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What would you suggest doing to fix it on a DL 2018 bike? If I am on my own (I don't have much mechanic experience) - how can I check the issue myself, or describe it properly to a mechanic so that he can verify whether it is the issue I have (and how to fix it)? Thanks so much!
It will be difficult and probably expensive to troubleshoot the issue while having to pay a mechanic to do the work. Troubleshooting often involves a lot of guessing, trial and error, seeing if you can impact the problem to provide more clues, etc. Here is my best shot if I were in your shoes;

First, understand the problem. If you are getting max vibrations at ~5200 RPM then the motor is not in primary balance. This will be felt all the way to red-line but is really bad at 5200 RPM and really noticeable in the seat, pegs, bars and mirrors. It also uncomfortably vibrated my junk (yes, my junk). To avoid it I'd have to keep it spinning well over 6K which is impractical and the whole riding experience was ruined. If I could not fix it I was going to sell it. It is also important to write down the history of the problem, when it occurred, did it get worse, was there any work done on around the time it occurred, etc. This is key because this can provide clues at to what to focus your efforts on and get to the cause.

Second, you need to distinguish between the motor being out of primary balance and something attached to the bike that has worked loose and just vibrating in sympathy (i.e. natural frequency) with normal motor vibes. This would be the case for loose panels, exhaust, crash bars, bag racks or cowling buzziness, etc. that just makes a lot of noise but you don't feel it in the seat, pegs, bars, etc. Finding and tightening or padding the offending component usually solves this issue without too much trouble. That said, if the motor is out of primary balance then a lot of things can be vibrating in sympathy and you will be chasing your tail by tightening things. For example, I bought my bike used and it came with both Givi crash bars and frame sliders (not installed at the same time). The seller had the Givi crash bars but they vibrated like a hive of angry bees right at 5200RPM. No matter how much I tightened them, even if stopped the buzz, if I reached down and felt them I could feel they were still vibrating. Once I found my TB leak they don't buzz at all and if I put my hand on them they don't vibrate any more than any other component on the bike.

Third, when riders are in a no-start condition the old adage is to verify air/fuel, spark and compression. This is a similar case except the bike is starting but something is wrong with one of these elements thus causing one of the cylinders to produce less power than the other. So it is running but just not in balance because of the different power between cylinders. So here is my list of things to rule out;


  • Check the spark plugs and wires
  • Check for vacuum leaks with carb spray
  • Check the compression
  • Check the valve timing and/or shims
  • Check the upper and lower TB boot clamps and o-rings.
  • Check the fuel injector o-rings
  • Check any vacuum hoses or T-splitters for cracks

I was lucky and found that the lower TB boot clamp was loose (probably came that way from the factory as the previous owner said it was always viby) so it was an easy fix.

I don't know if this is possible but perhaps a bad center spark plug could cause an imbalance. The bike has two plugs per cylinder and would continue to run with a dead center plug but probably be out of balance. I would pull the side plugs and the rear center plug (all easy to reach, mark them and don't mix them up) using the under-seat tool kit. Check the electrode color and see if one of the cylinders is running rich (dark color) or lean (whitish). Do a google search for sparkplug color diagnosis for pics for comparison. Check the gaps to make sure someone didn't bang a gap closed during installation. Unfortunately the front center plug is a bitch to get to so do that one later if nothing else turns up.

Get a can of carb cleaner and attach a long extension and spray cleaner around the TBs and vacuum hoses while the engine is idling and see if the engine surges. That is a sure sign of a vacuum leak (one caveat is not to spray too close to the airbox inlet or it will cause an idle surge giving a false positive).

If the bike has ever had the valves adjusted I would pull the valve covers and verify the cams are installed with the correct timing per the service manual.

It might be a long shot but you'd sure like to know if your brand new DL has imbalanced compression, so test the compression (mainly to rule it out).

As mentioned I pulled my TBs completely and found the lower, front TB clamp was completely loose. It looked like this;



If you pull the TBs then I would check these components in the diagrams below; The upper airbox boots are seated and tight (items 4,5 and 7 on the air box diagram). These boots are surprisingly easy to dislodge on my Gen2 L4 Wee. I had to reseat them a couple of times during reassembly and had to put downward pressure on the airbox lid to prevent tweaking the airbox and causing the boots to pop off when tightening the lid screws. That the lower cylinder inlet boots are not cracked and that the o-ring is not damaged or missing (items 13, 14, 15, 16 on the front cylinder diagram and equivalent on the rear). That the fuel injector o-rings are properly installed and not crushed or missing (item 11 on throttle body diagram). Off the top of my head these are all things that could put a motor out of balance but I am sure there are probably others so maybe others can add to the list of things to check.
 

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Thank you for such a detailed description. It seems that I will need a lot of time and some more tools to go through the whole list over the winter. The history of my problem is as follows:
1) I got a new DL 650 2018 from the dealer.
2) I bought with it a lot of accessories - engine plate, crash bars, givi luggage rack, and givi side cases.
3) I took the bike from the dealer, went home, took side cases off and went for a ride. I immediately noticed that something was wrong, and I could feel strange vibrations on my seat around 4500 RPM. When I touched the luggage rack they were vibrating strongly, together with the foot pegs (they are attached to them). No strong vibrations on the handlebars, or mirrors.
4) After couple of rides, reading forums where people had problems with crash bars I thought that it could be affecting my bike as well. But after more testing I noticed that the seat vibrates only when I don't have side cases on my luggage rack, so that would be the problem.
5) I went to the dealer to report the problem (twice) but they told me that everything is ok with the bike, it's a V-Twin so it will vibrate, and the problem may be caused by Givi accessories, not by the bike. At the dealer we also tested a demo bike, which seemed to vibrate as much as my bike. Around 4500 RPM the passenger foot pegs were vibrating, and the locker below the seat was ringing - exactly the same as on my bike.
6) I went home and took off luggage rack completely from the bike, and I had no more vibrations. It was a vibration-free for couple of weeks, then I tried to re-install the luggage rack with my mechanic, using rubber washers where metal to metal was connected. It didn't help.
7) I also have crash bars and they also vibrate, but I don't feel that on the seat so it's not uncomfortable for me. When I touch them they vibrate noticeable more around that 4500 RPM.

I guess at this point my questions are:

1) Is it possible that the bike is perfectly fine (as it should be), and just the accessories are causing those problems (maybe Givi didn't do a good job, or I have a bad pair of luggage rack)? Or how I feel them is very subjective and others may not find it disturbing?

2) Is it possible that the new DL 2018 vibrates more than previous versions (with or without accessories attached)? I mean, they changed the exhaust, seat, probably some other things, and that could affect how you can feel the vibrations, and how other elements that you attach to the bike vibrate.
 

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Thank you for such a detailed description. It seems that I will need a lot of time and some more tools to go through the whole list over the winter.
Based on your description below, I don't think it is a problem with the engine. A few explanatory comments and a few questions.

The history of my problem is as follows:
1) I got a new DL 650 2018 from the dealer.
How many miles now?

2) I bought with it a lot of accessories - engine plate, crash bars, givi luggage rack, and givi side cases.
3) I took the bike from the dealer, went home, took side cases off and went for a ride. I immediately noticed that something was wrong, and I could feel strange vibrations on my seat around 4500 RPM. When I touched the luggage rack they were vibrating strongly, together with the foot pegs (they are attached to them). No strong vibrations on the handlebars, or mirrors.
I think your accessories are just vibrating in sympathy with the motor, i.e., the motor is probably fine. When you took the side cases off you are changing the natural frequency and the racks are vibrating in sympathy with the motor at 4500RPM. With the cases on maybe the resonance frequency is 9000RPM (just as an example) so you don't notice it so much. This is an example of Mechanical Resonance and can destroy a bridge or building but can be a nuisance on a bike or cause stress cracking if run for a long time at peak vibrations.

When my Givi engine guards were vibrating (before I realized it was an out-of-balance motor) I researched it and other riders complained about Givi guards being particularly noisy on the Gen2 V-Strom. The fix was to modify the bolt/clamp at the union by the front cylinders. Others added weights to the bars or installed bungie cords both of which would change the natural frequency so it would not be so annoying at a critical (usually cruising) RPM. To kill the vibrations you might need to devise a way to securely add some temp weights to the racks when you don't have the side cases on. It probably won't take much weight to move the resonance frequency off the annoying RPM.

4) After couple of rides, reading forums where people had problems with crash bars I thought that it could be affecting my bike as well. But after more testing I noticed that the seat vibrates only when I don't have side cases on my luggage rack, so that would be the problem.
Makes sense as a resonance problem.


5) I went to the dealer to report the problem (twice) but they told me that everything is ok with the bike, it's a V-Twin so it will vibrate, and the problem may be caused by Givi accessories, not by the bike.
LOL, 90deg V-Twins are in primary balance which is why they don't need fancy split cranks or counter (balance) shafts to reduce vibrations. They run smooth as silk all the way to red-line (assuming nothing is wrong). Your dealer is thinking of 45deg or 60deg V-Twins (Harley Davidson?) Nevertheless, all motors do vibrate and your dealer is probably right about the Givi accessories causing the vibrations but that is a different problem.

At the dealer we also tested a demo bike, which seemed to vibrate as much as my bike. Around 4500 RPM the passenger foot pegs were vibrating, and the locker below the seat was ringing - exactly the same as on my bike.
Hmmm... was this demo bike completely stock (i.e. no racks or engine guards)? Also, I am not sure what the "locker below the seat" is. I thought I read about someone else with a Gen3 Wee who found the seat mount/latch was loose causing vibes, maybe that is Gen3 Wee issue?

6) I went home and took off luggage rack completely from the bike, and I had no more vibrations. It was a vibration-free for couple of weeks, then I tried to re-install the luggage rack with my mechanic, using rubber washers where metal to metal was connected. It didn't help.
Rubber washers won't hurt but you need to change the natural frequency of the racks without the side cases attached (something the manufacturer should have tested for). The only way to do that (as far as I know) is to add weight to the racks or change the tension on the structure using bungie cords.

7) I also have crash bars and they also vibrate, but I don't feel that on the seat so it's not uncomfortable for me. When I touch them they vibrate noticeable more around that 4500 RPM.
I think the Givi's will do that, they weren't properly tuned to the bike and can be annoying. They were really bad when my motor was out-of-balance but now that I fixed that they are hardly noticeable but I can feel them resonating when I pass through 5K RPM.

1) Is it possible that the bike is perfectly fine (as it should be), and just the accessories are causing those problems (maybe Givi didn't do a good job, or I have a bad pair of luggage rack)? Or how I feel them is very subjective and others may not find it disturbing?
Yes, from your description I think this is the case. I don't think the racks are bad per se just have a natural frequency right were you don't want it.

2) Is it possible that the new DL 2018 vibrates more than previous versions (with or without accessories attached)? I mean, they changed the exhaust, seat, probably some other things, and that could affect how you can feel the vibrations, and how other elements that you attach to the bike vibrate.
I don't know about this but its not a crazy thought as all those changes could have created an overall bike/motor/exhaust/frame resonance at 4500RPM. Resonance is hard to predict, also on my Gen2 the out-of-balance resonance is at 5200RPM so they could be a different issues. My experience was coming from a Gen1 to a Gen2, so their maybe some peculiarities with the Gen3 that I am not aware of but its the same basic motor and should run smooth to red-line.

For those trying to solve a vibration issue let me briefly describe my Gen2 experience. First, the vibes were always there but components on the bike would resonate and become noisy at 5200RPM. My Givi crash bars would buzz like a hive of angry bees. Even without the Givi bars the bike was always viby from 3K to 9K but had a peak at 5200RPM where the whole bike would shudder passing through that point from above or below. I would also feel the vibrations in the pegs, seat, and (less so) in bars. The bike was not enjoyable to ride at all and something was clearly wrong. In my case it turned out to be a loose lower throttle body boot clamp. Your case might be different and exhibit different (though similar) symptoms. But once the leak was found the motor runs smooth to red-line.
 

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How many miles now?
2000 km. The issue is here from the start, and hasn't changed a bit till now. But, at the beginning it was actually hardly noticeable as since the bike was new I was supposed to not rev it so high.

When my Givi engine guards were vibrating (before I realized it was an out-of-balance motor) I researched it and other riders complained about Givi guards being particularly noisy on the Gen2 V-Strom. The fix was to modify the bolt/clamp at the union by the front cylinders. Others added weights to the bars or installed bungie cords both of which would change the natural frequency so it would not be so annoying at a critical (usually cruising) RPM. To kill the vibrations you might need to devise a way to securely add some temp weights to the racks when you don't have the side cases on. It probably won't take much weight to move the resonance frequency off the annoying RPM.
I tried adding weight and it definitely helps, but it does not move the frequency up or down. It rather smoothed them out, so the more weight you add, the less vibrations you can feel (but they are still there, just barely noticeable). I think that if you add more weight, it is harder for the vibrations to move racks or crash bars, and they don't vibrate that much. But, I ended up with something like on the image below - added diving weights to the racks (2kg each side) and a water bottle to the crash bars :confused::confused::confused: Results: vibrations were almost unnoticeable. I mean, I was happy with the results.

Hmmm... was this demo bike completely stock (i.e. no racks or engine guards)? Also, I am not sure what the "locker below the seat" is. I thought I read about someone else with a Gen3 Wee who found the seat mount/latch was loose causing vibes, maybe that is Gen3 Wee issue?
Yes, completely stock - no racks or engine guards. I'm sending a photo of what I mean by the "locker below the seat". So, couple of days after getting the bike I was back at the dealers to report my vibrations, and we started to examine the bike. They confirmed that there are excessive vibrations around 4500 RPM, and at that RPM range this "locker below the seat" was ringing (vibrations + sound). Suzuki constructed it that way so there is a moving metal parts inside and they were just hitting each other causing a sound at certain RPM. They replaced mine with a new unit thinking it will help, but we examined a demo bike and it had exactly the same issue. I ended up removing the whole part, disassembling it, adding couple of layers of tape, and now metal parts don't hit each other and it works fine... Another material or solution used at the factory would prevent this issue from happening.

Another issue was with the passenger foot pegs. At 4500 RPM the foot peg pins started vibrating and you can see them moving around (they are not mounted tight, just loosely). So I ended up removing the pins and just using a normal screw. It was the same on the demo bike.

I think the Givi's will do that, they weren't properly tuned to the bike and can be annoying. They were really bad when my motor was out-of-balance but now that I fixed that they are hardly noticeable but I can feel them resonating when I pass through 5K RPM.
I went with crash bar of another company (HEED), as I wanted a skid plate that mounts directly to the crash bars (Givi skid plate is mounted to the engine itself).

I don't know about this but its not a crazy thought as all those changes could have created an overall bike/motor/exhaust/frame resonance at 4500RPM. Resonance is hard to predict, also on my Gen2 the out-of-balance resonance is at 5200RPM so they could be a different issues. My experience was coming from a Gen1 to a Gen2, so their maybe some peculiarities with the Gen3 that I am not aware of but its the same basic motor and should run smooth to red-line.
My conclusion so far is (although I might be wrong as this is based only on my opinion, my bike and the demo bike):
1) The new generation is not a well though construction, it feels like the were cutting costs where possible, and not testing it fully. That's why some parts vibrate when the engine gets certain RPM (locker below the seat, exhaust, or foot pegs) - which was present on my bike and on the demo bike.
2) The third party companies producing crash bars, luggage racks etc don't test it fully with the bike, therefore resulting in vibrating parts OR it is just not possible to make a non-vibrating big crash bars and luggage racks on a new generation of the bike, as new updates resulted with unavoidable vibrations that are transferred to whatever you attach to the bike.
3) Different crash bars and different luggage racks may vibrate less or more. I have two sets of crash bars (RD Moto and HEED), and I can feel that HEED crash bars vibrate more. RD Moto crash bars don't vibrate at all. HEED bars are also bigger, have more parts and they are attached in more places. There is a chance that other luggage racks available for this bike may not vibrate so much because of a different construction or mounting points.
4) There is no easy solution to cure that kind of vibrations. I can either get used to them, add a lot of extra weight, or remove vibrating elements from the bike.
5) Those vibrations are quite subjective. Several people saw my bike and some of them could feel them immediately, others told that it's just fine.
 

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@Dwatracz

Without having a Gen3 and not doing any testing, I tend to agree with your assessment. It seems like the Gen3 has a vibe issue at 4500RPM which is unfortunate. The accessories appear to make it worse (i.e. more noticeable) but the seat latch (or whatever that thing is) and the peg pins vibrating on a stock bike are the telltale that the 4500RPM resonance is inherent in the design. My guess is the new exhaust design is probably the source but it would be difficult to modify/isolate the exhaust to get rid of it.

To be clear (so people don't chase their tails trying to fix a phantom TB leak on the Gen3) the Gen2 engine vibe at 5200RPM, at least on my bike, was due to a loose lower throttle body boot. I suppose this could also happen on the Gen3 but you would know it for sure and the symptoms are much more severe and are different than the vibes at 4500RPM on the Gen3 that you describe.
 

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@dmfdmf

Yesterday I found a video on YouTube
showing installing the exact same luggage rack as I have, so I contacted this guy over facebook and we talked a little about vibrations. He was very friendly and reported no vibrations on his bike with this setup (exactly the same as mine), and he was very surprised that I have some strange vibrations with those racks. I guess we are back at square 1 :confused::confused::confused:
 

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@Dwatracz

I see spoked wheels in the video which (I think) means he has the XT/Adventure model, what model do you have? Maybe there are physical differences or beefed up components on the XT model that reduces the vibrations which would be consistent with your hypothesis that Suzuki cut some corners on the base model. Pure speculation on my part but it might be worth comparing models side-by-side and check the specs to rule it out.
 

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@Dwatracz

I see spoked wheels in the video which (I think) means he has the XT/Adventure model, what model do you have? Maybe there are physical differences or beefed up components on the XT model that reduces the vibrations which would be consistent with your hypothesis that Suzuki cut some corners on the base model. Pure speculation on my part but it might be worth comparing models side-by-side and check the specs to rule it out.
I also have an XT model with spoked wheels. It's 2018 model. Too bad I can't compare my bike with another person that has exact same setup and reports no issues with vibrations.
 

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Same vibrations here, 650XT 2017 model. Part of my experience is described in this thread.
I went to the dealer (sole representative for Greece) and asked them to check the torque on the (Suzuki original) crashbars, which at that point I suspected them to be responsible for the vibrations.
After a lengthy prologue on servicing Suzuki motorcycles for 25 years they admitted that they had no torque wrench available (once again, this was 1 of the 2 main service points of the sole Suzuki representative in Greece).
They told me that the vibrations were "normal" for a V2 engine. They didn't check something on the bike, apart from checking that the crashbar bolts were sufficiently tight.
I couldn't agree more that the fact that the vibrations start at 4500-4700RPM ruins the riding experience.
I am trying to find a skilled/experienced V-Strom mechanic to find out if this can be solved or if I have to live with it.
 

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Same vibrations here, 650XT 2017 model. Part of my experience is described in this thread.
I went to the dealer (sole representative for Greece) and asked them to check the torque on the (Suzuki original) crashbars, which at that point I suspected them to be responsible for the vibrations.
After a lengthy prologue on servicing Suzuki motorcycles for 25 years they admitted that they had no torque wrench available (once again, this was 1 of the 2 main service points of the sole Suzuki representative in Greece).
They told me that the vibrations were "normal" for a V2 engine. They didn't check something on the bike, apart from checking that the crashbar bolts were sufficiently tight.
I couldn't agree more that the fact that the vibrations start at 4500-4700RPM ruins the riding experience.
I am trying to find a skilled/experienced V-Strom mechanic to find out if this can be solved or if I have to live with it.
I don't think so. I already visited 2 Suzuki services and 3 other services and no solution so far. They didn't find anything wrong with the bike, or the luggage rack, and told me that I have to get used to this. We re-installed the racks 4 times already, and it didn't change anything.

I tested several other DL 650 bikes (all generations) and in all of them there seems to be increased engine noise around 4500 - 5000 RPM. There is an identical engine noise in all models in that RPM range. In 2017 / 2018 model when you hear that noise around 4500 - 5000 RPM, it gets transfered as vibrations to other parts of the bike - in our case it's the Givi PL3112 rack.

However, I saw one DL 650 2017 with a different luggage rack. Not sure what brand. I sat on the bike when it was running and I can confirm that I felt less vibrations on the seat in that RPM range. They were still there, but definitely less than on my bike with Givi PL3112 rack. I would have to ride it to do some test but I was not allowed to. If you can find someone in your area with this bike and ANY luggage racks - you should try to contact and test it. Some people may not feel that vibrations to be honest, they just don't care, or it's very subjective.

I think that the only option at this point is to try different luggage rack - for example Givi Monokey, or Sw-Motech (which you can detach from the bike easily), - it also looks heavier, so it may vibrate less. Or maybe Hepco & Becker.
 

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For those chasing the cause of vibrations I reseated and retorqued my motor mounts and posted it to the How-To maintenance forum. Motor Mount Reseat & ReTorque. This is for a Gen2 Wee but the procedure should be essentially the same for the Gen3. The procedure did make the bike less viby but the bike still has a shudder around 2-3K RPM and buzziness at 7-8K RPM so I am still looking for a cause. I think it either has to be an imbalance between the power of the F/R cylinders or perhaps an unbalanced clutch pack.

Here are my next steps I am going to try.

  1. Compression or Leak Down Test: The bike currently has 7500 miles and I bought it with 3K miles back in April. It was buzzy at 5200 RPM when I got it which turned out to be a loose lower throttle body boot clamp. I just did a valve adjust and the front exhausts were at the limit already at 7.5K miles which was a bit of a surprise. So I am thinking that maybe the leaking air damaged the front cylinder in some way such that the compression is different enough between the cylinders to cause vibration, hence the compression check.
  2. Fuel Pump Inlet Filter and HP Filter Bypass: The fuel pump inlet sock filter was plugged up with crap from a local gas station that I no longer use. Previously I rinsed the inlet sock filter with kerosene, reinstalled it and all was fine but the whining noise has returned so I need to check it again. I might replace the inlet sock with a new filter and do the external high pressure filter mod to fix this problem. I put this on the list because if the flow or pressure of the fuel pump is low it might cause motor imbalance (I don't think so but want to rule it out and I need to fix it anyway before the pump goes bad and leaves me stranded).
  3. Clean Injectors: This 4 year old bike had 3000 miles when I bought it used in April. That is an average of only 750miles/year and this is California and we ride year round so a bit odd. The seller sold the bike because he has some health issue that prevented him from riding. So maybe he only rode 2000, 800, 200, 0, miles in those four years so the bike was hardly used and sat around a lot in the last two years and the injectors got plugged up. I may pull them and ship them to R.C. Engineering for cleaning.
  4. Throttle Body Sync (primary plates, not idle air screw): My K7 Wee was really smooth after I synced the throttle body primary plates using light beams. That is last on my list because it is a bit of a pain to do and I'd like to think throttle bodies from Suzuki don't ship out-of-sync but I have my doubts.
  5. Inspect/Rebuild the clutch: This is a long shot but I might do it if I have to.
 

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Hi, Everyone:

I'll add my two cents to VTWEE's comments. Both of our bikes went back to the dealer for the vibe issue (at and around 5K) and both dealers eventually worked on the throttle bodies. My paperwork said they did a sync as well as checked the throttle valve position sensor (which was slightly out of limits and adjusted). I actually had the Suzuki rep.' on hand when I brought my bike in for the issue the second time and he rode the bike for quite a while. He seemed knowledgeable, was kind and his synopsis was that there was nothing wrong with the bike. I get vibes in the seat, pegs, tank, case, handlebars, basically everywhere right at the 5-5,200 range. Right about where you want to be on the highway cruising. Maybe I am missing something or expecting too much but I showed the rep.' review after review about how smooth this bike was: "No vibration at all in the pegs or bars until around 7K / 80MPH" (I think that one was from Cycle World). I know it's apples to oranges but I just sold a 2013 CB500F and that bike was unbelievably smooth at or above 80MPH on the highway and at a much higher RPM, obviously. I also explained to the rep.' how I didn't feel that much vibration in the demo bike and he mentioned break-in. He said that a year from now I'll be happy with the bike. He also said it could be high ethanol levels in the fuel and to try ethanol free fuel (have no idea, but I would think those stations aren't around every corner). The bike did seem marginally better after the sync / TPS adjustment. I'm not even sure where I want to go with it at this point but I'm not happy. If anyone is interested in a 600-mile 2017 (fresh 600-mile service) with hard bags and some farkles I'd be willing to let it go for what I have in it.

Glad VTWEE is feeling better and I believe he is headed for a Triumph Tiger....

Ross
I am thinking what you are feeling is pretty normal on the DL650... especially after hearing that you owned a CB500F.

I had a 2009 DL650 that I put about 65,000 miles on the bike. A friend of mine picked up a CB500X a few months before I sold my DL650 and I rode it around for a bit and that thing was SMOOTH!!! Smoother than my DL650 and a few Triumph Tiger 800s that I had ridden. I decided to take the plunge and I bought a used CB500X and installed the Rally Raid Stage 3 kit on the bike. Overall that bike was much smoother than my DL or just about any other bike (with the possible exception of my old VFR750) that I had owned or ridden. The only vibration I got on the CB500X was when I was north of 80mph and then I would get some buzziness in the handlebars but some of that may have been due to the TKC80s that I had on the bike.

I eventually sold the CB500X and picked up a new 2018 DL650XT. There is a spot between 5000 and 6000 RPM that things buzz a bit more but I seldom stay at that RPM when I am riding. I think I have more vibration on the pegs and passenger pegs on the 2018 than I did on my 2009 but I attribute that to the redesign of the subframe and new muffler position. Definitely not as smooth as my CB500X but in the same league as my 2009.
 

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Australia 2018 model.
G'day.
Absolutely agree with chain slack comments - chain wear accelerated at around 1000 mile (1600km) mark from new, so kind of surprised me how it got to 45mm pretty quickly. Coincides with riding much harder after wear-in period too, changing gears harder, etc...
Vibrations were under load - almost a rattling drone sound type with the vibration. I even thought it was the muffler heat guard plate. Opening throttle in a too-big gear made it worse.
Had noticed jerkiness at low speed.
Adjusted chain at tight spot to 25mm (1 inch) and got a new bike back - instantly. Also thorough de-grease and wash / relube of original OEM tacky lubricant remaining on chain. I am a B1.1 Licenced Aircraft Engineer if that means something to anyone, so I use kero (Jet A-1) to clean the chain. Trust me - it is perfect, even normal commercial kerosine, then washed with high-pressure water.
Also noticed overall noise reflected back from cars or motorway walls had been almost eliminated completely.
Short story, get that tar-pit lube off, use a proper road-type lube like MOTUL road race factory line, and keep the chain line tension sweet.
Regards, Andy
 

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This thread was an interesting read! I have a DL650 AK7 with similar vibrations. I'll check the chain tension tonight, I think it might be a bit loose. I'm also going to measure the chain length over 21 links, just to be sure it's still ok.

I might have a look at the TB boot clamps as well.
 

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The chain length seems ok.

However, after testing a bit more, I found that the vibrations are there even if I stand still with the clutch pulled or with the gear in neutral. When riding, I usually notice the vibrations when over 4000 rpm. Really noticable at 5000 and really annoying at 6000 rpm.

I now found that if I stand still and rev the engine, I can actually feel the vibrations at 3000 rpm. Going past 6000 rpm just seems to increase the vibrations.

Also, I suddenly remembered that when I replaced the spark plugs last year, I also replaced one of the spark plug boots with a new (Suzuki OEM) one because it wouldn't sit snugly on the spark plug. This got me thinking. If one of the spark plugs is not firing as it should, could this be the cause of vibrations?

If so, how can I check that they all work? I know how to check spark plugs on one cylinder engines, but there are four spark plugs on my V-strom. Should I just remove one at a time and try starting it while checking for a spark? Is this doable? Also, they are not easily accessible (need to lift the tank, etc). Is there an easier way?
 

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Good News, Bad News

I've been hunting the cause of vibration issues with my Gen2 DL650A since I bought it in April of last year. I found a loose (i.e. leaky) lower throttle body boot which was a major source of vibes but after fixing that, re-torquing motor-mounts and fiddling with the throttle bodies an annoying low RPM shudder and vibes at ~7K RPM remained. Before tackling other possible causes I tested the compression today and found that the F/R delta is 20 PSI (215 -vs- 235 PSI well within spec) whereas the delta spec is 28PSI. I don't think the 28 PSI is a technical limit but legal/warranty limit before Suzuki would do anything about it. My previous K7 Wee had ~200 PSI F/R (delta = 0) and was smooth as silk all the way to redline.

So the good news is that I think I found the source of my motor imbalance but now I am looking at top end work to resolve this. My concern is that the loose lower throttle body boot (probably came that way from the factory because according to the seller it was always viby) ran the front cylinder lean and fried a valve or valve seat. I didn't catch it till 4K miles. Ugh.
 
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Does anyone have any updates on this issue?

I have a 2020 650xt that I am struggling with vibrations. I spoke to my dealer last year when it was new and they said that it was fine when they looked it over. I had some givi engine bars on it and it was unbearable to ride over about 4.5k rpms, so I ended up removing the bars. Currently the bike has 7000km on it and I checked for a vacuum leak but all the boots looked alright to me. The motor mounts all seem to be in spec too for tightness, but I am planning on checking the thrust adjusters torque next week. I am not sure if this is the problem since I did ask the dealer to have their mechanic check the torque of them last year, although I do wonder if they did actually check them.
 

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See post #73 above. Your chain cleanliness can have a definite impact on vibrations.

My sprocket was getting pretty dirty, so I decided to do a thorough cleaning of my chain and use a new type of lube. The next time I rode the Strom, I noticed that my annoying 5000 rpm vibration was gone. This vibe had bugged me since new.

After reading post #73, for good measure I plan to also check the chain tension as well...
 

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I've never checked the front sprocket, but the rear and the chain are usually kept clean and well lubed. I will try and check out the front sprocket next week (as long as I have the time) when I check the thrust adjuster torque. I also set the tension closer to the 38mm mark since I've read here that the book spec is a little tight.
 

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G’day all. My 2019 XT 650 is doing the same. The first owner, who I bought it from had fitted Grip Puppies to the handgrips. That probably means the issue has been there for a while. Being an XT the crash bars were standard so I don’t know whether they differ from Givi bars or not. When riding and I touch the left bar, the vibe is very pronounced around the 4,750 - 5,000rpm mark. It is still there at a higher frequency at higher revs but the harmonic vibe is worse at that rev range.
A mate who has a CB500X has mentioned the same problem on their forums and said some have relieved or cured the problem by loosening the mounting bolts for the crash bars and progressively tightening them to the required torque.
Apparently, the problem can be made worse by fully tensioning one side and trying to sort the other side individually.….
It must be done gradually and equally, each side in sequence.
I will have a crack at this, this afternoon and report back here as to how i went.
 
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