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Discussion Starter #1
I just came back from the dealership, looking at ~700$ in maintenance (stuff i think, and stuff i do need).

One thing i wonder about, how do i know i need a valve adjustment? Is it a thing you don't question and just do? The bike runs well, but i noticed some buzzing/vibrating at higher speeds recently, so i guessed it was due to that...

Btw i'm at 81000kms... shitty summer this year...
 

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Your owners manual will state when the valves need to be checked.
Nobody can KNOW if your valves need to be adjust untill they check them.
Most dealers will have a price to Check the valves...and if you talk to them you will find out that IF 1 or 2 or 3 need to be adjust there will be another cost.

So, what is it they are doing exactly?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Your owners manual will state when the valves need to be checked.
Nobody can KNOW if your valves need to be adjust untill they check them.
Most dealers will have a price to Check the valves...and if you talk to them you will find out that IF 1 or 2 or 3 need to be adjust there will be another cost.

So, what is it they are doing exactly?
Well so far we're not doing anything. I walked in and asked for a price.

There was talk about the valves, spark plugs, oil change (stupid filter is stuck), rear brake pads and air filter.

I've been told a couple times that valves rarely need adjusting, that i would know when to do it, so far i haven't seen a clear sign, hence my question to owners of similar bikes :)
 

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I've been told a couple times that valves rarely need adjusting, that i would know when to do it, so far i haven't seen a clear sign, hence my question to owners of similar bikes :)
The valve clearances typically move a bit when the motor is new then don't move or move slowly for a long time until middle and end of life. There is no overt sign that they need adjustment until they are dangerously tight (could damage the valves). This is why checking the clearance is a maintenance item. The new vibration is something else, not the valve clearances.
 

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Oil filter is stuck? If last one that changed the oil is them some one sure spun it way too tight.If you can change the oil and brakes on your car or truck they are just as easy on most motorcycles. The way the filter hangs out this sure should not be trouble to get off with a strap wrench.I have taken a small chisel on old cars with stuck spin on in places not easy to get at like the strom. Lots of small hits on the out side lip and as soon as it moves at all you got it.Still think a good strap wrench will do the deed.Good luck.
 

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I would do all of the easy stuff: brakes pads and oil / filter and let the valves / air cleaner for the dealer (since both require removing the tank). Go by the owner's manual when to check the valves but make sure the dealer tells you the values for each valve before / after adjustment if needed. That info will help you kind of gauge how much is left before it is needed again.

Grab the filter with a giant set of ChannelLocks and "Lefty Loosey". Who cares what the old filter look like when you're done.
 

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At 80K miles the mechanic adjusted one exhaust in the front cylinder and told me to call him in 30K miles for another check.
 

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I'm not sure that I would ever go to all of that trouble to open up the engine and not change the shims to provide max clearance if mathematically it could be achieved. Seems to me that the shop bill would not change significantly, as a % of the total, if the shims were changed to maximize clearance. What difference, monetarily, would the shop / mechanic see by not going the extra step if they had the full range of shims available?

Again, I don't have V-Strom valve shim experience but have done it multiple times on my and other's KLRs (last 10 yrs). My local shop exchanges shims for free, so open up engine on Saturday, measure / exchange, beer, close up on Sunday and test ride.
 

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A shop should change more for a shim change than a simple check. Changing shims takes considerably longer, especially if both front and rear cam chains have to be derailed.
 

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I'm not sure that I would ever go to all of that trouble to open up the engine and not change the shims...
Yeah, if I went that far (personally) I'd change the shims unless the valves were near center of the tolerance range. To me, the tedious work was getting to the engine and putting all that stuff back on after the engine work was done. Once I got to work on the engine itself I enjoyed taking the gap measurements and replacing some shims to get the valves back in the middle of the allowable range.

For a shop, yes, it certainly takes more time to do the shim changes and the shop, of course, deserve to be paid fairly for their time.
 
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