contact with the tank eroded a pinhole in the tank.
I had performed a fuel filter mod on the bike at 95,000 while in Alaska. While doing the mod I reused the gasket holding the fuel pump to the tank so I thought this was the source of the leak. After replacing the gasket the tank still leaked. I pulled the tank off again and found the very tiny leak. I then discovered the cause by comparing the shape of the bare metal at the leak to the fresh wear mark on the clamp near the hole. I patched the hole and turned the clamp about 30 degrees away from vertical.
You can see the small V shaped wear mark in the underside of the tank and the fresh wear mark on the hose clamp bracket.
 

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Could you please post a photo of the clamp that caused the hole?

Maybe it's because I have a DL1000, but I can't figure out what would have rubbed against the tank in that location.
 

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Farkle Purchasing System
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Ah, I see. I wouldn't have thought that clamp could make contact.

Clearly there's a reason for the clamp positions specified in the service manual.
 

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I remember guys carrying Fels Naptha soap on jeep trips to plug small leaks like yours. It isn't a cure all but might help in emergencies.
It's always a bother when a mechanic makes things worse.
 

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It's always a bother when a mechanic makes things worse.
I know a good bike mechanic but regardless, I like to do most of my work myself. I think I pay more attention to detail (like putting clamps back the way they were originally), costs less, allows me to see what else is going on. I'm riding the machine and it's my a$$ on the line so I do it right, if not, I pay the price.
Same thing with house projects (major and minor), I have 1 contractor friend that I trust and I rarely call him in.
 

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I know a good bike mechanic but regardless, I like to do most of my work myself. I think I pay more attention detail (like putting clamps back the way they were originally), costs less, allows me to see what else is going on. I'm riding the machine and it's my a$$ on the line so I do it right, if not, I pay the price.
Same thing with house projects (major and minor), I have 1 contractor friend that I trust and I rarely call him in.
It's certainly eye-opening to do your own work.

You quickly understand not only why mechanics charge what they do, but also where corners may be cut.

It is not at all difficult to follow the Vstrom service manual diagram for orientation of those clamp rings. First, though, you have to be bothered to get a copy of the manual, look it up, and refer to it when doing the work.
 

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"It's certainly eye-opening to do your own work. "

Wallet controlling too. It doesn't open as wide when I'm the guy doing the work. I pay for materials and not the labor.
Although I've told the wife I dislike having to learn a new skill with new projects.
I just replaced a garbage disposal. The old one finally got a crack in the plastic body and leaked when it was run. My cost $109 at Home Despot and an hour and a half of futzing around.
The Wee I have has needed no major work other than a valve check 20K miles ago, and a fork seal...Yay Black Lab videos! And a shock job by Sasquatch. VStom DL650 is a good thing.
 

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View attachment 268622 View attachment 268621 I developed a small leak in my gas tank that was difficult to troubleshoot. I would like to warn you so you can avoid the same problem.
The last valve adjustment the mechanic replaced the hose clamp that holds the air intake to the air box and left the screw mechanism in a 12:00 position directly under the bottom of the tank. After a few thousand miles vibration and contact with the tank eroded a pinhole in the tank.
I had performed a fuel filter mod on the bike at 95,000 while in Alaska. While doing the mod I reused the gasket holding the fuel pump to the tank so I thought this was the source of the leak. After replacing the gasket the tank still leaked. I pulled the tank off again and found the very tiny leak. I then discovered the cause by comparing the shape of the bare metal at the leak to the fresh wear mark on the clamp near the hole. I patched the hole and turned the clamp about 30 degrees away from vertical.
You can see the small V shaped wear mark in the underside of the tank and the fresh wear mark on the hose clamp bracket.
Excellent sleuthing and reporting, docsabre. Thanks.

Sent from my moto g(7) using Tapatalk
 
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