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I own an '08 Wee from North America. I want to add an O2 sensor. How difficult would this be?
 

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I own an '08 Wee from North America. I want to add an O2 sensor. How difficult would this be?
It would require a Euro ECU and wiring harness. Are you aware it's only an emissions control device and will do nothing for performance?
 

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It would require a Euro ECU and wiring harness.
I was hoping it would be as simple as buying a $20. sensor and plugging it into the existing harness. Anyone with a euro bike that needs a North American wiring harness?

Are you aware it's only an emissions control device and will do nothing for performance?
It's the OCD in me. Also call me a hippie, but I like clean air. It's one of the reasons I started riding in the first place. It also annoys me when I get knocking on low octane fuel at high altitude. I believe that an engine run at stoichiometric will last longer than one run anywhere else.

I thought it had one when I bought it!
 

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High altitude means a lower octane requirement. My 650 runs fine on 85 octane over 5000ft. Good on ya for your concern about the environment. Most questions about emissions here are about taking the emissions gear off.
 

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High altitude means a lower octane requirement.
I thought it was the other way around. Not trying to argue; a quick internet search shows I got it wrong. Now that I think about it the high octane didn't help as much as I assumed; I remember knocking around 9000ft on 91 octane.

Just chalk up another reason for the O2 sensor. I thought I left these altitude problems behind with my carburated bike.
 

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An O2 sensor will not help with an off kilter mixture. Try using 85 octane if it is available locally or 87 at lower altitudes. If it pings, something is wrong. It may need a throttle body synch or it may have a loose boot on the throttle body allowing an air leak. A properly set up 650 should not ping, especially at higher altitudes. The dual plug heads are very good at mixture firing control. Make sure all four plugs are okay too.
 

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I would not call it a "ping," more like a tickle. Or maybe a tick. Only at altitude though. It seemed worse with 85 octane but now that I think back, both were offenders.

I have yet to do the TBS, something about needing a special tool. I hate special tools and love riding. It's on the "when the snow flies" list.
 

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You may be mistaking the typical clatter the engine makes for pinging. It may be camshaft end float but sounds like tapping two hammerheads together and is louder when cold. It is normal. Pinging sounds like rattling a tin can with some BBs in it that is especially noticeable if the throttle is opened wide at low rpms, like 3000-3500 to start with, and should be addressed.
 

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You may be mistaking the typical clatter the engine makes for pinging. It may be camshaft end float but sounds like tapping two hammerheads together and is louder when cold. It is normal. Pinging sounds like rattling a tin can with some BBs in it that is especially noticeable if the throttle is opened wide at low rpms, like 3000-3500 to start with, and should be addressed.
It is definitely NOT hard pinging; the kind that damages your engine and makes your block ring like a bell. I've heard that before, even from the Wee just before I stalled it on a hill.

There is nothing wrong with the engine.

The engine just makes this noise, at altitude, under moderate to high power. I don't know if the O2 sensor would solve the problem or not. I didn't want an O2 sensor to fix this "problem," I just hoped that if I got one, it would help.
 

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I think you have a normal noise there. See if you can locate another Wee in your area to compare. An O2 sensor will do nothing for any noise. It will just be a part of an anti-pollution enhancement. A bike with an O2 sensor and related systems will meet the present Euro pollution standards which are a little tougher than the present California standard. The latter will be met by your bike if there a California statement on the frame placard.
 

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The latter will be met by your bike if there a California statement on the frame placard.
Since you mentioned it, I have wondered if my bike is Cali emissions or not; the label is vague. I'll get a pic & go from there.

Please keep in mind that I am not trying to fix this sound, I just thought the O2 sensor would help. All I know for sure is it is somehow related to altitude. My last bike made the sound as well.

I wanted the O2 sensor not to solve any problem, but well "just 'cause" I guess. As an engineer, I believe that everything runs better with feedback. At my former place of employment we spent the last year and a half on a project that, among other things, added a wideband O2 sensor to a snowmobile. Had to use a can opener and a pry bar for that one! ;)

I've also bragged to other engineers about my bike, only to find out from my wiring diagram to be wrong.
In the end it's the 21st century already! Time to put away archaic technologies like shunt regulators and fuel maps!
 

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The ambient air pressure sensor takes care of the altitude. There is nothing archaic about fuel maps. DL1000 owners play with fuel maps a lot because emissions regulations are met with ultra lean, pushing the envelope mixtures. The DL650 has a later engine design able to meet standards by adding a spark plug to each cylinder and taking settings like idle speed out of the owner's adjustment capability. The fuel map is a part of any electronic fuel injection system. Modern engines are all running leaner than stoichiometric for emissions purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The ambient air pressure sensor takes care of the altitude. There is nothing archaic about fuel maps. DL1000 owners play with fuel maps a lot because emissions regulations are met with ultra lean, pushing the envelope mixtures. The DL650 has a later engine design able to meet standards by adding a spark plug to each cylinder and taking settings like idle speed out of the owner's adjustment capability. The fuel map is a part of any electronic fuel injection system. Modern engines are all running leaner than stoichiometric for emissions purposes.
I still have not given up on this. There is little difference between the two wiring diagrams; my existing one could probably be modified. The connector could be an issue as the ECU for Europe has two extra pins.

Greywolf, I hear what you are saying, but the whole thing seems like a kludge to me. I understand that even with an O2 sensor I might not be where I want to be ratio-wise. I assume I could fix it with a remapping. I know much more about electronics than FI systems, even though my company has designed them before. One cannot be an expert at everything!

I should admit to a seething hatred of internal combustion engines. They are filthy, noisy, overly complex,... I replace them with electric motors wherever possible!

This could turn out to be the most useless farkle ever. I may never do it, as it means acquiring an ECU from Europe, $$$$. A lot of money to spend on something that just makes me feel better. I also have not looked into the catalytic converter, don't know if I have the right one for use closed-loop.

My goals are:
1 - make the engine last as long as possible.
2 - clean up the emissions a little.
3 - have a farkle that no one else does.

Performance is NOT a goal.

Oh, and don't get me started where emissions laws are considered. They seem to have been written up by a drunken monkey in front of a typewriter! Every year they pick on something new. If it isn't NoX, it's soot, or something else we didn't have to worry about last year. Like I said before, I like clean air. But those idiots that come up with the regs, I just don't get it. I do not envy the job of vehicle manufacturers in this respect.
 

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I would sell your Strom......or go back to a bike with a carb.
 

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