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Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys,

I tooke a look at the DL1000 entire section, and didn't find anything specific about the 2018 model fuel consumption.
I wouls like to know what mileage do you usually get. I mean, not the best mileage made once in the past, but the consistent mileage you always get with a full tank.
 

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48 - 50 MPG average low of 38 (80+ MPH and headwinds) to a high 61 in the Rockys (Never over 55mph). Only a few mpg less than my 05 650.
 

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Nice! I didn't know the new Vees could get that kind of mileage.

I'll just throw that on the "reasons to upgrade my 2002" pile...
 

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Yet another reason why the new 1000 is worth the upgrade from the first generation, or if 650 owners want a bit more kick in the britches with all the other nice things it offers.
 

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A 2018 might be better but over 99,091 miles / 159,473 km my 2015 DL1000 has averaged 43.0 MPG US or 5.47 L/100km.) (Which is 2.6 MPG US worse than my 2006 DL650 got over 202,435 miles and 6.4 MPG US worse than my 2012 DL650 got over 139,553 miles.)

I'm continue to be in awe of the mileage other riders get! :)

..Tom
 

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My experience on secondary roads, brisk pace with panniers and trip luggage weight (no passenger) about 44 to 45 mpg. Going fast and headwind can make it drop significantly into the low 30th. Going slow can get you well above 50mpg.

Note: Its supposed to be medium grade but if not available I find no difference with regular, just don't flog it like crazy.
 

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I am younger and like to turn the right wrist ? so I average upper 30s to low 40s mpg. Worse than my 2015 Dl650. Didn't matter if I had luggage or not. rode it easy or hard I consistanly got +50s on that bike. You gotta pay to play I guess haha
 

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Discussion Starter #10
At the end of the day, it also depends a lot of where we live and what type of traffic each one faces.
Of course, this is a 1000cc bike, and in highway there is no doubts it will suck more fuel. What is very variable is facing the traffic, and cruising regarding the type of road.
I think thats why a lot of us get such different mileage in the same bike. Each one of us has different types of riding conditions, different style of driving... but we all have pass through all of them in many situations, and I think it's more "fair" to catalogue it in categories, and so others can fit themselves in the right categorie.

So if we had to descriminate, I will separate this in 3 main types:
- Highway (85 mph)
- Cruising (50-60 mph)
- City with some traffic

which values do you get in your bikes?
 

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I get a solid 45 mpg with my 2012.

KKORO
 

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...So if we had to descriminate, I will separate this in 3 main types:
- Highway (85 mph)
- Cruising (50-60 mph)
- City with some traffic

which values do you get in your bikes?

Well according to the current mileage readout on the gauge...

85 mph = low 30's. I've seen mid 20's going into a good headwind.
50-60ish = mid 40's
City no idea.

I had the 650 before my 2014 1000. The 1000 consistently gets 10 miles less per gallon.

The only time I care about the gas mileage is when I'm out in the middle of nowhere. I carry an extra gallon in a Rotopax in those situations. So far the I haven't needed it but I have throttled back on occasion to conserve!
 

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Spec;5350911 The only time I care about the gas mileage is when I'm out in the middle of nowhere. I carry an extra gallon in a Rotopax in those situations. So far the I haven't needed it but I have throttled back on occasion to conserve![/QUOTE said:
and it's pretty easy to be out in the middle of nowhere around here. riding eastern CA and western NV with fuel station few and far between I haven't resorted to carrying extra fuel yet ('13 650) but on 3 occasions fuel stations I was counting on were unable to supply fuel for one reason or another. AAA folks aren't impressed when they have to deliver fuel 60 miles to a motorbike parked beside the fuel pumps. (Amboy CA)
 

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I carry extra gas if I'm going more than 40-50 miles from the nearest gas.

Got a Rotopax can last summer, but have struggled with a good way to mount it. So far I've been securing it to a side case rack with Rok straps. It works, but is kind of a PITA to have to unravel that when I fill or use the can.

No one makes a Givi luggage adapter for Rotopax cans, and on an actual road trip I wouldn't want to give up the side case.

I've seen an L-bracket thing that attaches to the top case rack, but the hole spacing is wrong - I'll need an adapter for the adapter.

That said, I have a friend with all the good tools (welder, plasma cutter, you name it) needed to get up to sheetmetal mischief, so a solution may be only as far away as a bottle of his favorite beverage.
 

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I pay attention to the "Range to Empty" on my DL1000. I know that the colder it is the more optimistic it is (ie in colder temps I could run out of gas even though it still says there is some range left.)

When slabbing (I did a fair amount of that last year) I very much will look at the projected range and often adjust speeds to make sure I can reach gas. This is especially true when in unfamiliar areas. Several times my range to empty had dropped enough that I wouldn't have made the stop I was aiming for so I slowed down until the range showed I would comfortably make it. I will normally look ahead on my GPS while riding and make sure there is a stop or two comfortably within my range (generally it is best to aim for large truck stops and/or exits that have two or more stations) and a backup a bit up the road in case the first isn't open.

When out west (or in almost any isolated area) it is very common to find that gas stations are closed or long gone. Good idea to gas up long before you have to.

There are a few times I wished I had extra gas although I have been fortunate enough to not run out when on a trip. I did carry extra gas this summer when my wife and I were heading up the Labrador Highway. The distance to gas was far enough that it was borderline if we could make it on our bikes. I bought two 5-liter gas cans and strapped them onto the side of my topcase using my Rok Straps. Never needed them as her bike crashed long before gas was an issue.



..Tom
 

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...
Got a Rotopax can last summer, but have struggled with a good way to mount it. So far I've been securing it to a side case rack with Rok straps. It works, but is kind of a PITA to have to unravel that when I fill or use the can...

I have a Touratech top plate on my bike (no top box). It's drilled for the Rotopax mount.

 

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... I bought two 5-liter gas cans and strapped them onto the side of my topcase using my Rok Straps...


..Tom

Would have probably been quite the fire if you would have had to "lay er down" :grin2:

 

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Would have probably been quite the fire if you would have had to "lay er down" :grin2:

...
hahaha!

I try not to fall over on bonfires!

..Tom
 
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