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Inuvik Trip

Friday Jun 9 2017, Delta BC to Prince George BC

Sunny day, drove up Fraser Canyon (Hwy #1) which is always amazing. Through the 7 tunnels and out into the desert, it is an amazing transition and highly recommended. I have been up this route too many times to bother taking many pictures.

Clouds started to build going up the Canyon.



Bike is running good, doesn't feel too heavy even though I know the back end is overloaded. Still getting used to the Anakee Wild tires. I have never ridden knobbies before and wasn't too confident with them at this point. Later in the ride I felt confident with them, even in rain they stuck well.

The only place I did not like the Wild tires were on those metal bridges, and only some of them. The ones that have a kind of X pattern were not a problem, but the ones with the straight wire lines had me squirming as the bike is moving a half inch left and right, and this feels like a foot of motion when riding, disturbing and I never got used to it.

The other area where the Wild tires sucked was after the ride, around 6000km, maybe a little more and the rear tire is pretty much done. Not too impressive considering the cost of these tires. I do not need knobbies for my normal riding anyways. The front Wild tire still looks great.

I stopped in Lac La Hache Campsite as the sky was looking dicey ahead, lots of dark clouds, but inside that campsite it was nearly empty and they have this reservation system where you need to check with the custodian if you did not reserve something so he can tell you which sites are available, which throws me off, so I continued up the road. I stayed in another Provincial campground (Twin Lakes), but this one had tags showing which sites were available at each pad, so I could just pick one and go pay for it.

It was dry when I set up, but it rained all night, I should have stayed in Lac La Hache. This campsite said it had showers, but searching in the morning revealed it did not, they were building a new shower building and it was not ready. They didn't have issue charging $25 for the night though, and had already added "showers" to their signs coming in, so rather misleading.

Not wanting to pack my wet tent fly in my bag the next morning, I folded it up and stuffed it under the cargo net on the back, and this worked out great and I ended up doing that the rest of the trip, wet or dry. It makes putting the tent back in its sack way easier too.


Day 2, on the road to Francios Lake.

I had a hard time deciding whether to go North or West when I got to Prince George, the Weather looked good West, but not particularly warm, with some chance of Snow in Stewart BC forecast. North was a crapshoot, so I went West. Followed my GPS plan.

I took 35 South at Burns Lake, toward Francois Lake. It was paved most of the way, with little traffic, and the last part was dirt and gravel roads, in good shape and easy to ride.





I thought about a stealth camp and started looking for places, but each pullout I stopped at had fresh bear poop. I am not interested in bear encounters so kept looking and eventually found a spot in an old clearcut section that had no noticeable bear poop, mostly a big empty field, so I set up the tent quite far from the bike where I have all my food, and did not eat anything before bed.









It is funny how camping in bear country changes my habit. Not wanting anything attractive to bears on me in the tent, I often skip dinner and do not even brush teeth until the morning. I just setup tent, crawl in, and go to sleep.

No bear encounters that I am aware of, slept like a log. Bike was still upright in the morning. There were many birds outside the tent in the morning, flying overhead and perching on nearby bushes etc. I think they were curious about me. Pretty much up with the sun out here, it was a little chilly, around 4c from what I remember, which can be a good thing since it means there are almost zero bugs.


Day 3, the road to Stewart.

An uneventful ride up Hwy 37 except for a baby moose that I noticed running down the highway toward me, so I stopped and watched and he came almost right up to me before freaking out about the sound of the bike and turning off into the bushes. No idea what had spooked him to run like that, but I could only hope his mom was OK up the road someplace. I did not see any dead moose further up so can only imagine what happened to her, if anything. Maybe they get together for tea and a laugh later? imagine what you like.

The road into Stewart was just as everyone mentioned, fun to ride, beautiful views, lots of mountains. I got in to town around 4pm and stayed at the King George Motel, which was pretty nice actually. Right downtown. I was kind of tired so layed on the bed and closed my eyes, then I started to think about the weather and pulled it up on my phone. Stewart is pretty dicey for weather, if it's nice you need to take advantage of it, since it doesn't last long. Sure enough, forecast was for rain starting that evening at 10pm and rain the next few days, so if I wanted to see the Salmon Glacier, it had to be today.













I pulled all the bags off the bike and headed out to see it. Into Hyder AK, and then it weaves through some mountains and back into BC where the Glacier is.

The road up wasn't too bad, some pot holes and loose gravel but no issues with a nice light bike.

I wanted to get right to the top, but part of the road was closed





I thought about going around that road closed sign, there was space there, but I was pretty much the last guy on the mountain so didn't take the risk. There were plenty of spots on the way up where the road could have been closed, snow, rocks, all kinds of places waiting to fall over that road.

It started to rain as I was coming back, just a sprinkle, but it was building.

I did not stop at the Grizzly overlook on the way down. There were a couple of people there, but I was tired and seeing grizzlies was not high on my list (have seen them many times).

I had a good sleep that night, it is nice to have a shower and rest in a real bed once in a while.

The next morning it was broken clouds, not raining as predicted, and 11c instead of the 1c that was predicted. There were some clouds around but no heavy rain.




Day 4, Telegraph Creek

The weather was cooperating when I got up to Dease Lake, so I gassed up and headed down the road to Telegraph Creek. This is another ride you have to do during good weather. It was only 112km of dirt road, but some challenging spots in there, and a few 20 deg hills where I discovered having non switchable ABS is not a good thing on an overloaded bike, but I did not go off any cliffs or fall over, although it was close a few times. A little unnerving.



















Coming back up, on one of the 20 deg hills, a car came around the corner and I had to get over to the side quickly without falling off the cliff, stalling the bike or falling over in the deep gravel. A little nerve racking for sure. I was very happy to be back on pavement after that ride.

A spooky story to tell here. There are signs in this area about this being the Highway of Tears, where many women, mostly native indian, have gone missing over the years, and no trace has been found. Apparently they were hitchhikers mostly, anyways as I was driving up Telegraph Creek road, I passed a sign saying "Cariboo Camping". There had been signs all up and down that road saying beware of Livestock, and lots of poo paddies, non bear kind, on the side of the road in spots. I never saw any animals, but the evidence was there.

As I was driving past that sign I thought, I wonder if they would let me toss my tent up in here.. Cariboo Camping could mean it is some kind of camp site right? so I did a U-turn and went back and drove up a driveway that went to three houses. One of the houses on the left had a chain going through the door, I guessed it was some kind of garage, the second house had a white door on the front, a big propane tank at then entrance, a few pots for plants. It looked like the main house, but nobody came out to say hello. I walked in a bit and could see a large open field, no animals, but lots of places to camp if permission was given. As I was standing there I heard a click from the front door of the main house so I said Hello, but nobody opened the door. I envisioned some native woman inside thinking I am some scary guy, so OK, I guess this is not a camping place, so I started walking back to the bike when I heard chains rattling inside that other shed with the chain through the door and the hair on the back of my neck went up and I scooted out of there quickly.

I had this vision of some crazy axe murderer with people chained up inside that shed. Of course the idea is ridiculous, so I didn't report it to anyone.

That night I stayed at a Mormon campsite South of Dease Lake. It had nothing for facilities, but only cost $10 so I was happy. Helps offset my costs for Hotels.
 

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Day 5, Whitehorse YT

I had gassed up the bike the night before, so was all set to get out early. It was cool this morning, around 1.5c and the frost warning light was on. I needed to use the washroom so stopped at the first Rest Stop North of Dease Lake and after doing my thing I was preparing to get on the bike when a lady came around the corner on a pedal bike. She recognized me from the gas station the evening before and told me her problem with her car, she had a flat tire and no spare.

She had been given the car from a family friend and was told there was no spare. I asked her if she was sure and she didn't seem too convinced, so I went back with her to have a look.

She had the car pulled off in the grass where she had spent the night fretting about what to do, it being the highway of tears and all. Luckily she had her pedal bike strapped on the back and she found me to help right away. If I had not stopped at that Rest stop her day would have been a lot longer.

She had a brand new tire in the wheel well in the back and we found her jack and tire wrench in a side compartment, also found a first aid kit she didn't know she had.

We made an attempt to jack the car on the grass, but that was a waste of time, finally had her drive it up on the road and we got her wheel swapped out. She was very happy about that, and we said our goodbyes as she headed off to the tire repair place in Dease Lake. Her tire was destroyed as she had driven on it a ways with it flat, but hopefully the guy has some old tire he can give her to replace it as a spare.

She was on her way to Alaska to work for the Summer. Hopefully that tire repair place isn't the axe murderer guy who lives at "Cariboo Camping". ;)

The drive up 37 was gorgeous as always. Saw a porcupine cross the road, a few bears too. I did not see any mountain goats this trip. I ran into a couple of adventure guys in a Restaurant on the way up. They were going up to Inuvik too and suggested I stay at the same campsite that evening and maybe we can all go up together, so they provided the campsite name, it was right in downtown Whitehorse, along the river and included showers. That sounded nice.

As I got close to Whitehorse it started to rain and I could see rainclouds over the city, but East of there it was still broken clouds with some sunshine, so I opted to stay at a campsite outside town. Yukon camping is so cheap at $12. I never did see those other two guys again, I hope they did OK on their trip.













Day 6, Dawson City

The ride up to Dawson was paved, but the road was a little rough in spots, and you had to watch out for the dips, some of them could send you flying if you hit them unexpectedly. Someone told me about an accident caused from this recently. I could see that on a cruiser where you have no option but to sit on the seat, it could be quite the shock suddenly finding your ass flying over the handlebars.

I pulled into the Bunk House in town. I wanted to be close enough to the town to walk around, have a few beers etc. They had one room available for $130 with its own shower and a double bed, perfect.

When I got outside to move my stuff in, a couple other bikers road in. One of them was tagging along with another fellow (Tom) he had met along the road, and they asked me if my room had an extra bunk. I had looked at it earlier and sure enough it had the double bed, plus a single bed off in another section. Tom was interested in renting it, so we worked out a deal and he paid me right away. Nice, saving a few more bucks.

Tom and I went out for some food after, and did a tour around the town looking at some old houses from famous writers of the past like Jack London and Robert W. Service. Later Tom went to the Downtown Hotel to have a Sourtoe Cocktail (a Whiskey with a real human mummified toe in the bottom), pretty gross actually, but they had quite a line of people queuing for it, and this was not even D2D yet (a few days early), I can only imagine the lineup for that event.

Dawson City was a great place to visit, I would recommend it, it was a highlight of the trip for me. I bought some wonderful jewelry for the wife and kids at a custom place along the main road called Gold Trail Jewelers, where they do creative things with gold nuggets and I picked up some earrings and a necklace. The main jeweler there could transform anything you wanted, for instance my daughter will only wear studs, so he converted a hanging earring set to studs in 10 minutes. Very friendly people too, check it out when in town.









Tom doing the "toe". Pretty disgusting really. ;)



Day 7, Dempster Highway

I slept well that night and got up around 5:30am to get started on my Dempster run. Tom wanted to do it too, but he had to source out a new rear tire still, he rode in on a KTM with tubed tires, and his rear was nearly out of tread. He did not want to spend all his time changing tubes on that road.

The gas station at the entrance to the Dempster is odd. I has one pump for Gasoline, but there are two bays for that one hose, and in order to fill up, you need to go into the building next door, insert your CC and it will then tell you it is OK to use the pump, but anyone else can lift it at that point and start filling up with your CC as payment.

It accepted my CC (Mastercard) and told me to use Pump #1, so I went out to fill up, flipped the lever on the pump and tried to pump gas, but nothing came out. I tried it twice and nothing would dispense. Another guy came and his wife went in to try and it worked first time for them, they did exactly the same thing that I did. Strange.

I tried a different CC then (Visa) and now it worked fine.

My tires were both around 29 lbs on the ride up. It started out with gravel, fairly deep and not too much fun, but further up it changed to a harder surface with more embedded tracks, and later into a dirt gravel kind of mix which was perfect.

The Dempster winds through a series of canyons, and then you climb up into the mountains and follow along the top of a mountain all the way to Eagle Plains. The road up at the top was VERY bumpy with lots of embedded rocks. The side of the road was a light dust, kind of like talcum powder, and very slippery, so I stayed away from that and rode the rocks. It rattled the crap out of me and the bike, and by the time I got to Eagle Plains I discovered one of my fork seals had blown and one side of the brake was covered in oil, lovely.

I spent many months preparing the bike for this trip, but did not think to bring fork seals with me.

The mechanic in Eagle Plains told me they don't work on bikes, mostly just tires, but he didn't think I would have issues with one blown seal, the other can compensate, but I spoke with another rider who told me that usually when one side goes, the other goes shortly after. Not wanting to be stuck up here, I made the decision to turn around.

I had a chicken burger in the restaurant there, then setup my tent for the evening. Camping up here cost $20, but includes a shower, so that wasn't a bad deal. Really needed a shower after 370km of Dempster dust. It was warm and Sunny up there, and lots of bugs. At first I setup my tent in the bushes, but quickly moved out of there to a flat plain area where the wind was blowing and that helped keep the bugs off me.







This is David, a UK traveler who flew his bike to Calgary and was on his first month of a 5 month trip. He was planning to do the Arctic Circle, then head back out and go up to Yellowknife NWT via Hwy 77. I am sure he will do well.



Eagle Plains





Don't you wish you could just START your journey right on this spot?



Or this one







Blown seal, oil covered brake pad




Day 8, Dempster camping

The ride down the Dempster was interesting. I had two near crashes going back. One was caused by a pickup truck flying past me that I was not expecting. I was standing on pegs going through a deep gravel section, being sure to stay in the track. I cannot see what is behind me when standing up, perhaps there is a trick to this, not sure, but suddenly there was a pickup flying past me, and he left a whiteout of dust behind him and I was quickly enveloped in it, lost site of the road, and the front tire went into the deep gravel. The front went this way, the back went that way, then it reversed and I was drifting back and forth trying to get control of it, and it nearly had me, but suddenly the wheels just straightened out and all was OK. Scary stuff. I never had a tank slapper, so I think the stabilizer did it's job just fine.

The second one was my own fault, target fixation. I was following another track and noticed the deep gravel on the side and the bike just went right into it. Same thing with the crazy control issues, but it worked itself out after the bike got to a certain speed. I kicked myself for that one. Watch out for that deep gravel.

I stayed at Tombstone campsite that night because it looked like rain further up, and doing the Dempster in rain was not high on my list.
 

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Day 9, Whitehorse and beyond.

I was up at 3:30am and on the Dempster by 4am. Saw my first and only Grizzly there on the side of the road.



I guess he was looking for some of those rabbits I had seen all the way up the Dempster. They must make a good snack in between crashed biker meals.

It was glorious to hit pavement again and I could finally relax. That gravel really takes a toll on me, and standing up frequently is tiring, but mostly it is just the concentration that is needed to control the bike the whole way.

I filled up at the gas station at the entrance again, Visa worked right away.

The ride to Whitehorse was good except I was worried about that blown fork seal, somehow expecting the bike to lurch into the ditch at any second or maybe into the front of a semi truck coming the other way, but I did not notice anything with the bike, it ran as it always did.

The second fork seal blew as predicted, before I got to Whitehorse. I went over a filled pothole that had re-collapsed and didn't notice it until it was too late, my guess is that was enough to blow the second one.

When I got to Whitehorse I went straight to the Suzuki "dealer" there. Listers was a large Motosports shop, lots of quads, lots of outboard motors and a few motorcycles around. I went around the back hoping to speak with a mechanic, but nobody was in the yard, and the repair area was also empty. It was a Saturday Afternoon though, maybe the mechanic doesn't work Saturdays or something.

I got into the front and there was one young guy behind the counter.

"I have a couple of blown fork seals, can you fix that?"

"Nope, we don't do repairs here, let me give you a phone number for someone that does".

"RPM Repairs, 335-4181"

I called the guy and it sounded like I woke him up. "Can you replace fork seals on a Motorcycle?", "Yes, I can do that, do you have the parts?", "umm.. no", "Oh well I don't carry parts, you need to bring me those".

I had left Listers by this time, trying to find a place to stay. I went to the Coast High Country Inn" where they wanted $210 a night. I got a corporate rate which brought it down to $148 and was prepared to spend the night here while I sorted this out, but the room would not be ready for another hour.

"Can I use your phone while I wait?", sure no problem.

I called Listers and got the phone number for the Suzuki dealer in Prince George. They did not have parts to fix this either, they would need to come from Vancouver or Toronto and would likely be 5 or 7 days. It being a Saturday afternoon, and all motorcycle shops are closed Sunday Monday, it probably would not ship until Tuesday, and that is assuming someone has the parts.

I asked the guy what happens if the fork oil runs completely out and he told me he has never seen one run completely empty, but he thought perhaps if it did, and you hit a large bump, something bad might happen, but he wasn't sure.

I wasn't going to spend a week in Whitehorse, there is no way. If it came to that, I would rent a panel van and toss the bike in the back, then drive home, or maybe find a shipper for the bike and fly home or something. Probably end up costing less.

I canceled the reservation at the hotel and hopped on the bike and just rode it home to Vancouver. There were no issues doing this, nothing happened with handling, steering or anything else. The only noticeable items were a slightly less front brake (both sides had oil on them now), and when I would stop the bike the front end made some strange creaky noises.

I checked the forks after riding a while to see if they were heating up but nope. Everything seemed solid and worked fine.

I continued down the road and ended up in a Motel a little ways past Teslin, it was one of those motel's used by highway crews. Very basic, but I had been riding through a downpour for the past few hours, so anything was OK with me at that point, and it was actually quite comfortable with hot showers. The other reason for stopping there is that I failed to fill up my tank in Teslin and this Motel was also a "Racetrack Gas" station, it also happened to have run out of gas for the day. Apparently they have a very small tank and run out frequently. Lovely.





































Off the Dempster




Day 10, to Fort St.John

I was up early and on the road by 5:30. There was another gas station down the road, not too far, and I had to hope they also had not run out of gas as my level was low. I arrived at the station about 6:15 and the pumps did not start until 7am. Nothing to do but wait.

While sitting there a lady rode in on a BMW. She had stayed in the same Motel last night and was also low on fuel. She asked me if I saw the crashed GS on the way down, but I had not, it must have been one of the bikers I had waved at going the other direction. She said it was one of those patch gravel sections and the GS was laying on it's side, only police there, no rider, so I suspect that guy was on his way to hospital, end of trip for him. Kind of makes you think, how quickly it can all change if you lose concentration for a second or just got unlucky.

Filled up and was back on the road again, further up there was a long section of gravel and that BMW lady flew past me like she was on pavement. I had to roll my eyes at that, the gravel was nice and flat, not like the Dempster, but still, you never know when that is going to change suddenly and you end up with gravel in your eye.

She ended up turning back further up the road, I guess she left something at the gas station and that was the last I saw of her.

It started out nice and sunny that morning, but as I got closer to Muncho Lake provincial park the rain started again, and then I slogged through all the mountains in the cold and rain. There was a very close snow line on the mountains here and temps went down to 2c. I am fairly sure I felt freezing rain hitting my helmet through this section.

They are doing a lot of repairs to the roads in that area too, so many miles of terrible gravel roads. I would NOT want to do those gravel roads on a cruiser where you cannot even stand on the pegs, that would suck. I passed a cruiser with Apes at one point and could only imagine what riding in gravel will be like with hands about head level and no way to stand, sounded scary to me. Maybe the guy would see the gravel and just turn around.

Once out of the mountains, the road toward Fort St.John is hellishly boring. Mind numbingly boring actually, and every time I ride this section I swear I will never do it again, but seeing Stone Mountain Provincial Park and Muncho Lake Provincial Park is definitely worth it, those are amazing areas to ride.

I made it almost to Fort St.John that night and found a campsite for $20, no showers again, but I had a spot on Grass that was nearly level and comfortable. It had a gate that was locked between 11pm and 7am so I was forced to sleep in a little.



Day 11, To Vancouver

The ride home was good, no crashes, no tickets, nothing to complain about. Bike ran fine, just as it always did, despite it's handicap with leaking fork seals. The temperature started going up South of Prince George and it was soon mid 20's and perfect for riding. This was one of the few times I was able to open the vents on my suit and take the heated jacket liner off. It was sunny and dry the rest of the way home.

I had been on the road a long time and it was starting to get dark as I rode down the Fraser Canyon toward Hope. I started noticing people flashing their headlights at me as it got darker and discovered the headlight I had swapped in before the trip was actually a highbeam, not a lowbeam. The only way to tell was that when I flipped on my highbeam, it didn't change anything, also the signs on the side of the road were glowing blindingly bright from my headlight.

Somehow I would have thought the light emitted came from the shell, not the bulb, but apparently not. So I was driving with illegal lights all this time. The other discovery is that my Aux lights are also casting way too much light since they are Flood lights, not Spot lights.

I stopped on the side of the road and got out some Gorilla tape, and taped my headlight to eliminate that blinding highbeam portion, and I also taped over the tops of the Aux lights to reduce that, and that was enough to get me home. I even drove past two police cars on the side of the road and was sure they were going to pull me over but they didn't seem to notice so I kept going.

I had brought my old H7 bulb, but did not want to mess with changing it on the side of the road unless forced, and it all worked out. So now I need to find a couple of Spot Aux lights and swap out this H7 once more. How can you tell if it is a lowbeam bulb?


Day 12, cleanup

I found one bolt missing on the bike after all of that, it was a bolt for a clamp holding the clutch hydraulic hose on and nothing major. I will get another bolt to fit if I do not already possess such a thing.

Bike was a mess and I spent many hours cleaning it, but it looks reasonable once again. I will need to sit down with a toothbrush to get it cleaner at this point, and still there will be dirt embedded in there forever.

I will arrange to have the bike in to swap out those fork seals. I would do it myself, but would like a pro to look at it in case some damage has occurred from riding it without oil for so long. It also needs the valves checked, new oil/filter and air filter, and there may be other things.
 

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Nice ride report - some memories for me doing the area by cage.

You might want to consider K60 Scout on the back. Much better mileage ( 20,000 + miles on some and very stable on gravel )

Great tires for a mix of pavement and gravel.
 

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Nice pics and dissertation. Thanks to ADV folk like you I can Arm Chair the experience.

K60 Scouts with 20K miles? I only got 5K miles and they felt squirmy and needed to be replaced.
 

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Just read through your whole report and enjoyed it. Thanks! I am envious of trips like this being I am 3000 miles on the right coast.

Outbackwack
 

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something up with your set up

The Heidenau K60 and K60 Scout tyres have earned an extremely good reputation as a true 50/50 dual sport tyre. A perfectly suited overland travel tyre; these tyres last longer than just about any comparable dual sport tyre, and do not get scary in the wet like many hard compound tyres do.

Click on the 'Additional Media' tab for detailed photos of each specific tyre.

Gabriel of Zen Overland, used a pair of these on his 60,000 mile 18 month RTW trip, clocking up an incredible total of over 20,000 miles on a single rear tyre!
This was on a Honda XR650L, ridden on the full range of surfaces. From smooth asphalt, to sharp loose rock, mud, sand and countless river crossings.
https://www.zenoverland.com/tyres_tubes/heidenau-k60-k60-scout.html

Matches my experience and a New England rider I spoke to who got 22k miles from a set. I don't know what Squirmy means but they have hard centre bar.

........


good report OP. Many memories and some very cool pics
 

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Wow simply stunning pics and write up, and I am pretty confident your seals are fine and not blown. Pull down the dust cover and clean up inside the seal, it's almost always grit which gets under the seal and causes a weep. Also did you have your tutoro oiler installed and working the entire trip?
 

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My bike is going in for service next week. They can check the seals then, but there was a lot of fluid coming out, not just a small weep, so it needs to be drained and refilled anyways.

I had the Tutoro nozzle before, not their oiler, but replaced it before the trip with the Chinese setup with the pull lever that dumps oil directly on chain instead of on sprocket. This worked well and all I needed to do was slow down to first gear, and pull the lever 2 or three times to lube the chain. I could do it without looking.

Strangely this setup did not get any oil on my rear wheel rim like I was getting when putting oil on sprocket via the nozzle. There is also no way to foul the nozzle with dirt or buildup since it touches nothing, seems like a more logical oiler IMO.
 

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My bike is going in for service next week. They can check the seals then, but there was a lot of fluid coming out, not just a small weep, so it needs to be drained and refilled anyways.

I had the Tutoro nozzle before, not their oiler, but replaced it before the trip with the Chinese setup with the pull lever that dumps oil directly on chain instead of on sprocket. This worked well and all I needed to do was slow down to first gear, and pull the lever 2 or three times to lube the chain. I could do it without looking.

Strangely this setup did not get any oil on my rear wheel rim like I was getting when putting oil on sprocket via the nozzle. There is also no way to foul the nozzle with dirt or buildup since it touches nothing, seems like a more logical oiler IMO.
Thanks for response, so far I really don't get any more oil on my wheel with the Tutoro than with spray lubes, I must have my delivery rates pretty good right now. I don't really see how the tip could clog up that easily, but I reckon I will find out soon enough. :smile2:
 

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Thanks for response, so far I really don't get any more oil on my wheel with the Tutoro than with spray lubes, I must have my delivery rates pretty good right now. I don't really see how the tip could clog up that easily, but I reckon I will find out soon enough. :smile2:
The Tutoro nozzle may be better than the Loobman, the Loobman was touching the sprocket on both sides, so it was scraping up the crap and plugging it. I never gave the Tutoro a fair trial, so maybe it won't clog since it is setup to be mm's away from touching. I did ask one guy how long his Tutoro nozzle lasted and he said it was about one year as it would eventually tip to one side and touch the sprocket and then be ground down. See how yours does. Changing out the nozzle isn't hard, just messy and a PITA.
 

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Y'all can see Bugzys photo's? All I see is this for every single one:
This is because Photobucket just changed their rules disallowing 3rd party viewing, unless you decide to pay them $400 usd/year. I am looking at other options now and will update the links to photos after. Sorry about that. Sucks for everyone using Photobucket, stay clear of it.
 

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That could have something to do with it, I'm at 1.1 GB right now. I only upload pics I want to post on forums, the rest stay on the computer or hard drives.
 

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That could have something to do with it, I'm at 1.1 GB right now. I only upload pics I want to post on forums, the rest stay on the computer or hard drives.


I have an old computer with Ubuntu Server installed on it and run my own blog. Any storage I use is on my own machine and only limited by how much drive space I have. All this cloud stuff is restrictive, so I got my own cloud.


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