Strom Trooper banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone in the general upper left corner area have an evening or weekend day to give me a hand with a valve adjust? I've been procrastinating most of the winter about doing a bunch of maintenance and now that I've finally gotten the bike torn down I'm realizing my wrenching skills are so rusty they're fossilized. It's been 20+ years since I've been inside an engine and I'm thinking at this point it would be better (MUCH BETTER) to have someone with firsthand experience either doing the actual measuring and shim replacement or at least looking closely over my shoulder.

I've got a nice garage with plenty of room and light and all the tools and parts needed (although my new feeler gauges might not fit in there and I'll be damned if I can find my micrometers anywhere). The radiator's removed, the cam covers are off, everything's ready to go. But me. :confused:

So, any interest? I'm more than willing to shell out for food and beer (afterwards!) or even pay to have it done. What I don't want is to have spring arrive and the bike not running, and left to my own devices that's a real possibility. It's been 2 months since I rode and I'm itching. (I got a cream to take care of that, don't worry. :mrgreen:)

If there's enough interest and it could happen quickly maybe this could be a little tech session? My next few weekends are open so that's an option.

Thanks in advance,
Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,437 Posts
Chuck, first call around and see if any of the local dealers will swap the shims for a small fee. Some might do it for free; the Enumclaw dealer charges $4 which is fine. While the tank is off it is a good time to change the coolant, spark plugs, and air filter if those are due.

If you want to tip-toe into the procedure just take the measurements; find the posting...
http://www.stromtrooper.com/maintenance-how/27756-dl650-valve-adjustment-notes-tips.html

Remove your seat, side panels, tank. The engine needs to be cold. A millimeter feeler gauge makes the job easier. Just measure the rear cylinder's valves to start. With the wrench as described in the link, turn the engine so the cam lobes are not pushing the valves down. There will be space between the cam base circle and the top of the valve bucket. The feeler gauge should slide in with minor to moderate resistance. It usually is like a go or no-go gauge--either is slips in or it doesn't. The intake valves should have a gap of 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm (0.004" to 0.008") under the cam. Which are the intakes? The two valves closest to the valley of the V; the valves closest to the intake manifold. The exhausts are closest to the exhaust pipe. The exhaust valves need a gap of 0.2 mm to 0.3 mm (0.008" to 0.012"), 'cuz they get hotter and expand more. If you have clearances in this range, you're engine is OK. Button it back up. Double check that the rubber gasket for the valve cover sits in the recess correctly and put a small dab of silicone gasket sealer on the half-moon of the gasket. After the cover is on and with the tank up in the service position, run the engine briefly to check for oil leaks. If the valve clearances aren't at spec you will need to remove the chain tensioner, lift off the camshaft of the offending valve, remove the shim, read its size where it is stamped on it or measure its thickness with a dial caliper or micrometer, and get a different shim of the thickness to give the right clearance. Nothing tricky with picking the shim, simple addition or subtraction of the gap and the shim thickness. Removing the chain tensioner, lifting the camshaft off, putting the camshaft back in the right timing chain sprocket tooth, and replacing the tensioner are tricky. Get help.

The front is more trouble due to the radiator in the way. It is said that the radiator lower mounting bolt can be loosened and the radiator swung away for room to work. Yeah, right, maybe if you have hands the size of a pixie's. The radiator comes off pretty easy with a couple of electrical connectors that need their latch depressed more than it seems possible to get them apart. There is one plastic catch on the radiator shroud that I've never understood how to get off; it either slips off or breaks, not a huge deal. Then, the valve lash measurement is the same as the rear, but with the engine rotated to a different position. Removing the timing chain tensioner is easier, 'cuz it can be seen instead of just felt.

Our bikes seem to be tolerant of many types of coolant. I use Zerex Asian Vehicle antifreeze. Good for five years. Others use universal antifreeze or just about anything including motorcycle specific antifreeze, and there seems to be no reports of problems. The bike takes about a half gallon. Don't forget to drain and refill the coolant expansion tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks, guys, maybe a trip to Bellingham would be great way to start spring?? 101 around the peninsula, there's nothing like Forks in the spring! :green_lol: The weather's nice up here (right now, probably not in 15 minutes.)

PTRider, I'm way ahead of you, I've done all that, it's totally stripped down with the valve covers off and lined up for TDC on the front cylinder. Once I saw how little room there is and realized how out of practice I am I thought it might be a good time for some experienced hands to do the actual measuring, fitting, remeasuring, refitting, etc. That's the part that matters, let's face it, and the part I really don't want to mess up. And the last engines I adjusted the valves on had pushrods, or none at all (rotaries).

My hope is that someone local might take pity and stop by for an hour to show me how simple it is, steal my pizza and beer while watching Best Bar in America, and leave me to the rest of the work. One can hope, can't one?

Tom
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top