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Ok, so I noticed a discrepancy in my actions between the start-up of my bike and my car ('98 civic). For my bike, I start the engine before I put my gloves on and let it idle as long as it takes me, usually about 30 seconds, and then I ride off conservatively (at least at first). My reasoning on this brief period of minimal load on the engine is so that the oil has time to resupply oil to the components in the engine that the oil drained off during the time the engine was off.

However, in my car I usually just start the engine and drive off conservatively (at least at first). [By driving conservatively after start-up, I mean that I do not rev the engine excessively, accelerate "hard," and not flog the crap out if the vehicle until the coolant is registering and on its way too normal temps.] I guess I don't care enough about the car to try to go out of my way to be nice to it.

How do you treat the engines in your vehicles? Do you treat the bike better than the others?
 

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Starting an engine and driving/riding off gently pretty much immediately is the best strategy IF is is safe to drive and IF you don't live on a ramp to a 75 mph highway.

Oil pressure is almost instant on an engine, the engine runs much smoother at moderate revs stressing parts less, it warms up much quicker when running, blow-by gasses and water have less time to collect in the oil and turn it into acids, the engine management takes it off the rich fuel mixture sooner when warming faster reducing the excess amounts of fuel that wash the oil off of your cylinders and pollution is reduced.

There isn't a lot of good reason to idle nowadays in a modern engine.

..Tom
 

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I remember when one guy didn't believe an engine warms up faster when driven at moderate rpms. He figured the air moving over the engine would keep it cooler longer. I did a comparison to prove it and riding the bike conservatively warmed it up much faster than idling it.
 

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Starting an engine and driving/riding off gently pretty much immediately is the best strategy IF is is safe to drive and IF you don't live on a ramp to a 75 mph highway.

Oil pressure is almost instant on an engine, the engine runs much smoother at moderate revs stressing parts less, it warms up much quicker when running, blow-by gasses and water have less time to collect in the oil and turn it into acids, the engine management takes it off the rich fuel mixture sooner when warming faster reducing the excess amounts of fuel that wash the oil off of your cylinders and pollution is reduced.

There isn't a lot of good reason to idle nowadays in a modern engine.

..Tom
Put perfectly!
 

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I pretty much just crank and go with all our vehicles, unless as mentioned the windows need to defrost. With the strom, I wait for at least the second temp bar before doing anything stressful. This can take anywhere from a few hundred feet to a few miles, depending on outside temps.
 

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Slow........

Personally (my opinion, so don't flame me for thinking this way).....I think starting an engine (any engine) and letting it idle 15-45 seconds produces less "initial strain" on the internal parts......like he said in the first post, it allows oil (somewhat warmer oil....granted, maybe not by much??) to circulate to all the moving parts slowly. Note: I didn't say this was the "fastest way" to warm up an engine to "Operating Temperature"......I'm just saying I think it's the least-strainuous method on the engine......allowing metals (bearings, rings, etc) in the engine to come up to operating mode.
Or.....maybe I'm just getting old and it takes me longer to get going....!!!
 

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I think Mark is actually correct but....

The Wee usually starts out at 5:00 AM so it's dark. I usually scan the dash, put the brights on, put it in gear and go. I have about 1/2 mile of wending 1 lane road before getting on the 55 mph country road - so it does get a bit of a warm up.

Alan
 

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Does it hurt anything to let it warm up till 1 bar shows before riding?
 

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Does it hurt anything to let it warm up till 1 bar shows before riding?
Apart from higher wear on the engine, quicker degradation of the oil, higher fuel consumption, more pollution and longer warm-up probably not.

..Tom
 

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I only let mine run for the time it takes me to put the helmet and gloves on, then run it conservatively until three bars show up.

The colder it gets, however (like 20's and 30 degree temps), I do let it warm a little more before taking off.

I have seen some guys start up their bikes at work and take off right away, no matter the temperatures. These bikes are/were newer (less than a year old) and many of them were puffing blue smoke out the tail pipe every time they started 'em and took off right away. Just sayin'...:beatnik:
 

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I wait for one bar when possible. (It's not always possible on the ferry.)

It does warm up faster under load, and I'm sure it won't hurt it a bit if I ride gently until it's warm. However, on a bike, I sometimes need hard throttle to escape being killed, and I prefer to have the engine ready to accept that before I leave the driveway.

Just my quirk.
 

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I start it up, get on gear, then off I go.
 

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Well s*%t. Looks like I have destroyed my 650. Guess I'll toss it in the bulk trash pickup this afternoon. Shame though none the less.
 

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I start it up, get on gear, then off I go.
This. And sometimes the little guy who sits on my shoulder :flaming_devil: talks me into not starting the bike until I'm sitting on it and about to ride off. :jawdrop:

And the bike doesn't even have any blue smoke.
 

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Fire it up and go.

Crikey, it's a modern fuel-injected engine, not a clapped-out 1943 Hupmobile.


I do the same with my carbureted vintage bikes as well. If you need choke for more than 30-45 seconds, and it won't run smoothly enough to immediately ride away on the choke, you have an idle mixture problem to sort out.

The idea that certain engines are "naturally cold-blooded" is nonsense -- their fueling systems (whether that's carburetors or fuel injection) are just not calibrated correctly. Granted, this problem usually originates with ridiculous outdated government demands, compounded by wear and deterioration, but it's easily surmountable.
 

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Fire it up and go.

Crikey, it's a modern fuel-injected engine, not a clapped-out 1943 Hupmobile.


I do the same with my carbureted vintage bikes as well. If you need choke for more than 30-45 seconds, and it won't run smoothly enough to immediately ride away on the choke, you have an idle mixture problem to sort out.

The idea that certain engines are "naturally cold-blooded" is nonsense -- their fueling systems (whether that's carburetors or fuel injection) are just not calibrated correctly. Granted, this problem usually originates with ridiculous outdated government demands, compounded by wear and deterioration, but it's easily surmountable.
Cant say I agree with you on that.
 

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Here in the summertime in the afternoon, it is already at 1 bar before hitting the starter button, and this is after sitting outside for 9-10 hours.
 
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