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Hi All,

Just picked up a new Vee and am getting set to do the initial 600 mile service. Is there anywhere on the interweb that lists the torque specs of the various bolts/fastners?

Also, any recommendations on a good torque wrench for moto use?

Thx.

pmk
 

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Cannot help with torque specs, but if you use a torque wrench, make sure it is good quality, and more importantly, is calibrated. Now if the torque specs are like 60-90 ft/lbs, calibration is not critical, IMHO. HOWEVER if some of the specs are say 20ft/lbs and below, or close to, and you do not have a good feel for those values, and you tend to over tighten...calibration of a high quality torque wrench in critical. Also, knowing how to care for a torque wrench, getting it calibrated annually. I don’t do anything that requires a torque wrench. Made that mistake a long time ago. Had a high quality torque wrench, but it’s calibration was from at least a few years before I used it. Big, costly mistake.
Many will tell you that a torque wrench calibration is not critical. I can say from personal experience; it is very critical. Unless you don’t mind forking out $3k in transmission repairs from over torqued hardware. Been there. Done that.




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I think you need to bite the bullet and get the manual.

As already mentioned low torque screws can be easily over-torqued. Better to use common sense and your hands with a regular wrench unless you get a true high grade tool. You may need two, one for low and another for high torque range. Others may comment, which ones to get. I use mine only for higher torque applications.
 

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Torque wrenches are more accurate in the top half of their range.
If youre torquing a fastener to, say, 45 ft lbs, use a 5-75 ft-lb 3/8" drive torque wrench rather than a 30-200 ft lb 1/2"drive torque wrench and a 1/2" to 3/8"adapter.
Dwayneh is absolutely correct concerning torque wrench calibration. I'm still in contact with my Snap-on dealer, and several months ago I gave him my 9 torque wrenches for calibration. Most Snap-on dealers have on-truck torque wrench testers, and in 20 minutes I was done. All of mine, some 40 years old, were within 3% of spec. But I wouldnt have know that unless I had them checked. Ive taken Horror Fright torque wrenches to him from friends, and they were iffy at best--most failed, some didnt even click off no matter what.
 

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The first think I bought when I got my bike was a full service manual. It's all in there.

I can't imagine doing my own service, repairs etc and not having one.
 

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Hi All,
Also, any recommendations on a good torque wrench for moto use?
Bite the bullet, buy a Snap-on torque wrench, and you'll have it for life. provided you take care of it and dial it down to it's minimum setting when not in use, it'll be dead accurate too. If youre goint to use it for torquing axles, start with the 1/2" drive click-type model. The new ones have a 50-250 ft-lb range. If you can swing it, get the 3/8" drive model as well. the range is 5-75 ft-lbs, and covers things like axle pinch bolts, caliper mounting bolts, steering triple clamps, various others in that range.
Beyond that, there's the in-lb models, 40-200 in-lbs, bolts such as valve cover, side cases, etc.
For me the 1/2' and 3/8" torque wrenches are must-haves, depending on what your work intentions are.
For me, the main things are the warranty and ability to have them calibrated.
Not as convenient or quick to use, but the beam-type torque wrenches are extremely inexpensive compared to my Snap-on, but are even more accurate. When my dealer tested the S-K beam 1/2" I bought in '69, it was within 1% of spec. It now hangs on a wall in my garage.
 

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... But I wouldnt have know that unless I had them checked. Ive taken Horror Fright torque wrenches to him from friends, and they were iffy at best--most failed, some didnt even click off no matter what.

My son is a pro mechanic and has a couple of Harbor Freight torque wrenches. He checked them against the shops Snapon wrenches when the truck came by.

The HF wrenches faired very well especially compared to the Snapons. For the less than 1/10th the cost of the Snapon they are a certainly usable for a home mechanic.

He's had his for a few years BTW.
 

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99% of general fasters can be tightened by feel and be just fine. If you are remotely mechanical oriented you'll be fine w/o a torque wrench and a chart full of torque specs.

If you are going to get into engine work that's a different story and a calibrated torque wrench should be used.

Honestly most people go out and buy a 24" long clicker type torque wrench because it ranges from about 20 ft/lbs to well over 100 ft/lbs. Use something like this and your next thread will be asking how to remove snapped off fasteners or how to repair stripped out threads.

All fasteners have a torques spec. because when engineers designing something they have to use a spec. value for the manufacture to follow. Snug or one grunt is not a repeatable known value. 26 ft/lbs is. In the home garage a body fastener hardly needs to be torqued to spec to have it do its job the same as most or the fasteners.
 

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My son is a pro mechanic and has a couple of Harbor Freight torque wrenches. He checked them against the shops Snapon wrenches when the truck came by.

The HF wrenches faired very well especially compared to the Snapons. For the less than 1/10th the cost of the Snapon they are a certainly usable for a home mechanic.

He's had his for a few years BTW.
Spec, he wouldnt have known his HF wrenches were ok if it werent for the Snap-on truck. Where is HF's truck?
The HF torque wrenches Ive taken to my Snap-on dealer have been spotty in terms of calibration. Some were within 5%, some were closer, a couple were 20% or more off. Ive brought in MAC torque wrenches also. One clicked off at 90 ft lbs when the wrench was set to 62 ft lbs.( Mazda had a head gasket campaign involving '79-'82 626s and B-Series Trucks). One is a MAC in-lb model I also own, and is on the ragged edge of 5% off, while my 30-year old Snap-on in lb models are right on the beam. And I used my Snap-ons day in and day out.
Tools didnt cost me money--they MADE me money. The better tools made me more with less down time and more accurate results. And I only had to buy them one time.
The point is no matter whose torque wrench you use verify the calibration.
As for anybody who thinks they have a calibrated arm, yes, I can get close from decades of doing this. But, not always. And from Day 1 I made it a point that if there was a spec for the bolt or nut, I torqued it to spec. When you personally have witnessed the aftermath of wheels coming off a car, or have to repair stripped valve cover bolts that the previous ALLEGED TECH tightened, you see the value in torquing.
Many times fasteners strip while torquing due to bolt or thread damage from prior over-torquing. And you can get into trouble real quick if you just blindly torque away and not feel threads ready to let go, or a bolt snap in half.
Which is how I got my 2 month old Snap on 1/2" electric impact wrench. The tech left wheels loose, 2 came off, wiped out the back of a Mazda RX-8...and blamed the tool. The dealer took it back, tested it, was just fine, and I bought it for 1/3 the cost of new. When I asked the...tech.. what happened, he told me the impact wrench failed. I asked him if his torque wrench failed at the same time. *Crickets* is all I got in return. He torques them all by hand now.
 

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Just do a search for V service manual - you can read it free online.. When you find it you can find the torque specs for whatever you're looking for.
 

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And from Day 1 I made it a point that if there was a spec for the bolt or nut, I torqued it to spec .
Every fastener has a torque spec. and I bet you do not torque all fastens to spec.. I mean come on the M4 bolts that holds on the side panels would you really torque them to spec.?

I use M6 x 1.25 bolts to hold on my license plate do you think its a necessity to torque them to 9 Nm if using a 8.8 or 13 Nm is using a 10.9?
 

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I should have clarified my response. I torque all brake, suspension, powertrain, wheel bolts to spec. If there is any question on trim or cosmetic pieces, I refer to the manual in either the bolt size/thread, or if that fastener is pointed out, I may go to that.
Spend many hours at a dealer straightening out another ALLEGED tech's overtorqued mistake, or repairing the aftermath of something left loose, you learn what to do and more importantly, what NOT to do.
Besides, it gives me a chance to use my 9 torque wrenches and keeps me in tune as to what a torque setting feels like.

Years ago some young kid in the shop asked me how tight to tighten a bolt. I told him "One quarter-turn before strippage". He thanked me...then came right back into my stall, laughing, told me he got my message, and began torquing things from that point forward.
 

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Every fastener has a torque spec. and I bet you do not torque all fastens to spec.. I mean come on the M4 bolts that holds on the side panels would you really torque them to spec.?

I use M6 x 1.25 bolts to hold on my license plate do you think its a necessity to torque them to 9 Nm if using a 8.8 or 13 Nm is using a 10.9?

I (mostly) only torque bolts that need even tightening as an assembly. Cam caps, valve covers, tripple tree clamps, rear sprocket, that kind of stuff.

I'm not worried about bigger bolts generally unless they thread into aluminum. I use thread locker on most every bolt.

Using the right size drive helps to not strip bolts. 1/4" for 12mm and under. Smaller tools make it harder to apply too much force (for me at least).
 

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Every fastener has a torque spec. and I bet you do not torque all fastens to spec.. I mean come on the M4 bolts that holds on the side panels would you really torque them to spec.?

I use M6 x 1.25 bolts to hold on my license plate do you think its a necessity to torque them to 9 Nm if using a 8.8 or 13 Nm is using a 10.9?


Not to pick on the poster, but this is one of those “use COMMON SENSE”. A license plate bolt, I’m pretty sure he wasn’t referring to license plate bolts. As he clarified, brakes and things that will keep you from getting killed. Again, not picking on the poster, but please exercise common sense.


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Not to pick on the poster, but this is one of those “use COMMON SENSE”. A license plate bolt, I’m pretty sure he wasn’t referring to license plate bolts. As he clarified, brakes and things that will keep you from getting killed. Again, not picking on the poster, but please exercise common sense.


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He is the one who stated: "Day 1 I made it a point that if there was a spec for the bolt or nut, I torqued it to spec. "

Doesn't every nut and/or bolt have a torque spec?
 

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I have 3. Older Craftsman 1/4 and 3/8 drives, newer HF 1/2 inch drive. Spend your money on the lower range wrenches.

I also torque most things that I commonly work on. Especially oil drain plugs and spark plugs.

My feeling is that the wrenches should be used in the middle 50% of their range. They are precision tools and should be treated as such. Store them at minimum setting. Never use one to loosen stuff. They are not hammers. They never get loaned to anybody to use out of my sight.
 

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He is the one who stated: "Day 1 I made it a point that if there was a spec for the bolt or nut, I torqued it to spec. "



Doesn't every nut and/or bolt have a torque spec?


Absolutely. Reading between the lines though; I was interjecting my interpretation of what he was saying: torque to specs yes, but the comment was made that he must be nuts to torque the license plate bolts. I mean, that is taking it too literally. Lol. Seriously.


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