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Discussion Starter #1
I have not had my bike long. So I have not had a flat yet. But as my rides get longer I would like to know how to replace a flat on the road by myself. Is that doable? I can replace bicycle tires no problem. Can anyone point to a video or instructions as to how to replace a v-storm flat? And the appropriate tools to put under the seat? Thanks a lot.
 

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unless you have spoked, tubed wheels (which stroms do not), you would put a plug in the tire. It's actually quite easy to do either in your garage or on the side of the road. Get yourself a tire plug repair and keep it on the bike - it will fit under the seat. Walmart, amazon, revzilla, etc. See Youtube for how to.
Also, these are generally regarded as temporary fixes. If you end plugging a tire, you'll want to get to a dealer to have a permanent plug (from the inside) if possible, or have to replace the tire.
 

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Also, it is possible to replace your own tires with just tire irons. It's a bit of work, but if I can do it, most can.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. Ordered a slime and patch kit....
 

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This: Stop & Go Pocket Tubeless Tire Plugger

Plus a co2 inflator and you're set.

Sent from my SM-T700 using Tapatalk
 

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Hi Strombastic

+1 for Marcham, although there are cheap and small 12v compressors that take up less room than the Co2 inflators required to inflate a tyre to the correct pressure .

Cheers Bruce(Strom)
 

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Just watch videos for how to plug a tire in general. It's the same for a car tire or motorcycle tire as far as the process goes. I would say to pay more attention to cutting the plug right at the base of the tread patern though, don't let it stick up at all. NOTE: For a motorcycle tire and a traditional goopy strip plug, consider this a desperate stop gap only. Don't ride on the highway with one of those plugs in there, and don't take any corners fast. Your motorcycle is not as forgiving or gentle as a car tire...

As people have said though, for a permanent fix to a motorcycle tire, you need to use the internal mushroom type plug. You can get them and store then on your bike too, but they are more expensive than a traditional plug kit.

Also beware of the slime kits. I have 1 that was good, but others are pretty worthless. You need to get the reamer that actually has teeth. Some of their kits just have a little spiral reamer and it doesn't rip any rubber, so it doesn't really clean out the rubber. The good one wasn't even the most expensive one, and didn't have the T-handles. And avoid their compressors. I have had several and they are very inconsistent and very loud. If you want to carry one, get a dedicated small bike compressor, and if you want a good shop or car one, try viair on amazon. I have one of theirs and it is small and silent.
 

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Just watch videos for how to plug a tire in general. It's the same for a car tire or motorcycle tire as far as the process goes. I would say to pay more attention to cutting the plug right at the base of the tread patern though, don't let it stick up at all. NOTE: For a motorcycle tire and a traditional goopy strip plug, consider this a desperate stop gap only. Don't ride on the highway with one of those plugs in there, and don't take any corners fast. Your motorcycle is not as forgiving or gentle as a car tire...

As people have said though, for a permanent fix to a motorcycle tire, you need to use the internal mushroom type plug. You can get them and store then on your bike too, but they are more expensive than a traditional plug kit.

Also beware of the slime kits. I have 1 that was good, but others are pretty worthless. You need to get the reamer that actually has teeth. Some of their kits just have a little spiral reamer and it doesn't rip any rubber, so it doesn't really clean out the rubber. The good one wasn't even the most expensive one, and didn't have the T-handles. And avoid their compressors. I have had several and they are very inconsistent and very loud. If you want to carry one, get a dedicated small bike compressor, and if you want a good shop or car one, try viair on amazon. I have one of theirs and it is small and silent.


Personal injury lawyer? :grin2:

String plugs are safe to ride on. If the tire is holding air it's good. Thousands of miles riding on string plugged tires.

Any puncture in the sidewall should be considered a fatality though. Only plug in the tread area.

Slime kits and compressors are fine.
 

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Personal injury lawyer? :grin2:

String plugs are safe to ride on. If the tire is holding air it's good. Thousands of miles riding on string plugged tires.

Any puncture in the sidewall should be considered a fatality though. Only plug in the tread area.

Slime kits and compressors are fine.
Mechanical Engineer:nerd:. You may ride thousands of miles on a string plug, but that doesn't mean it's consistently safe to do so. Different people applying the plug, different quality of plug, the use of rubber cement, there are lots of sources of variation. Being aggressive on a poorly installed plug could result in a fast leak and possibly losing pressure at highway speeds, or around a corner. That's not a guaranteed wreck or anything, but I don't want to experience it anyway.

And I was only referring to the reamer tool in the different slime kits. One of them is great, I've been using it for years. A couple other slime kits had a reamer that didn't abrade the rubber at all, not great. My neighbor leaves screws in the driveway alot, so I've had to plug an abnormal quantity of car tires...

And that's fine if you like the compressors. I've had 3 of them and 2 have broken prematurely. We're both anecdotal here, so that's fine. I'm just trying to give my recommendation; I love the Viair compressor. It's quiet.
 
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Here are two videos that show slightly different methods, I don't think it can be overstated how much easier a warm tire will go on. These are joking when saying keep the lip down on the opposite side. I've changed my fair share of tires and I never got one off and on as easy these guys do.
 
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