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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The cam chains are tensioned by the coil spring in or on the cam chain adjusters numbers 6 and 8. There is also a pawl to apply a series of positive stops as the chains wear. There is no tension check procedure in the service manual.

 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It sounds like drive chain noise to me. It follows the bike speed rather than the engine rpm. Cam chain problems are rare on Stroms and when they happen it's because of clogged oil passages or other oil problems, not the chain tensioners.
 

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is part #2 plastic or metal

is part #2 plastic or metal

I was wondering about durability (I'm an engineer - I can't help it)
 

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is part #2 plastic or metal

I was wondering about durability (I'm an engineer - I can't help it)
A pic of this one damaged by a broken cam chain looks to be plastic.


 

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All plastic followers work by the side plates cutting grooves then the broad surface of the body or rollers start riding on the plastic and the wear pretty much stops.

Remember to change them at your 200,000 mile service

I didn't know the cam chains were hi Vo types which somewhat contradicts what I just said
 

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It sounds like drive chain noise to me. It follows the bike speed rather than the engine rpm. Cam chain problems are rare on Stroms and when they happen it's because of clogged oil passages or other oil problems, not the chain tensioners.
Not necessarily. My cam chain broke because of a manufacturing defect in the chain. Had I inspected it when I did the valve check I would have saved myself an engine rebuild. Sport-Touring.Net - DL1000 - Cam Chain Broke
 

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seafoam would help but I think it would need a couple of rides

Most new oil has lots of fresh detergents in it and will do some serious cleaning. You can get 3 qts of decent dino oil as cheap as 1/2 a can of seafoam.

Drain
Fill with new dino oil I would choose rotella
take a couple of rides drain when hot.

oil filter and Fill with some nice bogus synthetic Mobil1 or Rotella *synth and your good

*Thanks to lieing lawyers I think the only real synthetic is Amzoil or redline and some guys like belray. The rest is just ultra refined dino oil not a custom designed molecule
 

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I had one cam chain replaced on my DL 650 - it had stretched to about maximum, for some reason the tensioner that side had stopped tensioning somewhere before 80,000k's (~ when a valve check and an alert mechanic spotted it).

The other was around 20% of life when I fixed that @100,000k's. So yes, normally, change them at the 200,000km service or later - however it is worth checking them.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #13

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Discussion Starter #14
The noise in the video, that is about 40K miles ago, is probably from gravel. It sounds as bad now as it did then. I've treated my engine pretty good, changed oil routinely, even though I don't use synthetic, but mineral oil. My experience was not good with synthetic. Hotter engine, less performance, decreased mileage etc...
 

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That's what I want to do. Inspect the chain and tension. But how do I check the tension?
The automatic chain tensioner for the front cylinder is located in the pic below.





The rear tensioner is very difficult to get at. You can see it in this pic where the engine is out of the frame but I can't remember if you can get at it without major disassembly. Something makes me think you can't.



My front cam chain looked like this when it broke...



The link where it broke had that white paint on it. It is the only link so painted. The type of wear I experienced on the guides indicated that the chain broke progressively. You can see that it is composed of many plates.

This is the front guide where the chain broke. You can see the angle at which the broken chain "cut" across the guide.


As you'd expect, the rear guides had very little wear in comparison. IIRC, you can't get the guides out without taking the heads off.

I wouldn't worry excessively about a cam chain breaking. But it wouldn't be a bad idea to rotate the chain through an entire revolution, inspecting as you go, to make certain that nothing is coming apart. I wish I had!
 
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