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Hey guys,

I know I am speaking to a biased crowd, but there is a reason for this. I want to know your thoughts on taking a cruiser across the US vs. taking a V-Strom across the same (Los Angeles to New York). I am oscillating between either purchasing a V-star or Shadow, or a V-strom for this ride. Reliability and comfortability are my focuses. What is pulling me away from a V-strom is the cost. I get that you get what you pay for (as with everything) but I am trying to be cost conscience.

With that said, any opinions are greatly appreciated!!

Thanks. :mrgreen:
 

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Cruiser is a big difference from lets say a bagger, a Goldwing or sport touring machine. Cruisers can be made to be comfortable I guess, but everything depends on the rider and how they are set up. A V-Strom and other ADV style bikes like it are superior in many riding styles and have "tons" of aftermarket goodies out there to make them serious touring machines. To me cruisers are one dimensional, they are for cruising and weekend rides and commuting. My opinion of course, but I would never own a cruiser EVER, I have been down the sport touring route before with a Kawasaki Concours 14, and it is one damn fine machine. Stroms and lets say the BMW GS, are the ideal machine for me and all the exploring and riding that I love to do, and I am hands down the most comfortable as well. You need to ride some bikes it sounds like, to really see what you might just like more than a cruiser. And cost of a V-Strom is expensive to you........seriously?
 

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I think cruiser ergonomics are horrible for long rides, like lifting weight with your back instead of your legs and arms
I would have to disagree. It all depends on your body type (what hurts and what does not) and the actual bike setup. I get severe pain in my hips on the V strom, but I installed some highway pegs and alls good now for long trips, on the otherhand I also have a VZ1600 (meanstreak) and forward controls with a Mustang seat (stock seat played havoc with my sciatic) and I've ridden 800+ mile days. You have to see how each bike 'fits' you. I also had a VZR1800 for a while, but due to the seat/ foot control position I hated it and to this day have pain from the last long ride I did ( 800 miles and 1 year ago)...
 

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Yes, do you know something I don't know?
Well I know that when compared to most motorcycles, yes the V-Stroms are pretty cheap in comparison. Whether buying used or new, they are allot of bang for the buck when compared to the majority. Being we don't yet know your riding experience and what all you have ridden, all we can give are our experiences, and many of us here have allot of that.
 

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As an example of cost comparison, a new Kawasaki Vulcan 900 classic LT (for Light Touring) is around $10,000.00. A new 650 VStrom is around $8500.00. A Honda shadow 750 may cost less, but trust me, you wouldn't want to take one cross country. Even a 2014 1000 VStrom is "only" a shade above $12K, but a Kawasaki Nomad will set you back just under $18000. Granted, none of these bikes is cheap, but some are less than others. By the way, unless you are very long of leg, a 6509 VStrom is a very capable and comfortable for a coast to coast ride. If you want to really save money, there are plenty of used, low-mileage 650 VStroms available, and all years are reliable. A good '07 Wee could probably, depending on where you are, go for around $3500--$4000. That's not very expensive, and it would likely have some pretty good farkles, as well.
 

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As an example of cost comparison, a new Kawasaki Vulcan 900 classic LT (for Light Touring) is around $10,000.00. A new 650 VStrom is around $8500.00. A Honda shadow 750 may cost less, but trust me, you wouldn't want to take one cross country. Even a 2014 1000 VStrom is "only" a shade above $12K, but a Kawasaki Nomad will set you back just under $18000. Granted, none of these bikes is cheap, but some are less than others. By the way, unless you are very long of leg, a 6509 VStrom is a very capable and comfortable for a coast to coast ride. If you want to really save money, there are plenty of used, low-mileage 650 VStroms available, and all years are reliable. A good '07 Wee could probably, depending on where you are, go for around $3500--$4000. That's not very expensive, and it would likely have some pretty good farkles, as well.

Damn, I wish bikes here in Oz were that cheap. :furious:

The '14 1000 is $16k plus on roads here, and that is for the base bike without any extras.
A used Wee starts at around the $5k mark.

Any of the twin spark plug, ABS fitted Wee-Stroms would be great.

My '09 Wee has carried me on many long trips loaded with luggage without missing a beat, by long I mean 14 days/4,000- 5,000 kms per trip.

Far cheaper to run and maintain than my BMW R1150GS was while still being as capable on dirt, and more versatile than my Goldwing for taking "detours"... the 'Wing is a very comfortable and easy ride, but much more a "good tar" bike than an all rounder like the Wee is.
 

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My DL1000 VStrom did quite well on it's first +1100 mile trip last weekend but I have to say for long distance riding I'm spoiled by my Victory Vision. Once I put a decent seat on the Vee it will be a close competition though. I really enjoy the ability to take those less traveled dirt roads on the Vee and the luggage capacity was more than adequate for a four day trip.
 

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You need to ride some bikes it sounds like, to really see what you might just like more than a cruiser.
Others on this thread have said it as well but Big B said it pretty concisley, you need to ride some bikes so that you can decide what's right for you. Preferably more than just around the block.

I do have to say that I like being able to stand on my pegs, or stretch out on highway pegs. Being able to move around like that is a big benefit to me. Plus I like being able to use my legs as suspension when needed.

Mikeg
 

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Are you planning a leisurely 2-weeks of back roads, stopping lots to smell the flowers; or pounding across on interstates in 2 or 3 days at sustained high speed?

I'll be the pariah: a VStrom 650 is not the way I'd want to do the latter. I'm up in the dirty air getting buffeted around, the fuel economy advantage is lost, it's light so it's tossed around by wind blast, and I just don't like running at high rpm.
The VStrom 1000 would be a better choice, but still needs (for me, anyway) an aftermarket seat and screen to make it bearable. Add those to the higher initial cost.

A cruiser - in the broad sense of being a lower bike with a tractor seat and a big windshield - is probably a step ahead in terms of wind and butt management, but the forward controls alter the seating comfort for many. I think there are some mid-control cruisers. FTM, take a Goldwing, change the styling a bit, add some chrome, it could pass for a 'cruiser'.

If you're looking to save money, drive a small car. Everything motorcycle is ridiculously expensive.
 

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I came to my 05 DL650 from an 83 Yamaha Venture that I did a frame up rebuild on that made it into a new awesome, 900 lb sport touring machine that I really loved, even though my low back, sciatica, & legs had problems after a bit on the bike - I did a LOT of commuting & weekend riding on that bike.
Last fall I did a 2 week, 5000 mile western states ride on my 450 lb
Strom. It was totally awesome, & a LOT more comfortable than it would have been on the venture. And now I no longer have to deal with carburetors & old technology ignition!
LOVE my Strom - much more comfortable.
Doug
 

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If this is your idea of a cruiser:

The answer would be, "No, HELL NO."


If this is your idea of a cruiser:



I could make that work.

It would be a different ride than I would do on a V-Strom, slower-paced on the back roads with less disinclination for the Interstate. I would definitely prefer this over a V-Strom if I had a passenger. If you're on the road long enough, you might just find one or two.

With mid-controls, an actual suspension, comfy saddle and sane handlebars, a touring cruiser would be a lovely way to visit America.
 

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I'll sell you a used Harley Davidson Road King for less than what a new V-strom would cost you. It's the perfect bike for long distance touring. You'll have to come across the country to get it, but still......
 

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Like I said before.......BIG difference between a bagger and a cruiser. ;)
 

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As an example of cost comparison, a new Kawasaki Vulcan 900 classic LT (for Light Touring) is around $10,000.00. A new 650 VStrom is around $8500.00. A Honda shadow 750 may cost less, but trust me, you wouldn't want to take one cross country. Even a 2014 1000 VStrom is "only" a shade above $12K, but a Kawasaki Nomad will set you back just under $18000.
But if you compare used to used it is probably just as easy to find a coast-to-coast capable cruiser at a price point similar to a 'Strom. I have been up to your part of the world on both my Wee and a cruiser (Honda 1100 Spirit) and I found them both perfectly capable on any paved surface and even some stretches of packed gravel or dirt.

Right now I'm trying to decide whether I want to take the Wee or the Kaw 1600 on road trips this summer. Sure, the Wee gives me more flexibility and sportiness, but on the slab or decent rural roads the big cruiser has a easy-going comfort advantage. At 70 mph the big V-twin is ticking along at around 2860 rpm, and that is pretty relaxing. Because of the feet-forward posture, though, I NEED a backrest. The result is a pronounced La-Z-Boy effect -- which if you are just lazin' along is a perfectly agreeable way to watch the world slide by.

The choice of scoot, then, will be dictated by the route.
 

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But if you compare used to used it is probably just as easy to find a coast-to-coast capable cruiser at a price point similar to a 'Strom. I have been up to your part of the world on both my Wee and a cruiser (Honda 1100 Spirit) and I found them both perfectly capable on any paved surface and even some stretches of packed gravel or dirt.

Right now I'm trying to decide whether I want to take the Wee or the Kaw 1600 on road trips this summer. Sure, the Wee gives me more flexibility and sportiness, but on the slab or decent rural roads the big cruiser has a easy-going comfort advantage. At 70 mph the big V-twin is ticking along at around 2860 rpm, and that is pretty relaxing. Because of the feet-forward posture, though, I NEED a backrest. The result is a pronounced La-Z-Boy effect -- which if you are just lazin' along is a perfectly agreeable way to watch the world slide by.

The choice of scoot, then, will be dictated by the route.
Oh, I agree with that assessment. A true cruiser would be murder on a long ride with the legs straight out and arms stretched all the way out, like a clamshell. I had a Nomad, which is a bagger/touring cruiser and it was a very comfortable ride. So was my Vulcan 900 Classic LT. And both seemed to handle unpaved surfaces quite well. But on my Alaska Hwy trip last year, which was 4000 miles, I found my Wee to be very comfortable. I just wished I had larger saddlebags. Now I do. But that's just me. YMMV, of course.
 
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