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Discussion Starter #1
Dear strommers,

Can you all give a look with your wise eyes and tell me if this chain looks properly riveted. I followed all instructions from this site for my chain and sprocket install including modified torque settings recommended by greywolf and others which was much appreciated. However, this was my first rivet type master link and I want to be certain that it is good to go. I've only use clip style previously.

Thanks for looking!:mrgreen:

Chain is a DID VX525
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The tool I bought has a sort of built In stop on the riveting pin so I felt pretty good about it. However it is nice to get a second opinion. Thanks.
 

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I was nervous about pinching the link too tight, so I measured the factory link with calipers compared to the my installed link... spot on the first attempt. I measured again after a couple tanks of fuel, it hadn't moved. I'm happy now.

Being slightly obsessive, I use it as a reference when lubing the chain. Start applying at master link and stop when it comes by again. It ensures all the chain is lubed and gives me a visual check of the link every couple tanks of fuel.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Looks good from that angle. Three possible errors--
--Squeeze the side plate on too much and over-squeeze the o-rings
--Don't expand the rivet head enough
--Expand the rivet head too much. (your rivet heads look good)

 

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Discussion Starter #8
I measured the master link plates for tighteness by rotating the chain tool press plates over the neighboring links and it just brushed them so the tightness should be fine as it matches the other links. No kinking or anything so I feel that part is good. But like the other strommer said it was a bit nerve wracking!

For the record I used the Cycle Gear Stockton Tool Company chain tool and it worked well. They had it on sale for $29 bucks and the new instructions (old instructions were garbage and had many complaints) are very nice with color illustrations and all which made the process a bit easier.

I re-vived another thread about the chain adjusting process. It's not very intuitive so I hope I got it right. I'm too used to working on dirtbikes I guess with the easy chain and sprocket swaps. :confused:
 

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I was nervous about pinching the link too tight, so I measured the factory link with calipers compared to the my installed link... spot on the first attempt. I measured again after a couple tanks of fuel, it hadn't moved. I'm happy now.

Being slightly obsessive, I use it as a reference when lubing the chain. Start applying at master link and stop when it comes by again. It ensures all the chain is lubed and gives me a visual check of the link every couple tanks of fuel.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
I paint the master link red so I can spot it easier using it as a reference point when cleaning and lubing.
 

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Looks good from that angle. Three possible errors--
--Squeeze the side plate on too much and over-squeeze the o-rings
--Don't expand the rivet head enough
--Expand the rivet head too much. (your rivet heads look good)

I did 1 and 3 with my first rivet link in the late 90's. Easy enough to correct step 1 before step 3, but mashing that one up...time to get another master link and start over!
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The tool I bought has a sort of built In stop on the riveting pin so I felt pretty good about it. However it is nice to get a second opinion. Thanks.
That's the best type of chain tool IMHO. It prevents excessive spreading. I have a DID clone. The die in the channel has two faces. One side pushes on the side plate until it meets the pins, insuring that plate goes on the correct amount. The other side has a dimple in a crater. Rather than just spreading the rivet, the rivet is pressed into the die face so it can't be overdone.

 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Just curious but why do you not use the clip style link?
There is a tiny chance a clip type can fail, especially if it is the type with a side plate that can be slipped on without a tool. It is the weakest link in the chain. A riveted master link requiring a pressed on side plate is as strong as the rest of the chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
That's the best type of chain tool IMHO. It prevents excessive spreading. I have a DID clone. The die in the channel has two faces. One side pushes on the side plate until it meets the pins, insuring that plate goes on the correct amount. The other side has a dimple in a crater. Rather than just spreading the rivet, the rivet is pressed into the die face so it can't be overdone.

I will say that my tool doesn't do a very good of keeping everything lined up while I press the plates on. The tool naturally tries to spin the pressing plate as it pushes on the top of the master link so it gets cockeyed and if you aren't careful the pins will have nowhere to go as the link gets pressed together. I had to incrementally press then adjust so that the pins could travel through the plate that was being pressed on. Just a minor headache but worth mentioning. I do like that the stockton kit is able to be used on other chains as well. I believe it said it can do cam chains, etc.
 

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Newby to chains

So, I have a 2012 Wee with approx 21,000 kms. Question? When do I need to replace the chain? ...sprockets? (front/back)
Other than an Enduro I had many moons ago, I've only had shaft drive bikes.
And I sold the Enduro before replacing the chain.
Thanks guys...great thread!
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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When do I need to replace the chain? ...sprockets? (front/back)
When is the chain shot?

I like to change sprockets with the chain. Some people change the front sprocket more often than the chain and others change the chain more often than the rear sprocket. Watch for asymmetrical sprocket teeth. They will eat chains in a hurry.
 
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