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I had to pull my tank a while ago and since I had it off I decided to pull the cowling and radiator to change out the coolant and check the valve clearances. I bought my DL650AL4 with 3K miles back in April (now has 7.5K). The rear cylinder was fine with intake and exhaust at mid-range of the spec. The front intakes were also at mid-range but both exhaust valves were right at the limit so I had to adjust them. When I bought the bike the seller told me that the bike has always been a bit viby and that turned out to be a leaky lower throttle body boot (almost certainly shipped that way). Once I fixed that the bike ran great and I am glad that I checked the clearances but I have to wonder if the leaky TB boot caused the front exhausts to sink into the valve seats due to the front cylinder running lean. In any case, I set them at the wide limit so they should be fine for a long time.

Also, here is a tip for doing a valve adjust. The manual says to remove the cam chain tensioner bolt so you can get slack in the chain to remove the cams. That advice is not too bad on the front cylinder because the bolt is easy to access so reinstalling the bolt is fairly easy. The rear cylinder is another story because access to the cam chain tensioner bolt is very difficult due to the ABS being in the way. If you have enough ratchet extensions (probably close to around 2-3ft to clear the swing arm) there is a clean, direct shot to the bolt. However, if you remove it then getting the threads started is a real challenge and very frustrating. So the trick on the rear is not to remove the bolt but to back it out 10-11 full (360deg) turns so the bolt is loose (out about 1") but still engaged with the threads. You can then use the cam chain tensioner pawl-release trick (do a search) to get some slack in the chain and remove a cam without difficulty. When you are done with the valve adjust the cam chain tensioner bolt is already engaged and you can just tighten it to spec so you don't have to wrestle with getting the threads started or risk crossing them up.
 

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...I decided to ... check the valve clearances...

So the trick on the rear is not to remove the bolt but to back it out 10-11 full (360deg) turns so the bolt is loose (out about 1") but still engaged with the threads. You can then use the cam chain tensioner pawl-release trick (do a search) to get some slack in the chain and remove a cam without difficulty. When you are done with the valve adjust the cam chain tensioner bolt is already engaged and you can just tighten it to spec so you don't have to wrestle with getting the threads started or risk crossing them up.
Sounds like a great tip. Thanks very much.

My Wee turned over 39,800 miles on my way into work this morning, and I plan / hope to do a first (real) valve check and adjust at 40,000 miles - beginning this project in a week or two. Based on comments from others, I'd planned to remove the rear wheel (and maybe a rubber flap in front of the rear wheel), but now I think I'll at least take a good look a the "clean, direct shot" to which you refer, and maybe (probably) try your proposed method.

I'm casually searching for the right deal (proximity, etc.) for a 2014+ Vee, but that might or might not happen. Even if it does, I'd want to sell the Wee, and I'd want to feel good about its valve clearances, and be able to provide to the new owner good records of gap values (was / is) and shim values (was / is). Plus, I've done this once on my '07 Wee, and am sort-of excited to get to do it again.

Again, thanks. :smile2:
 

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Based on comments from others, I'd planned to remove the rear wheel (and maybe a rubber flap in front of the rear wheel), but now I think I'll at least take a good look a the "clean, direct shot" to which you refer, and maybe (probably) try your proposed method.
On my K7 Wee even with ABS I was able to reach the bolt without the socket universal joint that most people recommend but make it hard in my opinion, especially getting thread started on reinstall. It was a long way and I had to use all my extensions and borrow a 12" extension from a neighbor to get the wrench out past the rear tire so I could easily turn it but it does work, no removing tires or the flap or moving the ABS motor, etc. On my L4 Wee I haven't had to pull the cams yet but when I did the clearance check I wanted to see if the cam chain tensioner bolt was accessible like my K7. There is a clean, direct shot but the angle is lower so the socket wrench doesn't end up at the end of the swing arm but below it about 2/3 of the way so you don't need as many extensions.
 

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OK. Thanks for clarifying the process even further.

I'll keep your comments in mind as I start the process.

Thanks again, and happy Thanksgiving!
 

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I had the rear wheel off to put on a new chain and sprockets so it was pretty easy to get to that bolt. 30,000 miles and the exhausts were at the low end of good, intakes were in the middle of the range. We put the exhausts in the middle and will probably check them at 60,000 miles.


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I'm about to turn over 20,000 on my 15XT, it runs/starts so damn good.....I am debating/considering going even longer without the valve check.
 

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I'm about to turn over 20,000 on my 15XT, it runs/starts so damn good.....I am debating/considering going even longer without the valve check.

this is exactly where i am at...20k on my 16wee------maybe over winter i will get the motovation
where is everyone getting their angled feeler gauges?
 

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...where is everyone getting their angled feeler gauges?
I just use straight feelers and they work fine. You can probably get them from any auto parts store or online Amazon. I have a metric and english set of gauges and because of the offset between the two measurement systems I can get a slightly more accurate measure of the clearance. For instance, when I was recently measuring the intake gap the metric feeler that fit was 0.15mm but when I measured it with english feeler the 0.006" gauge fits which is actually 0.1524mm so I get a few more sig figs that way. If you aren't replacing the shims its probably not super critical but a more accurate measurement can allow you pick the best replacement shim to get the gap as close to your target as possible.

Also, here is a post of a shim calculation spreadsheet that you can download if you need to adjust the gap. Good Luck!
 

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I'm about to turn over 20,000 on my 15XT, it runs/starts so damn good.....I am debating/considering going even longer without the valve check.
There are no obvious symptoms of tight valves until the exhaust valves fry which is why checking is a maintenance item. If it has never been checked in 20K I'd check them sooner rather than later. My L4 Wee only had 7.5K miles and the front exhaust valves were at the limit. After break-in they don't really move much till end-of-life (100K+) so once you check you can safely extend the miles between checks. Hell, at 20K I'd plan on going in and set the intakes to mid-spec and the exhausts at wide-limit and ride it till 60-70K.
 

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I had the rear wheel off to put on a new chain and sprockets so it was pretty easy to get to that bolt. 30,000 miles and the exhausts were at the low end of good, intakes were in the middle of the range. We put the exhausts in the middle and will probably check them at 60,000 miles.


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Yea take the rear wheel off and its easy to get to the tensioner.
 

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After mulling it over a bit, and since it is suppose to rain off and on for two weeks (a very welcome respite from the smoke from wild fires) I decided to go ahead and move all the exhaust gaps to the wide end of the spec and leave the intakes alone.

Here are my before measurements;

Front:Ex: 0.2032L 0.2032R
Front:In: 0.1524L 0.1524R

Rear:In: 0.1524L 0.1524R
Rear:Ex: 0.2300L 0.2300R

Here are my estimated gaps after replacing shims (using the great spreadsheet by Warren);

Front:Ex: 0.3000L 0.2927R
Front:In: 0.1524L 0.1524R

Rear:In: 0.1524L 0.1524R
Rear:Ex: 0.3047L 0.2935R

I ordered shims from Rocky Mountain ATV which were spot-on when I mic'd them (not always the case with other suppliers) plus they have a 0.025 increment between 0.05 increments so I was able to get the exhausts right at the limit. The left, rear exhaust is a hair wider than the metric spec of 0.30 but if you convert the inch spec of 0.012" to mm you get 0.3048 so that will be fine. I don't want to touch these for a long time and my strategy is not to measure them till around 40K miles (if I even keep the bike that long). When I do measure them I will only measure the rear intakes which is very easy. Since the motor is out of break-in (when the gaps can move a lot) I think it is safe to assume the front intakes will wear at a similar rate as the rears thus avoiding the disassembly to measure the front cylinder until I have to do an adjustment. It is also unlikely the exhausts are going to run from 0.30mm to 0.20mm before the intakes run from 0.15 to 0.10mm limit so when the rear intakes reach 0.10mm I'll redo them all.

If it wasn't clear in my previous post, if you have a center stand you can easily reach the rear cam chain tensioner bolt without removing the rear tire, moving the ABS motor, removing plastic flaps or using a swivel. There is a clean shot to the bolt if you have enough socket extensions. Do not remove the bolt per the service manual because getting the rear bolt re-threaded is very difficult due to the tensioner spring and limited access. Just back the bolt out 10 full turns (or 40 quarter turns) and you can release the tensioner pawl and free the cams (practice on the rear cylinder first since it is easier to see the pawl than on the fronts). Easy peasy.

On my K7 (Gen1) Wee it took about 3ft or more of extensions to get the socket wrench out past the rear of the tire, sounds crazy but that is much easier than other methods (I have done it the hard way in the past). I just pulled the rear exhaust cam on my L4 (Gen2) Wee for the first time and Suzuki changed the angle of the access. There is a gap between the front swingarm spar and the exhaust for a clean shot to the bolt and with about 18" of extensions the wrench comes out just in front of the rear tire and below the swing arm (I couldn't do full turns so counted forty 1/4 turns).
 

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Thanks DMF.

My bike should turn over 40K miles this weekend, and I plan to begin the valve check and adjust process at that point.

Will definitely keep your advice in mind. Am thinking I'll do the rear, completely, first, then the front. Plan to take my time, as you did, and generally adjust as you did, using the same shim source. Prolly won't push the exhausts to the edge of the range, as you did, but close to it. It's cold here now, so I don't get to ride as much as usual, so a good time to do it.

:smile2:
 

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Full instructions with photo's here. No need to remove the rear wheel, just a few socket extension bars and swivels required.
Hope that helps, it's really quite an easy, but time consuming, job :)

Valve Check and Adjustment
Wow fantastic write up, thanks so much.......I need to sticky that.
 

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Wow fantastic write up, thanks so much.......I need to sticky that.
I agree, great write up and well illustrated and a much clearer explanation than the service manual which really only makes sense after you have been through it once.

If I may, I'd like to second the nomination for stickification.
 

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I've done three valve adjustments('05,'07 and '15) and all were the exhausts only. I could not tell post adjustment that the bike ran any different and that is most likely because the '07 & '15) were on the tight side but barely still in spec. I know we have debated the whole "leave it alone if it's in spec" vs "move them to the center of spec while you are in there" argument, so I leave that up to the owner. But for me, I plan on keeping my bike until it's got 70 or 80K on it so I wanted to know where the valves were @ 20ish K.

Now the '05 was my buddys bike and he bought it cheap(80K miles) with a dreaded "taptaptaptap" sound and I bet those valves had never been checked or adjusted because the exhausts were waaay way out of adjustment . We put them back to middle spec and the "taptaptap" went away, but it does burn a bit of oil which may or may not be related to the lack of valve maintenance.

Winter is the time to get it done if you are gonna do it and guess what?......it's gettin chilly outside:)
 
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