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Discussion Starter #1
I take delivery of my DL1000K4 tomorrow after work :mrgreen: and I was wondering what the general consensus (if there is one) is regarding the break-in method.

I've read extensively on both sides of the "hard and fast" vs. "nice and easy" debate and I honestly don't know how to tell the BS from the facts.

What do y'all think?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Dangit! I did it again. There was another thread already running on this topic and I just couldn't wait to post my own.

So again, I'll watch both, but I'd appreciate any input y'all have.
 
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Follow the manual. Take it easy at first, using varying rpms and change the oil after the first 500 miles. I did it by the book and my DL1000 runs great and uses no oil. 8)
 

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Yep, follow the book. Although it doesn't tell you to use varying rpms, that is a good idea. And it really means avoid extended continuous periods at the same rpm such as highway riding. Just roll the throttle off a bit momentarily and back on every minute or two when on the highway, and you'll be okay.

Just remember that all that really breaks in are the rings and, to a limited extent, the cylinder walls. That's it. Nothing else needs to break in except tires. The rings have to "seat" to the cylinder walls. In essence, this is the final machining process of your bike's manufacture, but it happens on the road. The rings and the cylinder walls need to wear down their near-microscopic high spots so that they match each other perfectly. During this process you don't want to overstress the engine because if any of those high spots get too hot, they can harden and then they won't wear down. Instead they will put tiny scratches in your cylinder walls or on your rings that oil can get past. Since you're in Houston, you don't want the bike to get too hot when it's breaking in. Try to avoid getting stuck in traffic with long periods of idling and very slow movement on very hot days. This is most important during the first few hundred miles when most of the metal wear-down is taking place.

Since the break-in process is wearing off metal, people often recommend more frequent oil changes than the manufacturer suggests to get rid of the microscopic bits of metal in the oil early on when most of the wear takes place. For this reason, on a new bike, I'll change the oil after about 250 miles, and then whenever the manufacturer recommended. It certainly can't hurt and only takes a few minutes and a few bucks, so I always figure it's worth it.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very good advice, thanks.

I've read a lot about "seating the rings" but everyone seems to diagree on HOW you should seat them.

I just found out that I can't get my bike today... the dealer is closed for Columbus Day. Oh well. Tomorrow, I guess.

Also, I was planning on taking a "maiden voyage" to Dallas and back this weekend for a business conference. But, that would mean about 4 hours on highways. Am I hearing that this is a bad idea so early in the break in?

thanks.
 

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Brak said:
Also, I was planning on taking a "maiden voyage" to Dallas and back this weekend for a business conference. But, that would mean about 4 hours on highways. Am I hearing that this is a bad idea so early in the break in?
I don't want to get in a discussion on the "best" method to break-in a bike. I'm no expert. One thing I've read this that all methods warn against long periods of constaint rpm's.

I just picked up my Strom last Thursday. This being my fist bike I had no idea which method was "best". I DID have a long group ride (250 miles) mostly highway miles, planned for the weekend. Not wanting to deal with keeping the rpm's low and changing rpm's a lot I used this quick method described here;

http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/index.html#BreakIn

I will say that as a new rider I was somewhat worried about my skills, riding a bike that I'd never riden and riding it "hard". I keep the "hard" stuff limited to straight roads only. Remember your new tires also need around 100 miles to break-in.

After about an hour of break-in I parked the bike and took a long deep breath glad I hadn't crashed or something.

I let the motor cool off a little and changed the oil. There was some fine bits of metal on the drain plug, but that's to be expected.

I went on my long ride and spent most of the time between 50 and 60 mph. I did up/down shift every few minutes to keep from running the engine at a constant rpm.

Only time will tell if my "quick" break-in was right, wrong, or made no difference. My feeling is that the Strom is a modern engine and should be able to handle the rough stuff. If things all go to hell I can always get the extended warranty :lol:

Mike
Tampa, FL
'05 DL650
 
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